22

This is apparently called a contrabass valve trombone, or sometimes a cimbasso if I am correct.


21

While the total length of a brass instrument is basically fixed, the ratio of conical to cylindrical piping is not set in stone for a trombone. It is true that the 6th partial is generally quite sharp, and needs to be lowered. There are several components that can affect the partials relative to one another, including: Mouthpiece cup depth Leadpipe (venturi)...


19

There are acoustical reasons for not wanting close voicing in the lower register; in short, the upper harmonics muddy each other up and fog up the sound. But in my experience, C4 is a really high limit; I can think of tons of scores with thirds below C4. Every musical environment is different, and sometimes you might want that slightly muddy sound. But if ...


19

This is a cimbasso (a valve contrabass trombone). The instrument is mainly used in Verdi's operas (and one opera each by Bellini and Puccini). The modern instrument has six rotary valves and is normally pitched in F, but there are also instruments in B-flat. Both instruments can be heard here: Mattis Cederberg of the West ...


17

A vamp is a repeating musical figure, like a guitar riff. In jazz, Latin jazz, and musical theater it’s often given for the accompaniment so that they can repeat as necessary during intros or solos, in which case it may be noted as “vamp until ready” or “vamp until cue.” Depending on the style and band, players may improvise on the vamp. The “open vamp” ...


16

you literally just point your bell into the stand, not directly touching it, but the sound should be muted by the stand


16

The "N.V" just means No Vibrato.


13

That is a bend or a dip. You make a clear attack on the note and then do a very slight glissando around a quarter or half step down and then return to the original pitch.


11

This is only for comfort. The part where you hold the trombone is not very ergonomical so we search for as comfortable position as possible, with control of the instrument. Try various hand positions yourself to see which works best for you. Ideally you should not lift you left shoulder at all (do check in a mirror, lifting left shoulder will with time lead ...


10

The notation shown in the video — the standard tremolo notation — is the correct way to indicate a flutter. In can (should) be supplemented with "f.t" (flutter tongue) for clarity. As long as a note has no tremolo, it will be played normally. For an extended passage, you can write "flutter" at the beginning and either use a dotted line (...


9

Closed vocings aren't bad, but you need to be aware of the register you are in no matter what you compose. In lower registers, having notes close together isn't always what you want. Specifically intervals that are supposed to have color like 3rds and 6ths both will sound "muddied" to most. Perfect internals typically don't observe this problem. This is also ...


9

It's a bend: an articulation mark representing a brief flattening of the note.The note is attacked in tune but is immediately flattened - by up to a semitone - before coming up to pitch again.


9

This is a massive topic that I'm not really qualified to talk about, but "length of tubing" is a highly idealized model. In actuality, every bend in the tube and every change in bore diameter will knock things away from this ideal. If an antinode for a harmonic sits close to some irregularity like this, the resonance will get modified in some way.


8

For trombone you'll typically see a number of mute markings, but the style of music changes what you'll frequently need. In traditional, classical music and other chamber style music you may see the term Con Sord or some similar Italian or even German markings (Con Sordino, Mit Dampfer, etc.). If a mute type is not stipulated, the vast majority of the time ...


8

There will be differences in the tone quality, because the baritone/euphonium is a conical bore instrument whereas the trombone is a cylindrical bore. (Generally speaking, this means that the trombone will have a brighter tone than the baritone/euphonium.) But in terms of range, the two instruments are pretty similar, and the baritone can certainly play the ...


8

Listening for cue parts in specifically the Bolero is difficult, because of many repetitions and subtle changes, so I fully understand your difficulty, and I too get lost most of the times I listen to this piece. As others mentioned, I would expect the conductor to help your section with this problem, as he has the overview. But I can also offer some other ...


8

Let me offer some alternate perspective besides the tuning issue referred to in the other answer. They're awkward to hold. The situation when operating the valves with your left hand is worse than a bass trombone: there's about the same (or more) mass in the valve section, and there are fewer points of contact for you to support the instrument. They're ...


8

To "clip" in this context means to "cut short". With brass instruments, this can especially mean not to use the tongue to suddenly cut off the air flow. Rather, the air flow should be allowed to stop "naturally" by simply not blowing.


7

Absolutely. JB Arban once said that people have the wrong idea about embouchure - that it's a fixed thing like a statue. He said that embouchure is fluid - you need to do what's right and what sounds good. I am not surprised that you have difficulties with flute after trombone; remember how each instrument works: The flute is like a fickle bottle - you ...


7

A trombone is the sum of its components. And the words of the economist, Thomas Sowell, "There are no solutions, only compromises..." applies to the trombone world as well. Part of why you might like the Bach are some of the things that you are trying to "fix." Similarly, part of the reason you liked the CL2000 valve may be because you also like the Conn ...


7

Aha! Pictures definitely help. So let's talk about this one component at a time Slide Your slide is all nickel slide. (Bach slides that are lightweight (LT42) are also made of a nickel-brass alloy, without oversleeves). The problem with nickel is that many people are allergic to it. Your cork barrel is pitted as is the part of the slide that you would ...


7

'Solo' is a featured passage for one player. 'Soli' is a featured passage for more than one player or instrument. It may mean the whole trombone section play it. Like 'Heads up, guys! You've got the tune!' Or that just one player on each part is to play. I think we can assume that if it's in the third part, at least SOMEONE from that section will ...


7

A lot of our 'knowledge' of overtones comes from textbooks describing the behaviour of a perfect, massless string or of an air column in a perfect cylindrical tube. Real instruments are more complicated than that! The wonderful thing about the trombone is that, unlike trumpet or other valved instruments - there's no great virtue in aiming to build it 'in ...


6

You really need to get more specific than "mouth muscles". The formation of your mouth and lips that is used to create a tone on the mouthpiece is called your embouchure (colloquially referred to as "chops" by many musicians). Once you identify what this is and what it feels like, as well as which muscles exactly are being used, it basically amounts to ...


6

Like the comments said, it's a combination of both. As a trombone player, we have the muscle memory to hit notes at what should be in tune, but what is in tune may also vary. You tune the notes based on what is in tune in context (surrounding ensemble/accompanist), the tuning will not always be A = 440, so you need to have the ability to hear tuning and ...


6

There are a number of instruments in the pitch class of a trombone and each of them have interesting and unique features. The Valve trombone bears the most resemblance to a slide trombone because in many cases, the valve section is interchangeable with the slide section to the extent that many of these models are sold with the valve section as an option. ...


6

In my experience, there is some truth to it. The tuba and trombone have two very different sounds, and a tuba player trying to sound like a trombone, however inadvertently, only leads to frustration on the part of a (good) ensemble leader. In short, the sound of a trombone naturally has a bit more edge to it, and it's only too easy for a young tubist to try ...


6

'Soli' generally refers to an exposed, soloistic part but played by several players or a whole section. Without seeing the score it's impossible to generalize, but it's possible that it's intended that only one player from each part plays. Your band director will explain what they want, but you should probably have the part prepared in case you have to play ...


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