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19

Briefly, yes, a harder picked note gives a higher pitch. The reason for this is that picking harder stretches the string further, and a stretched string has higher tension, and therefore higher pitch. This higher pitch rapidly settles down, but is one of those things to be aware of when tuning a guitar. Light picking gives you a much more accurate tuning ...


14

Some tuning apps or outboard tuners have a transpose function which may have been inadvertently activated because all your intervals are off by a Perfect 4th. However, if you are not familiar with how a tuned guitar should sound then you may be off by that amount. Try comparing your guitar‘s pitch to this or a similar video to see if you’re in the ballpark ...


8

It sounds like you're new to the guitar, and there are a variety of things that could be causing the problem. Your best bet will be to go to someone you know who has guitar experience, or take the guitar to a music or guitar store, and ask them to check it for you: to make sure the instrument is set up correctly, that your tuner is working, and to help you ...


8

The most probable explanation is that you have tuned exactly one fourth down from standard tuning. The tuner does not know which string you pick, so when it hears a B, it shows that B string is played, when it hears a D it shows D and so on.


5

First, replace the strings Old strings will not, ever, stay in tune. They physically can't, because of the way they degrade over time. Strings over a year old must always be changed, even if no-one touched the instrument in that time. (Instruments played regularly, you might only get a month out of a set. Pro musicians might put a new set on for every gig. ...


5

Some tuners will be configured for a specific instrument, and only show the notes that the instrument uses. For example a "violin only" tuner would only show the notes G D A E on the tuner. Tuners that show every half step / semitone are called chromatic tuners and give you the closest note name to pitch you are playing. In some cases a tuner will have ...


4

Evidently the strings are so out of tune that the tuner can't know anymore which is supposed to be which. Lucky that it did recognise the 6th string, because from that you can easily tune all other strings by ear. Just compare the pitch that's produced when fingering the low E-string (6th string) at 5th fret with the empty A-string (5th string). It should ...


3

Here are two methods to match your guitar to the video: one way with the tuner (using the 40-cent adjustment cited in the OP) and one without the tuner. Recalibrating the tuner According to the SN-8 user manual, to change the pitch calibration, one should push the round "PITCH CAL" button on the back side of the tuner and immediately press either ...


3

The frequency of C will always be relative to your chosen A. Depending on your tuning system, it will be somewhere around 1.2 times the frequency, a ratio of 6:5. A justly-tuned minor third has exactly that ratio, while the ratio of an equal-tempered minor third is the fourth root of two, which is about 1.1892. A Pythagorean minor third is 32:27, or about ...


3

A = 440Hz has become close to a standard tuning pitch throughout several parts of the world. However, A, historically, has been several other pitches in different parts of the world, and is still not exactly 440Hz when one considers various orchestras' tuning in various locations. However - as long as everyone who is playing together in a particular ...


3

No, it's useless. You need to tune to the orchestra, not to a predefined frequency.


3

I was going to comment, but found too many interesting pages. Please keep in mind that forum pages, including the ones listed here, can be full of wrongness. First, another Google funny: "did you mean: violin pitch change with excessive bowel pressure?" . (No :-) , I wanted "...bow pressure" ). Meanwhile, check out Why does plucked and bowed string of ...


3

Tuners are generally set at A=440Hz. Concert pitch. With so many guitarists tuning down these days, the tuner can be reset so that the whole guitar is one semitone low,(b) as in Eb for top and bottom, or down to D, (bb),where the guitar is one tone lower than standard. So, your tuner has 3 settings - standard, one semitone flat, or one tone flat.


3

If the strings are properly in place, my guess is that the string is either too tight or too loose. So, instead of the usual E that it's supposed to be, you see a B. Just tune it until it gets to E. Just make sure to understand if you have to loosen it or tighten it. It might help you to find someone who knows how to properly tune a guitar so as to show you....


2

Using Equal Temperament There are a few things to consider when building a pentatonic scale. It looks like you used the formula for equal temperament in building your table, which is fn = f0 * (21/12)n Where f0 is a known frequency (usually A440) and n is the number of halfsteps you are from f0. (See here for more info.) | Google can do this math for ...


2

There should be a 1 as well on your tuner. I also have such a tuner made by Sanchez. The numbers represent the strings, 1 being the high E string and 6 the low E string. These tuners' displays sometimes change colours according to the pitch of the string, yellow for below tone, green for in tune and red for over tensioned string. The issue is that the range ...


2

I want to commend you on providing a child with a musical instrument and encouraging them to learn to play. Ukelele is a good first instrument for a child. Hopefully the seed of inspiration you are planting now will lead to a lifelong pursuit of music and musicianship. Yes a clip on tuner should work just fine on a plastic uke. The are extremely sensitive ...


2

Tuning a 12 string should actually be very simple. If you can tune a 6 string, tuning the first string of each pair is exactly the same. Use your tuner exactly as you normally would. On an expensive 12 string, tuning the other 6 is also straightforward - the unwound pairs are unison tuned, and the wound pairs are an octave apart (as per @KirkA's comment), ...


2

I think the main problem in using a piano for Indian music is that quarter tones are often employed. For other instruments, special versions are sometimes made specifically to add them in addition to the normal half-step distances between notes. It would be easy for a trombone to handle it, through the player would have to learn new slide positions. Since ...


2

That interval is a bit less than a cent wider than a syntonic comma. I suspect that the instrument is set to "just intonation" or to some temperament. Also check the controller to make sure it's not sending any pitch modification in the midi message.


2

From the comments provided by @musicamante, it sounds like you don't have a problem with your setup, but that the strings library you are using has some out of tune notes. This is also suggested by your comment that some other notes are out of tune, but by different amounts. (If all notes were equally out of tune, this would suggest some kind of global ...


1

One possible explanation is that you have a 7 string guitar. Most 7-strings have the lowest string tuned to B, and the remaining 6 strings tuned as a regular guitar. When you say all strings are off by a fourth (which is the tuning interval between guitar strings), this sounds like it's a possibility. So if the guitar does have 7 strings, you should expect ...


1

I haven't tried that plugin with Audacity but I have used it with Tracktion and now Waveform. I've had it not respond like this, where it's properly configured but just not "hearing" the audio that's flowing through it. In Tracktion, I've found that restarting the software usually fixes it. I know this doesn't answer the question, but it may be ...


1

There could be many issues with your guitar that may cause these issues, but off the top of my head, it just sounds like your new strings haven't fully stretched yet. If you put new strings on a guitar or bass, they will stretch a little from where you first tuned them, after playing and retuning, you should find that they hold their tune a lot better. ...


1

I had originally deleted my answer but decided to edit it and post something because there seems to be a lot of focus on string slippage but first, steel strings don’t take long to stretch if they are installed correctly and second, stretching strings won’t cause a bridge to rise. The fact that the bridge is rising tells me the real issue is your new ...


1

I've found the answer by myself. It's not very visible on the photo I've posted in the question, but there's two icons by the sides of the display. One is a fork icon and the other looks like an empty set icon. These are both physical buttons. They are kinda mushy and I first thought I was breaking the screen by pressing on them, but they are. Not sure what ...


1

Attach the clip to the head of the guitar, play each string and the tuner will tell what note it's sounding. Fat to thin, aim for E A D G B and E, but be careful you're in the right octave for each string. The 'C' option may make the difference, as it's not transpositional, so switch to that over the others.


1

It is not the way forward. You need to train your ears to listen to the notes properly. Get a cheap keyboard - which will be in tune, and listen to the different notes, and how they work with each other. It will take some time to get good, pure, in tune notes on your trumpet, but using an app or tuner is not the normal way to go.


1

In this situation they are most likely interchangeable. Pitch in musical terms is related to frequency - how high or low a sound is. 'Lower' is a better parameter than 'deeper' here.To tune an instrument, its pitch may be altered. Fairly obviously, a 'tune' musically speaking, is a melody - the sort of thing one would whistle, sing or play. So, your knob ...


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