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26

Excellent find! Trumpet, as well as the acoustically similar trombone, are very peculiar instruments when it comes to physics. They are cylindrical tubes closed at one end, so they should have a fundamental wavelength that's 4x the length of the tube, and then only generate odd overtones. Look at clarinet for an instrument that actually obeys this1. But ...


21

Vent. is an abbreviation for Ventil, which is the German for valve. Ord. probably denotes ordinary, for non-valved trumpets, i.e. bugles. If you look through the Vent. parts, they do feature chromatic notes, which would require valves. The Ord. parts are all bugle notes, except these bugles have a lowest open note which is an octave lower than today's ...


18

I'm a trumpet player who's played in many orchestras. The first thing to understand is that historically, the trumpet is a relatively new addition to the orchestra. Before the mid-19th century, metalworking wasn't sophisticated enough to build valves, so trumpets from before this time were more like bugles, unable to play fully chromatically. With a limited ...


18

At least for trumpet, yes, the lips really vibrate that quickly. For a high trumpet note, the lips may vibrate at more than 1000 vibrations per second. This is fast, but remember that the muscles are not contracting at that rate: the muscles in the brass player's lips exert almost constant tension, and it is the elastic and aerodynamic forces on the lips ...


17

I won't (nor could) speak as a trumpet player, but I'd like to give my own general answer as a musician. As many of us, I've been stuck in the last year and a half due to the current pandemic. Not only phisically (as a classical percussionist, I do not own many of the instruments I'd usually play) but even mentally: I struggled with the whole "ok, I ...


16

It's called a mute. Brass players place mutes in the bells of their instrument to affect it's volume and tone quality (timbre). There are several different kinds of mutes in existence, with different shapes and materials which produce different effects on the resulting sound. People have even used toilet plungers as mutes. This video provides a great ...


16

@BrianTowers beat me to the quote I was going to use, but the trumpet players I've worked with all have expressed the need to play daily. I found that after a particularly intense gig, a day off way helpful — even necessary. The thing for me that suffers first when I take a break is endurance. That can drop in a matter of days of no playing. However things ...


15

The quote I'm familiar with is If I miss a day's practice, God notices Miss two days practice and I notice Miss three days practice and the world notices Doing a search, the closest I find to this is this quote from the great violinist, Jascha Heifetz: If I don't practice one day, I know it; two days, the critics know it; three days, the public knows it. ...


14

Yes. They might be brash and full of bravado, but they will see the long term effects when they age. They will not be able to play for as long during their lifetime as they would if they were healthy. Quite simply: Wind instruments need wind. Smoking inhibits your ability to create wind. Therefore, reduced wind production reduces tone production, stamina,...


14

Yes, you did. But you shouldn't feel bad about it — the term "horns" is commonly used to mean a variety of overlapping things. For example: Horns, meaning wind instruments, as opposed to the rhythm section in a jazz combo. Horns, meaning brass instruments, as opposed to the reeds (i.e. woodwind) instruments. (Somewhat less common — more typical to say brass/...


14

The outer/larger slur is a phrase marking, letting you know that the entire passage constitutes a single musical idea. The inner slurs are similar, but indicating smaller units. One could think of the inner slurs as indicating words, and the outer slur as denoting a sentence. Part of the reason there are two sets is that there are some places in the phrase ...


13

While is very tempting to approach improvisation focusing on phrases and licks, your solo may sound very awkward if you play unrelated chunk of melodies/ideas without thinking about beginning/development/ending. One aspect I love - and judge to be very important - about jazz improvisation are 'motifs', and you can't really apply that to a single phrase. ...


13

Yes, the additional length required for each semitone drop is proportional to the original length. If adding valve 2 to an 'open' note is sufficient to drop a semitone, it will not be enough to drop a note that is already using valves 1 and 3. Or even just valve 1. This is addressed in several ways. Valves 1 & 2 theoretically add the same length of ...


12

As the horn section you met has demonstrated - smoking and brass playing are not completely incompatible. People can play brass, and play well, despite smoking, at least for a period. Smoking definitely damages your ability to breathe; it reduces lung capacity; it stiffens lung tissue; it narrows breathing passages; it causes excess mucus; it reduces blood ...


11

There is indeed a reason! The notes you play on a trumpet with a particular fingering come from the harmonic series, which is a series of tones based on the root, or fundamental frequency. The idea is that the harmonics (also called overtones) are whole-number multiples of the fundamental frequency. If the fundamental frequency of, say, your trumpet, is ...


11

Because valve #3 is normally tuned slightly flatter than #1 + #2. This is to do with the physical fact that each semitone down requires the tube length to increase by the same PROPORTION, not by the same fixed length. The real situation is complicated by most professional-quality instruments having finger-operated slides on valves #1 and #3, allowing them ...


10

I've been searching online, talking with musicians about this, and here are some techniques I retained, with some interrogations : Get out of scales from time to time Totally off-scale, no limit (really?) Play a riff and play it elsewhere For instance and play it off one half-tone higher, and then come back / play it a half-tone higher again Ascend and ...


10

I would just like to point out that those corks are there for three reasons. The first is to hold the mute inside your bell, the second is to protect the finish on the inner bell from being scratched by the metal of the mute, or vice-versa. The third and perhaps most important is to allow the air a way of getting out of your horn. If you look at the other ...


10

When I started playing trumpet, I soon realised that everything I played was a tone lower than written, which was fine if the other parts were written accordingly. however, stuff I wanted to play that was in a certain key wouldn't work, as I was a tone lower. so, I learned to play in two ways: one from the dots as writ, and two as from transposing it all a ...


10

Embouchure and valve manipulation can influence the exact pitch of a tone on all wind instruments. For proof, just listen to any jazz trumpet player! The effect is larger on some instruments than others, but it's easily large enough to switch between a just and a well-tempered third, for instance.


10

They are to control where the stop rod actually stops the slide — thus known as a "slide stopper". The nut closest the bell sets the actual stop point. The second nut should be turned until it is against the first nut to lock the first nut in place. To move the first nut, turn the second nut away from it to unlock the first nut. The third nut is ...


9

Overbite would only inhibit brass playing potential if your jaw caused your lips to close in a really odd way. You don't need straight teeth to play a brass instrument. If you're using your teeth / jaw to play brass, then you're headed for trouble. If your lips look like everyone else's when your mouth is closed / relaxed, then I can't anticipate you ...


9

It helps a lot, and indeed, the trumpet is much more difficult than the guitar if you have no perfect hearing. The issue is that your breathing technique affects the note that you're playing, and if you breathe incorrectly, the outcome will also be incorrect. If you are not able to hear where you go wrong, it's difficult to play perfectly. Regardless, I ...


9

You should start there while you're learning the basics, thinking of Bb as C, as others have said, but you probably shouldn't stop there. The disadvantage of not thinking in concert pitch is fairly small as long as you only play in wind bands and brass bands, but as soon as you step outside that, into orchestral, jazz, or nearly any other kind of music, it'...


9

A regular mute changes the colour of the sound. A silent brass mute (like the Yamaha one I've used for years) won't silence you but it substantially reduces the produced volume. The instrument does "feel" different when the mute is inserted - there's more back pressure and the intonation of some of the lower notes goes off a bit. But it still feels ...


8

The trumpet mouth piece is made up of 4 main sections: rim, cup, throat and backbore. (source: adhesis.com) All the following information comes from The Trumpet by John Wallace and Alexander Mcgraham, the Vincent Bach mouthpiece manual and my own experience as a trumpet player. A thin rim is good for tone and control of articulation but cuts into the lip. A ...


8

The main reason to not think in concert pitch, and the reason we write transposed parts for wind instruments is that in written pitch the fingerings remain the same for all instruments in the family. If you know the fingerings in written pitch, you automatically can play the piccolo trumpet (It's in Eb AFAIR), the C trumpet, the alto horn in Eb. If you think ...


8

Don't worry, everything is as expected. Trumpet is a transposing instrument. If you play the note that a trumpeter would call 'C', it's really a Bb. We say that a trumpet is written a major second higher than it sounds. You're not the first person to be confused by this. If you search for terms like 'transposing instrument' and 'concert pitch', you'll find ...


8

here might be your answer: https://physics.stackexchange.com/questions/246020/is-it-possible-for-a-harmonic-to-be-louder-than-the-fundamental-frequency/246023 It is not uncommon for some of the higher harmonics to have a larger amplitude. Take a look at the frequency spectrum of a trumpet for example. Trumpet Frequency Spectrum


8

Let me offer some alternate perspective besides the tuning issue referred to in the other answer. They're awkward to hold. The situation when operating the valves with your left hand is worse than a bass trombone: there's about the same (or more) mass in the valve section, and there are fewer points of contact for you to support the instrument. They're ...


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