New answers tagged

1

No need to spend as much as $1000! If you have a Mac, I would recommend investing in a decent MIDI keyboard (prioritizing touch and feel), an audio interface, and software that allows you to use many different piano and keyboard samples. For the keyboard, I would visit a music store in person and try them out until you find one whose touch you like. At ...


3

Any decent digital piano these days can be tuned any way you want, shift octaves, split the keyboard in two or more sections, etc. What instead changes quite a bit from one model to the next is the quality of the weighed keys system, and secondarily, the quality of the internal sound samples. Therefore, if it were for me, I would want to personally try ...


0

You will only know when the tuning has settled. Since it's providing less tension on the neck, it won't harm the guitar, but when the action and intonation are sorted, you may find the strings rattle on the fretwires at some points. That's the time to adjust. To keep that sort of tuning, it migt be a good idea to consider what gauge strings are needed, ...


2

If you intend to keep the guitar in that tuning permanently, it may indeed be a good idea to loosen the truss rod. The lower string tension will likely lead to the neck pulling back a bit, resulting in lower action – not something you want especially with those slack bass strings. But it depends on the instrument. If you switch tuning for just a single song,...


0

With one instrument, unless someone has (really precise) perfect pitch, the absolute pitch of one note the person is singing is difficult to observe, nor does it usually make a difference. However, since music is made out of more than just single notes, the relationship between different pitches is objectively measurable and meaningful. Musical intervals ...


1

As you probably discovered by now the solution is to tune guitar in perfect fourths a half step down from E-A-d-g-c-f. Then, as you read TABs you raise half step positions on the lower four strings. On Linux operating system there is a TuxGuitar program in which you can specify tuning, and TABs are modified automatically for your tuning.


2

Being in tune on one level means if the pitch to sing is A4 - 440 Hz - then the singer is supposed to sing A4 - 440 Hz. Most can't measure Hz with their ears, you would use some electronic device to measure it. But this kind of measure will not account for vibrato, slides, partially voiced notes, etc. which are all part of good, expressive singing. In other ...


1

So you want to verify the recording? Use melody.ml to separate the vocals from the guitar. Use an app like VocalPitchMonitor to get a graphical representation of the vocal pitch. Off-pitch spots should be obvious.


3

I would try loading the recording into a Melodyne trial, and see if that picks out the voice from the recording reasonably cleanly. If it does, you should be able to see if it is in tune - and maybe even fix the tuning, if you wish!


1

You tell him to sing the note, you play the note on the piano. If the sounds the singer makes sounds the same as the piano, he is in tune, for as long as the piano is in tune, as well.


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If you are using a chromatic tuner, just match every string with the tuning indication, without thinking about semitones. In any case, it would be -5, -1, +2, -1, 0 0. In order to prevent the low string from buzzing, consider changing to an heavier gauge one if you plan to play in this tuning often. Btw here it mentions B B D F# B D, but of course you ...


1

The first thing I would get checked would be the action on the guitar. If it is high, the capo will stretch the strings out of tune. That can be adjusted. Another thing that can cause sharpening with a capo is large frets. Even with a well adjusted action, a capo and large frets can result in sharpening the note. Large frets have their own advantages so the ...


-1

I cannot tune my A string to A4. It's in a state that if I go beyond G4, it will break. That's not too surprising. G4 is almost an octave above A4. If you manage to get the string all the way up to G4 then you are trying to tune it to A5 not A4.


1

There could be many issues with your guitar that may cause these issues, but off the top of my head, it just sounds like your new strings haven't fully stretched yet. If you put new strings on a guitar or bass, they will stretch a little from where you first tuned them, after playing and retuning, you should find that they hold their tune a lot better. ...


1

I had originally deleted my answer but decided to edit it and post something because there seems to be a lot of focus on string slippage but first, steel strings don’t take long to stretch if they are installed correctly and second, stretching strings won’t cause a bridge to rise. The fact that the bridge is rising tells me the real issue is your new ...


2

How high the harmonic is above the open string isn’t the primary issue, it’s the natures of the partials themselves. The 2nd partial harmonic an octave higher should be a true octave above the open string. This will be true, therefore, of all doublings of two. The fourth, eighth and (if you can find it) sixteenth partials have the same relationship to the ...


0

I think it depends on what you are tuning to. In an orchestra? usually, you tune to the 1st violin? Playing in a jazz combo you would usually tune to the piano if you have an upright or a grand. If you playing rock, make sure everyone tunes to a tuner. Playing along with recordings? well that's a little different, I've often had to adjust my tuning to be in ...


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The letters refer to the names of the strings on the guitar. The number refers to the fret. Usually the low e is an E and the high e is an e, so there are differences, visually. So if I said E2, you would play the low E string 2nd fret. This is called guitar tab (tablature). I hope this answers your questions. If now, ask more.


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