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13

The distinction here is presumably one between a measured tremolo and a trill open to your interpretation. With the trill, you can determine how quickly you play it (16ths, 32nds, triplets, or something else?), how consistently you play it (will it begin at the same speed that it ends, or that it is in the middle?), etc. But the measured tremolo here must ...


9

Something like this should be clear. Responding to your comment: OK, just one or two trem. bars then. Or this. (Whoops, I forgot to erase the time signature.) BTW, have you tried playing it? Not at all comfortable, unless your hands are a lot bigger than mine!


8

Tremolo should be a reflex, not a active fast up/down bow. Almost like a vibrato reflex but with the bow. I don't mean bow vibrato, that is another technique/discussion, just mean tremolo should be unconscious, not forced. Sometimes tremolo can be very tiring if the right technique is not there. In classical musical typically Bruckner & Schumann write a ...


7

Vibrato is pretty easy to define because there is one widely agreed-upon definition: a deliberate, regular, periodic change in pitch (like a controlled warble), generally much less than a semitone, sometimes as much as a quarter-tone or more up and down. Vibrato is commonly used as a performance technique by vocalists (including opera singers), players of ...


7

Here is an interesting interview with Jeff Waters, at the beginning he speaks a lot about picking hand technique: To summarize: Practice a lot Vary the tempo Analyze your technique Avoid excessive, unnecessary movements Employ your arm in the movement (rather than just wrist or fingers) – this actually varies between ...


6

Snapping strings has nothing to do with using a trem. A trem in the right position, will let you tune your strings quite happily to the right notes, so you have a separate problem here Aside from raising the trem up to gain more upwards movement, what else have you done? Are your tension springs in the same place, and is the tension bar screwed in the same ...


6

This is a specific kind of tremolo called a "measured tremolo." It means repeating the same note a steady, measured rate. When a quarter note has one slash through the stem, you play two equal notes in its place, so a quarter note with a slash means to play two eighth notes. When that stem has two slashes though the stem, you play four equal notes in its ...


6

The third option is best: re-notate the tremolo in each bar. Depending on how long the tremolo continues, a "repeat previous measure" sign could be used. The tremolo should be notated using the proper "full measure" note-type for the time signature. For example, using whole notes in a 2/4 bar would be incorrect. This is also demonstrated ...


5

Welcome. It looks like you’ve done some research on this beforehand, which is good. The relevant sections of the PDF you provided are here in two images: Arpeggio What it looks like in this piece: How it sounds, slowly, in this piece (roughly). Start by pressing the very bottom note and play each note above it, one at a time, without releasing any of the ...


5

Whether it is tremolo or not depends on the tempo. I mean how fast is the quarter notes? If the tempo is slow then you can play the 32nd notes exactly as 32nd notes. If the tempo is fast then it is tremolo. A usual way to notate tremolo is to make the note values so fast in the relation to the tempo that it is obvious the composer wants tremolo. Thus if the ...


5

I'm not a violinist, but the practice is the same as on guitar. Start with the fundamentals Find a good few videos on proper bow technique, and tremolo technique. Watch them, then at a very slow speed execute them, and when I say slow I mean uncomfortably slow. Start Slow So slow that you can focus entirely on geting an even sound, and playing in ...


5

The mandolin's two string coursing means you get the sound of unisons in a single "note", but also it also means the plucking of the pick on each string is slightly offset in time. You can use tremolo picking across two guitar strings to get the time offset with the picking, and to some extent you can get unisons. If you use the G and B strings on ...


5

I think, first and foremost, they have thin arched bodies that give a punch. Lots of attack and not much sustain. One standard use is using that percussive punch the snare sound, the Chop. If your Bluegrass mando player does nothing else, they chop. The tater-bug mando behaves differently. The flattop guitar behaves differently, without the attack and ...


4

It looks like a tremolo. It is played as a oscillation between the top two notes (I'm guessing a A and a D) and the lower note (I'm guessing an F). The dotted half-note (written on each stem) indicates either 3 quarter-note beats or 6 eighth-note beats (or the equivalent); the 6 eighth notes in the other staff probably mean the latter. The three lines ...


4

There are a number of pieces in the classical music repertoire that were specifically written to help learners develop their tremolo technique. Note: Be absolutely sure to use the correct right-hand fingers in learning tremolo. Carcassi's 25 Etudes, which are in the public domain and can be found in PDF version online, has several pieces which, if ...


4

No, it's almost never about muscles, it's about technique and relaxation. You do want to actually practice it slowly, try to use as little of the pick as possible, find a pick angle that works, and keep things as loose as possible while still having an even up and down motion. I would search YouTube for tremolo picking lessons and watch several until you ...


4

Solution A A fermata may be placed over the tremolo bar and can stand alone or in conjunction with other solutions. In addition to the fermata used here, there are notations for "long" and "very long" fermatas, which could be substituted. Pictures and descriptions of the various fermata types can be found here. "Sempre tremolo"...


4

Normally these sorts of passages are written using smaller notes which usually add up to more than a normal bar. I think your passage would be perfectly clear if you were able to write the solo in smaller notes (like the arpeggios in Aarons answer) whilst having a full bar tremolo in the left hand written full size. The physical length of the bar still ...


4

The Kubi example you posted isn't tremolo picking - I only hear metered 16th notes. Tremolo is more of a continuous sound. There are two factors: first, the pick is angled to allow the point to "skate" across the string, lowering resistance. Second, the wrist is tighter, which brings the muscles of the forearm into play - larger muscles don't ...


4

The answer is yes - see the flamenco guitar below for example https://www.atrafana.com/flamenco-guitar-techniques--tremolo.html Interestingly his right hand technique seems to involve a finger roll a lot like that used in a pipa but without the nail plectrums.


3

It looks like this particular harmonica is a simply diatonic one, giving available notes in C major of C D E F G A and B, in various octaves. To be able to play the 'black keys' - # and b, you really need a chromatic harmonica, aka chromonica. This has a button on the right, which when pressed, will sharpen any note you play, blow or draw. It is actually ...


3

Trills can vary in their speed. They may also be played in or out of the time of the piece, depending on the performer's skill level and intent. In some cases the performer may start the trill slowly, then speed up the trill. In other cases the performer may want the trill to maintain a strict tempo match. There are also some stylistic choices to trilling ...


3

Tremolo is essentially a variation in volume, vibrato in pitch. They are nicely separated with bowed strings where "vibrato" is done by a variation in the fingering hand, and tremolo is done by a rapid back-and-forth of the bow on the same spot. However, lots of instruments have things they call "tremolo" or "vibrato". There is also the non-instrument ...


3

I have adopted Babu's suggestions. And I now make use of the metronome for two things: Checking that my playing has an even time. Discovering the tempo I'm playing at. Mostly, I'm just trying to make sure that I'm following (or working towards following) the tempo indication on the sheet music. The best increases in speed that I've made have been by ...


3

There's a jazz guitar instructor called Peter Farrell (who studied with George Benson) who has a take on this. He refers to it as "bee picking", presumably a reference to Flight of the Bumblebee. The preamble is that the pick should be slightly angled to the string to allow it to roll on and off smoothly. He then says to concentrate on "...


2

Here is the answer I found out at my own cost, at least this is the only way I could properly set up low action. The key was the angle of the bridge! I've been having issues with the EZ II since I purchased my Jem, and I even thought about reselling it as I suspected problems with the neck. No matter how I adjusted the truss rod, I always had fret buzz ...


2

+1 for the Carcassi Method. My teacher recommended that as well. As for tremolo picking, try this experiment: make a fist. In what order did you close your fingers? Pinky first? Index last? Then thumb? Probably. (That's how I do it.) Consequently, I found it easier to tremolo pick in the same order. For instance, in Leyenda, I would first use p-i, then p-m-...


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