7

An addendum to leftaroundabout's answer. Never tighten the trussrod against the tension of the strings. Slacken them first. Never use the truss rod to pull the neck. Pull the neck manually & use the truss rod to take up the slack. Failing to follow these two simple rules can quite likely break the russ rod, or round off the nut, or in extreme cases ...


6

It does tighten up if I turn it clockwise The truss rod doesn't seem to be broken. I don't see much of a change in the relief of the neck. It seems to be dead straight all the time. Normally the neck should be a bit concave when the truss rod is completely loose. If not, the problem has nothing to do with the truss rud but with the neck itself. The truss ...


3

Your truss rod does not touch the strings or affect the tension on them, so it cannot be responsible for breaking your strings. If there is some problem with your guitar that is breaking the strings, it will be found where the guitar touches the string. If the strings tend to break at the nut, it's probably the nut breaking your strings. The same idea ...


3

Before you tighten the truss rod, it is imperative that you clamp the neck into the position you would like the neck to be. The purpose of the truss rod is not to pull the neck into position, but simply hold it in position after it has been moved there by other means. It is possible to damage your truss rod by attempting to force it to do the positioning of ...


3

I just had the same problem, nut was just too tight to get the last quarter turn to get the neck straight. What seemed to work well was graphite spray. DO NO SPRAY DIRECTLY IN, AT, OR NEAR THE GUITAR. This stuff stains like crazy, I use it for sticky locks. What I did was spray some on a Q-Tip over some paper towels until it is saturated then carefully put ...


2

If you intend to keep the guitar in that tuning permanently, it may indeed be a good idea to loosen the truss rod. The lower string tension will likely lead to the neck pulling back a bit, resulting in lower action – not something you want especially with those slack bass strings. But it depends on the instrument. If you switch tuning for just a single song,...


2

It could be one or more of a variety of problems. Simply raising the bridge (if at all possible) on the lower strings' side may solve it. Chances are, the bridge is fixed, so maybe not. Look down the guitar from bridge to head (or the opposite way) and you may see the neck is twisted. If so, there's little to be done. It could just be that there's not ...


2

Considering the fact that its the 4th fret that's buzzing, you might want to give it a bit more relief, thus turning it counterclockwise. But also check if your saddle and you nut are properly set. If the other strings don't have this problem it might be that your saddle is uneven or your nut is filed wrong. or it could be that your frets are not leveled


2

Just as Victor pointed out, that picture has it backwards. My suggestion is to play the guitar for a few more days, then consider slightly loosening the truss rod (turn it counter-clockwise 1/6th of a turn) and see if that fixes the buzz. If the action at the middle of the neck is uncomfortably high, you've gone too far. I would like to point out that it is ...


2

"Can anybody point out what my problem with my guitar might be?” Yes, it might be that the lighter gauge strings are sitting too deep in the nut slots. If the guitar was set up for heavier gauge strings, the slots will be wider than optimal for the new, lighter set, thus the strings will sit deeper and be too close to the frets. This can cause the ...


2

The truss rod on real Strats is at the other end. You can't even see it until you take the scratch plate off, or reach it until you loosen the neck. You got an easy one there ;) and yes, get a long key with a ball-end, like the Fender one. All you're fighting with after that is they put an 'overkill' string-guide in the way. The long handle means you're not ...


2

Revision two. I was half asleep the first time & gave poor advice. Looks like it's bent backwards from that photo, but that may depend on the camera lens & angle the picture was taken, so be certain before you make any adjustment. Use a steel rule laid edgewise down the neck, or hold a string down at the 1st & 12th fret to judge. Don't start ...


1

If you're really concerned after doing what others suggest, then take off the neck completely, and you'll be able to see what the trussrod is doing (or not).


1

If it is as the other answer says, then loosening the truss rod would alleviate it, and there's no danger of breaking anything. The next simple solution would be to adjust the height of the bridge, using the screws on the saddles, assuming it's a Stratalike. There will be two tiny screws, usually moved using an Allen key, either side of the strings, where ...


1

It sound like as Tom said fret buzz. I think you should take your guitar to a local lutier instead of trying to fix it by yourself because truss rod is very easy to break and it is quite expensive to fix it. If you are not very experienced with it you should take it to a lutiher. Furthermore electric guitars are designed to play together with an amplifier. ...


1

I like to use 3 in 1 oil to lubricate my truss rod threads, but I squirt some on a Q-tip and lubricate the threads after the nut has been removed. I try very hard to avoid getting oil on the wood around the truss rod. Graphite is a good dry lubricant but it needs to be used carefully and very sparingly to avoid making a real mess. This is what has worked for ...


1

If the guitar is new or recently built, and played fine before you bought it, then you shouldn't have to "max out" the truss rod. It does not require large turns to have an effect. You don't need a dual-action rod to play with light gauge strings. I highly recommend putting it back to the way it was, if you can remember how many times you turned it, and ...


1

Basically, the truss rod battles the string tension. By loosening the truss rod, the string tension takes over and bows the neck. By tightening the truss rod, it takes over and the neck back bows. If it's concave like a bow, tighten it. If it's bending the opposite way, loosen. I believe that image is backwards. A U shape means the strings are taking ...


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