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12

This is a famous question for tuba players, but I'm not sure there's a single answer for you; I ultimately think it depends on what you want to privilege. (And before I proceed with my answer, I'll go ahead and say that I'm a tubist who only owns a CC, even though I'd love to own an F! I subbed for some professional orchestras back in the day, but these days ...


6

In my experience, there is some truth to it. The tuba and trombone have two very different sounds, and a tuba player trying to sound like a trombone, however inadvertently, only leads to frustration on the part of a (good) ensemble leader. In short, the sound of a trombone naturally has a bit more edge to it, and it's only too easy for a young tubist to try ...


6

If the instrument is in good repair, then the inside of the slide should be air tight with the valve not pressed. Moving the slide would then cause there to be a pressure differential. At best, this makes it hard to accurately move the slide as the pressure wants to move the slide back to where it was, and causes a loud 'pop' when the valve is pressed and ...


6

When your teacher says "bring the band together", he is basically just trying to remind you that the rest of the band is building up from your bass sound. One of my teachers told me that the tuba and lower brass section is like the base of a pyramid, in a sense, because other instruments will follow your bass tone. It's like the other players are just ...


5

Do not worry, this is a very common problem on tuba. The low range of the tuba takes a long time to develop and will naturally sound better over time - given that you play regularly. Something I always tell students, is that you have to balance your range. If you want to increase your low range, you need to increase your high range as well - you can't do ...


5

Welcome to the wonderful world of transposing instruments! Bass clef tuba parts are non-transposing. The note that you read is the note that you play. If you read a 'B♭', the note that the arranger wants you to play is really a B♭. Simple. Treble Clef E♭ parts are transposing. If you read a 'B♭', the note that the arranger wants you to play is really a D♭. ...


4

Solo voices in the upper range may come in a beat late and catch up, they may play wrong notes and swing back into the right ones and so on. Of course, if it is done accidentally rather than with deliberation and consistency and intelligence, it will be apparent. But they won't be taking the band down with them in general. Drums and bass don't have that ...


4

Possibly ask or find out if your bass guitarist has a five or six string bass (ie one with a low B string). That means you won't necessarily have to write notes below an E one ledger line below bass clef up an octave. As someone who has played a lot as an upright or electric bassist in unison with low brass instruments I personally have to remember to ...


4

The best solution would be to buy a tuba stand. It sits on the ground between your legs and has a curved portion that rests right in front of your chair where you place the tuba: Is there a reason you feel that you're "supposed" to sit at the front of the seat? I'm a tuba player myself, and I sit at the back of the chair with the tuba sitting on the chair. ...


3

In purely taxonomic terms, instruments are classified into families where the members are very similar in all respects except for size. Consider some of the woodwind families: Clarinets commonly come in sizes from E♭ soprano to B♭ contrabass, which all have exactly the same fingerings (ignoring low range extensions) and essentially work the same way. Flutes ...


3

In addition to other brilliant answers here, I would also point out another benefit of generally being able to read concert pitch bass clef. From time to time, we have compositions that include parts written for contrabass or string bass, and those are naturally written in C natural. If there are important sections in those parts that are missing in the ...


2

In the British brass band tradition, Eb and Bb bass (that's what they call a tuba) have specific parts, and follow the system where all valved instruments read transposed treble clef, thus allowing easy movement between instruments - learn the fingerings for one, you've learnt them all. (No need to discuss the bass trombone anomaly now.) In orchestra, ...


2

I have only once taken apart a trumpet before so I don't really KNOW the answer to your question, but since no one else has helped I'll tell you how I would try to get out of your predicament. Are the valve cylinders different sizes? The largest spring can't fit into a smaller hole, so I would try to find where the largest spring goes first, and then work to ...


2

Yes. When cleaning the tuba (in the sense of a full cleaning of the instrument), you should also take out the springs in order to clean properly. This is for more easily cleaning both the springs and also the bottom interior of the housing.


2

Keeping them exactly equal has some pros and cons. For instance, if one of them cannot show up to a gig, it's very good to have redundancy. But if they are not perfectly in tune and tight in rhythm, it sounds a bit muddy. To be sure you will always have the needed part I would print a copy for both of the other part. (but that's not the point you're asking. ...


1

One reason may be that he'll need to learn two clefs for reading. Although trombonists generally tend to read all over the staves. If it's the same clef initially at least, it would reinforce the notes. Embouchures may be slightly different - but they're different instruments, held differently, doing different jobs in an orchestra. Just like guitar and bass ...


1

The fundamental question is to understand the the effect that one is trying to achieve in terms of the of sound quality of the different instruments. A wind instrument such as the tuba produces a sustained tone that can also be altered in amplitude during its duration. A string instrument that is plucked such as a bass guitar is inherently percussive in ...


1

In addition, just to clarify a bit, tuba players also are responsible for keeping a strong sense of time and usually play on the strong beats. I would recommend working on looking up from the music in order to stay in sync with the conductor.


1

Short answer, no. To oil it, first unscrew the top valve cap and remove piston. Next wipe off the old oil. Apply the new oil to the piston. Replace piston to valve casing and re-screw top valve cap. Screw the finger-piece clockwise until it stops. This aligns the piston correctly in the casing. Press and depress key quickly to work oil around. You don't ...


1

Concert band music always contains two euphonium parts - one bass clef part at true pitch and one treble clef part transposed for a Bb instrument. I assume that this is done because of the large number of euphonium players who started off their musical career by reading treble clef euphonium parts in brass bands or in Salvation Army bands. In 100-year-...


1

An observation from a tuba learner: when I paid attention to my teacher's tip to keep the fingers in place and keep a key still depressed if the next finger combination required it, I did play faster. What I mean is: if the first finger combination is 1+2 and then the next is 1+3, keep the 1st key depressed then just let go of 2nd finger and replace it by ...


1

The only really WRONG thing you can do is wrap your hand round the side of the valve casings, so that your fingers are clawing at the valves. Forget any idea of holding the instrument with the hand that does the fingering. Keep the hand free. I suspect you need to hold your elbow rather higher. Difficult to explain. Your teacher will show you easily.


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