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There are systems like the Steinberger Trans-Trem that are supposed to allow a chord to be in tune through a dive-bomb, but for the Stratocaster, it isn't in the cards. In a video for Musicians Institute and Guitar World, Carl Verheyen describes his setup for a floating Strat bridge, giving him a minor third on the G string and a whole step on the B. I think ...


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If you're hoping to get all strings to stay in tune with each other whenn playing a chord (E major pulling up to F major, and dropping down to E♭ major when the vib. is pressed), forget it. You can get the mechanism to balance (somewhat) by adjusting the springs underneath, but with only two springs, it's only going to be approximate. Put the middle spring ...


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It is common to put something under the back of the Floyd Rose bridge to fight the springs while changing strings. I wouldn't go as far as "one string at a time" -- I'm a hardtail guy who has changed strings on a Floyd once, so maybe I'm wrong -- but using a block of wood or a paperback to keep the bridge from going too far should help, especially ...


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As @ToddWilcox says, that is an advertised feature of the Steinberger Transtrem, but for the life of me, that looks like a Kahler bridge, which was Betamax to the Floyd Rose's VHS in the 80s. They still exist but didn't win. The midi pickup and tuning control remind me of a Strat that Fender released years ago, but I don't think that has much to do with the ...


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