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1

John Gowers, in his answer, explained how the intervals C-C♯ and C-D♭ can have frequency ratios 25:24 and 16:15. 25:24 is ~70.67 cents and 16:15 is ~111.73 cents. The difference is 41.06 cents, thus vindicating the text quoted by the OP. We should not assume Pythagorean tuning, that is, building all intervals from octaves and pure perfect fifths (frequency ...


1

I don't mean ear training - naming intervals, or playing back melodic phrases by ear. I mean - becoming better at noticing when you are perhaps 20 or 30 cents out on a note. For instance if I play certain octave intervals on saxophone they do tend to be slightly wide. It is all to easy to get used to that. I am interested in how to become more aware of it. ...


2

I concur with the other answers that you are looking for movable system ear training, even if all you want is to improve your internal tuner. As Richard pointed out, a movable system teaches you the function of each note within the context of the scale. Once you have a feeling for this function, you will have a much easier time recognizing when you are not ...


3

I agree with Richard learning and training solfege (movable do re mi) practicing all scales and modes and intervals from the same tone. But there is another training that was the greatest benefit to me: By trying to play or notate melodies, tunes of well known songs, and controlling my writing with an instrument. Later you can continue with your own ...


6

The absolute best exercise to train your relative pitch is to sing music on some kind of movable system. This is because movable systems—like movable do and scale-degree numbers—teach you the function of what you're singing, which is ultimately exactly what relative pitch is. (Fixed systems, like fixed do, do not teach function, which is why I believe it's ...


0

There are some excellent suggestions at https://appsreeds.com/pages/dealing-with-a-sharp-high-g (Some of which you’ve tried already). The other thing to say is that practice chanters aren’t always made to the most exacting of standards, so it may be something that can’t be fixed like an incorrect hole placement, a resonating chamber that has not been ...


5

I'm mainly providing an answer to address some comments about Wikipedia not providing adequate sources and the idea that "concert pitch" is supposedly not used to refer to a pitch standard (but rather only in the transposing instrument sense). There has also been speculation that dictionary writers just made the first meaning up. Apologies to OP if this is ...


4

Concert pitch is a concept that is useful when dealing with transposing instruments. It denotes the pitch system of non-transposing instruments, which you can think of as a common language. This is in contrast to "written pitch," which is each instrument's own language, as it were. If you are talking about a horn part, and you mention the pitch C♯, it's ...


10

Two Definitions The problem you appear to be running into is that there are two different definitions for the term "concert pitch": The pitch as described using a non-transposing instrument, such as a piano. Sometimes the word "pitch" is replaced with a specific note name to describe the exact note, e.g. Concert B♭. The frequency and pitch name that a ...


7

if you look at the saxophone family each instrument produces a different note when playing a C fingering. Tenor saxes are B♭ instruments. So if you play a C fingering on a tenor you will hear concert pitch B♭. Alto sax is an E♭ instrument. So if you play a C fingering on a alto you will hear an E♭ concert. This is a problem if you say ...


1

There is no actual pitch that is concert pitch. That's why we refer to it as concert pitch. It's whatever pitch is decided that the whole orchestra - all musicians - will tune to in order to be 'in tune' with each other Often it happens to be A=440Hz, but that's not actually what's known as 'concert pitch'. It may be so in some parts of the world, but it ...


0

“Give me an A!” But which A? Different violinists would provide different A, from instrument to instrument andfrom orchestra to orchestra, from land to land, from town to town, from time to time ... if not orchestras worldwide would have in unison defined a standard pitch. And this is not so long ago. You can imagine what problems musicians would have in ...


3

Good answers here, I would add that some violins have have little knobs called "fine tuners" which make small adjustments to the tuning much easier. You may be able to add these to an existing instrument at a violin shop, I'm not sure of the specifics. Other than that waiting for the strings to get broken in can help, and if you are experiencing intense ...


2

I think it may be due to the weather and violin strings go out of time very easily due to this. Make sure to store the violin somewhere with moderate temperature and with less humidity. Violins are prone to getting out of tune if there is too much of an imbalance in the temperature. Practise somewhere with moderate temperature and try not to switch around ...


0

Which programming language do you use? I have created a mainly bug to bug compatible Scala parser for Mutabor (C++/Bison/Flex). And there is a book “The Mathematical theory of tone systems” by Jan Haluška which countains lots of tunings.


6

leftaroundabout touched on this briefly but no one else has, so I thought I'd point it out specifically. The tuning knobs may be loose. My daughter's first guitar experienced this. I would tune it up and it would immediately slip. Coming from a guitar world, I'm used to ratcheted tuners, but the violin appears to just rely on friction alone to keep the knob ...


4

One thing you can do is not tune adjacent strings consecutively. Tune the outer strings, then inner, or skip a string. My experience is with guitar, where there are more strings and a wider fingerboard, but tuning this way helps to even out the tension across the neck and make tuning more stable.


0

Most tunings in western music can be (and were, historically) derived mathematically. You can not copyright mathematics. You can certainly copyright a document containing mathematics (e.g. a math textbook) but the copyright is of the arrangement of the text on the page, not of the maths itself. So IMO you can include any tunings you like in your software ...


6

My husband suspects (...) that it is because it is new and the strings are so new. Is that possible? Not only possible, but almost always generates a great deal of disappointment with new strings on a variety of string instruments. The instrument itself being new is less important. Don't worry, the strings will settle in a few days. Or week. Just keep ...


6

Yes, your instrument will require more tuning from its original set up. As it settles in it will require less tuning to get it in tune, but all string instruments require regular tuning. Initially the strings haven't been stretched yet, so under tension they will "relax" some as they stretch out. Even steel strings will do this, although less than nylon ...


20

Alas, string instruments notoriously lose tuning for seemingly trivial reasons, especially classical guitars and wooden bowed strings. Temperature, humidity, looking at it... so, better get used to tuning. Good news is, like with the actual playing, practising tuning helps getting it done a lot quicker! Experienced players can completely re-string and tune ...


7

The strings should have been tuned up to pitch before it was packed up for sale, otherwise there is a risk that something would shift out of alignment. You may not realize that the bridge, the tail piece, and the internal "sound post" that stops the top and bottom of the instrument from collapsing under the tension of the strings are not actually fixed in ...


2

Primarily, but not solely. The fret spacing, and the progression of frets along the fretboard as you move toward the bridge, are based on the equal-tempered scale, and are primarily based on the total length of the string from nut to bridge. However, two other variables affect how close a fit that fret progression is to the "ideal". Those are tuning and ...


3

The spacing of the frets depends solely on the scale length of the guitar - which is easiest to understand if you think of it as being the distance between the nut and the saddle. The nut is the slotted piece that is located at the base of the headstock and establishes the string spacing at that end of the guitar neck. The saddle is located next to the ...


1

If you are talking about equal temperament 12 tone western tuning then yes. The length from bridge to nut sets the fret locations and hence the spacing.


3

It may - or may not work. The theory's right, but some capos press quite hard on the strings, so when taken back off, strings probably won't be accurate open. It happens the other way too - if a guitar is spot on open, putting on some capos will result in the guitar then being out of tune, maybe only slightly, but still out. Best bet is either to rely on a ...


2

Not for sure. Depending on how much you have to change the tension by turning the peg, and how tight the capo frets, the tuning can change when tension is redistributed by removing the capo. If you must tune with a capo, remove it and reattached it every time between adjusting or turning a tuning peg and checking the tuning accuracy. That will allow the ...


3

In theory it might work like you describe, but tuning through a capo feels like a terribly inefficient kludge. The capo will try to prevent the strings from moving under it easily, that's for sure. If the tuner app doesn't directly support other tunings, you could use a chromatic tuner and figure out what the correct notes are for your target tuning. For ...


6

In critical concert and studio situations the piano WILL be tuned before each performance, and sometimes even 'touched-up' during it. But the design and construction of a piano is such that they hold tuning pretty well, and in domestic situations tuning twice a year or even less frequently can be practically sufficient. Other instruments can hold tuning ...


55

Piano strings are attached to a cast iron frame, also known as harp. Cast iron is much less sensitive to humidity and temperature changes than wood. This is the main reason why they stay in tune relatively well. In contrast, harpsichords are somewhat similar but their frames are made of wood and they require much, much more tuning. Other factors are that ...


8

They do, and they are! But only really with concert grands prior to a concert. Not as far out as maybe a guitar or violin might be, but just a subtle tweaking. Guitar and violin, for starters, have exposed tuners which get knocked easily - in and out of its case, for example. Pianos are different. The mass of a piano also means its tuning is more stable, ...


12

Most pianos can hold their tuning quite well, but can do so only under ideal conditions. Because pianos weigh quite a bit they tend to not get moved around very much and are usually kept where temperature and humidity hold a fairly steady level over an extended period of time. Expose a piano to the same conditions that smaller more portable instruments are ...


0

A few things come to mind. Easy remedies on installing strings and concerns of breakage: First, agreeing with the above comment to 'grease' the nut groove near the scroll with a pencil (lubricating it). Also, make sure that the groove is wide enough (often not) and that it will not pinch the string just as one that is not properly lubricated. When using a ...


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