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Has it been like that all the time you've had it? How did you tune it - with a tuner, by ear, against another instrument? What bass is it, and what gauge strings are on now? All points which are needed to give any helpful answers. Going on the sparse information rendered, all I can suggest is you tuned the bottom string an octave too low. It wouldn't be the ...


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You probably did nothing wrong, and normality is more a matter of taste. If you feel that this string is too loose for you to be happy with maybe you should consider getting an higher gauge string. It will require more tension in order to achieve the same pitch.


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There's a lot to playing slide that becomes much easier when you tune to an open tuning, especially when you're playing and accompanying yourself. However, a triad (root, third and fifth) comes for free on the second, third and fourth strings of a guitar in standard tuning, making it easy to jump between bottleneck and standard playing. You might want to ...


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Yes - and no. Standard tuning will mean judicious angling of the bottleneck or whatever's being used. A perpendicular angle will give a minor triad on the top 3 strings, but moving it to an angle can produce a major one - albeit not spot on in tune.It'll also give a major triad (the relative major at the same fret, and the VII either 5 or 7 frets away)- ...


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This is of course up to you how you tune the guitar, but slide guitar players often use open tunings, to make the most use of the slide touching several strings perpendicularly. See e.g. What is an "open tuning"?


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So many contrasting perceptions here! One morning I woke with a tune in my head: the D-E-C-C-A radio ad jingle from 30 years before. Checked with piano, I was on-pitch. Decided to learn to sing that C of 'Decca' at will - and after about a year reached about 90 percent reliability. It's similar now, 20 years on, following refreshed practice. Not true ...


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In general, the higher partials on a piano tend to be more inharmonic than the lower partials, so I would expect that in the circumstance you indicated, the 4th partial of A3 would be sharper than the 2nd partial of A4. But, see Figure 5, page 9 of this paper: Inharmonicity of Piano Strings, Simon Hendry, October 2008 : Although the graph only spans one ...


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A temperament is what you get when you compromise the tuning of a keyboard or fretted string instrument to "fix" the out of tune intervals that result from tuning other intervals "purely" or "justly," that is, tuning the two pitches so a harmonic of one coincides with a harmonic of the other. A temperament is a kind of tuning ...


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They are often used interchangeably, but they are technically different. Tuning system is a broad term meaning any system of tuning an instrument. Temperament is a set of adjustments (temperaments) to a tuning system to meet specific musical requirements. For example, "just intonation" is a tuning system involving "pure" intervals. &...


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The one I used to play around 40 yrs ago was a soprano pan, basically tuned to key D. It was divided into around two octaves, diatonically. Pretty sure there were no chromatics on it then. There would probably be more resonance without chromatics.


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If a key sticks, we might be able to blame a change of humidity. But beware of imitating your tuner - he wasn't 'cleaning' the pin holes, he was loosening them by compressing the felt. When you depress a piano key very slowly it isn't MEANT to play a note. You have to impart enough velocity to 'throw' the hammer at the string. I suspect a more resonant ...


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