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8

Like Dekkadeci, I'll note that the main body of the passage in question does not mention trumpets. Why is it that key-signatures are 'irrelevant' to horn? The tradition arose because natural horns always played as transposing instruments in the key of the piece; beginning in the late 18th or early 19th century, the transposition could change in the middle ...


7

I play trumpet and horn, and have played both in orchestras for many years. Both instruments used to not be fully chromatic (mainly playing their overtones) and so they'd be crooked into the key of the piece (usually). Thus, the part is transposed to read in C and the parts always end up with no key signature (or rather, the key signature of C major). Now, I ...


5

It's quite possible that those concert horn players are following an earlier music tradition where French horn parts were consistently not notated with key signatures, regardless of the home key of the piece. Implying such a music tradition exists, the Boosey & Hawkes-published scores of Edward Elgar's Pomp and Circumstance Marches No. 1-4, which were ...


2

Yes, historically valveless horns and trumpets were built (or adapted with interchangeable slides) in different keys, but always written 'in C'. A modern orchestral horn player will still get given parts for 'Horn in D', 'Horn in Eb' etc etc. and will transpose them on the fly for his modern 'Horn in F'. Which will probably be a 'Double horn in F/Bb'. ...


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