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0

Yes, but it will be true of any tuning provided you can play all six strings. Even in standard tuning you could play, for example, open E or a barred A at the fifth fret. Both cover all six strings. You could play a variety of string groupings to get partial or full triads in various octaves. When you play with open tunings there is a sort of benefit in ...


4

The idea of DADF♯AD is just that. Use the bottom 3, barred wherever, to make a 'power chord'. Use all three notes from a major triad, barred wherever, to make that major chord. Thicken it by doubling any of the notes, particularly on the 6th, 4th and top strings (basically including M3 found on the 3rd string). Any major chord can be played using a simple ...


3

Yes, absolutely. You see Drop-D or similar tunings on, for example, metal songs just so you have one-finger power chords. And yes, you get different voicings from different strings. Playing a six-string "cowboy" chord will give you multiple roots, fifths and thirds. Sometimes that's great — it's the great folky sound — but you don't need to play ...


5

I don’t play open tunings, but your assessment makes sense to me for any open tuning. Since the guitar is tuned such that all notes played at the same fret are chord tones, you could play any number of combinations of the strings at a single fret and they would at least be partials or inversions of the same chord. So in short, yes.


4

I emailed customer support at Fender with this question. Here’s the answer from one of their Senior Gear Advisors: That is odd. I would disregard that suggestion. I never do that and have never had a problem. So the answer, straight from Fender, is that there is no reason to tune down to pitch with locking tuners. Carry on.


0

Locking tuners are also useful for keeping string stable while you do the fine tuning and intonation adjustments on certain terms. For floating bridges like a Floyd Rose you don't want the strings to move while you are getting the details of the bridge correct. You lock the tuners so that the strings don't move, you get the setup correct and then you lock ...


2

I agree with DrMayhem. In addition, tuning down means over-tensioning strings which hastens their demise. tuning down means releasing tension, and that relaxation is slower to reach a stable situation than when tuning up and increasing tension (the difference is relatively small and varies with string type). I'm not talking about brand-new strings, where ...


7

Locking tuners do absolutely nothing for tuning stability. Their sole purpose is to make string changes quick and neat. So as Todd commented, the real issue that requires tuning up to pitch, nut or tree friction, is no different when you use locking tuners. For interest I had a look at various experienced guitarist's blogs, and all said it was mostly ...


2

Different playing styles require different string tensions. Styles that require more bending would be lighter, while rhythm and slide playing would tend heavier. There's a rough center around 10-46 for electric, but what you prefer will vary. I mean, B.B. King played very light strings and SRV played very heavy strings, both playing electric blues. There are ...


4

I'll relate a situation I once experienced and maybe it will be of some help to you. Many years ago I picked up an old acoustic that needed quite a bit of work to make it something I wanted to play. One of the things I noticed right off was how loose the tuners were. Without a second thought I grabbed a screwdriver and cinched everything up nice and tight. ...


2

From the comments provided by @musicamante, it sounds like you don't have a problem with your setup, but that the strings library you are using has some out of tune notes. This is also suggested by your comment that some other notes are out of tune, but by different amounts. (If all notes were equally out of tune, this would suggest some kind of global ...


2

That interval is a bit less than a cent wider than a syntonic comma. I suspect that the instrument is set to "just intonation" or to some temperament. Also check the controller to make sure it's not sending any pitch modification in the midi message.


1

Does the spacing of frets on a guitar solely depend on the length of the string? Meaning if I have multiple guitars of different shapes and materials, but all of the guitars have the same length of string, will their fret spacing be identical? Yes.* ‡ Two guitars with the same scale length will have the same fret position. You may find that, on a perfectly-...


7

Sound pitch increases with logarithm of frequency, which makes calculations somewhat non-intuitive. For this reason pitch is often given in the units of cents, which are additive. Number of cents of interval between frequencies f and f₀ is calculated as x = 1200 · log₂(f/f₀). For example, an octave, or f/f₀ = 2 has 1200·log₂(2) = 1200·1 = 1200 cents. An ...


14

The problem is that intervals are ratios, so using subtraction to calculate the "extra" interval (frequency) is the wrong operation. The "extra" interval is ~ 1.014. (3/2)12 / 27 = 129.746337890625 / 128 = 1.0136432647705078125 One quarter of a semitone is In equal temperament ~ 1.015 (21/12)1/4 = 21/48 = 1.0145453349 In Pythagorean ...


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