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In a symphony orchestra almost every every player is able to fine-tune the pitch of notes while playing. The absolute exceptions are the piano (if used), harp, open notes on stringed instruments, and tuned percussion. The oboeist gets to maintain a stable note (A) for everyone else to tune to. String players tune open notes. Wind players including brass ...


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Orchestral trombonists happily tune to A. We can refer it to the 1st position D, in much the same way that a violinist doesn't need to be given different notes for his other three strings! And we know where 2nd position A is on our slides. Also, our tuning slides aren't reset to zero when the instrument goes in the case. If it was in the right place for ...


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In Brass bands the instruments are tuned by a given Bb => playing C or G (Eb instruments). In the orchestra I actually don’t know: The oboist can give them a Bb or F to tune their zero position or they will be able to take the Bb by ear a semitone higher than the given A. They can tune with the trumpets giving them an concert Bb


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Depends on who you mean by "people". Professional piano tuners often use a strobe tuner to measure whether the A4 key on a piano produces a sound (within 1 cent or less) of 440 Hz in pitch. A stobe tuner doesn't display the frequency of the sound. Instead it shows how close the periodicity of the sound waveform matches a repeat rate of 440 per ...


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The base note of the temperament isn't necessarily important. What matters is the degree to which any given fifth is tempered. Instructions for the temperament might say to start with A, then tune D to a perfect fifth below A and then raise it by some specific amount. You would then proceed to G and C, each time with a specific instruction about how much ...


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As the other answer suggests, this is a huge topic, not really answerable in a few sentences. There's lots of information online. The Wiki article is a good place to start: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Musical_temperament


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This is more complex than it might seem. The paper, "A Practical Guide to Intonation and Tuning for unaccompanied ensembles and vocal groups" by Karel van Steenhoven discusses the matter in some detail. Each harmonic transition needs consideration (assuming that one is trying to keep intervals in some assigned temperament such as Just Tuning.) ...


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Partial answer. I'm not sure if we know how exactly it was done in the past. Various systems were used. One concept is that in non-equal temperaments various keys sounded differently, and sometimes some keys or chords were avoided because of worse sound. On the other hand I once saw a harpsichordist re-tuning the instrument on the stage; it took her just ...


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So there are two ideas going here and both are correct. The "drop" on Drop D, I believe, refers only to dropping the string down to D. However, the reason that works so well and is so widely used is because then the lowest three strings form a power chord DAD, which makes playing power chords easier in rock music because you can just lay one ...


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Some people understand "drop C" to mean CGCFAD (or, drop D transposed down a whole step). Other people understand "drop C" to mean CADGBE (or, standard tuning, and you drop your E to C). So I would not just call it "drop C". A somewhat common and less ambiguous name would be "E drop C" - since you are tuning to E and ...


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If drop D is D A D G B E, because the E is dropped to D, then logic says C A D G B E is drop C. Unfortunately, someone (trying to find who) decided that's not how to do it, so make of it what you will... EDIT: according to Wiki, it is in fact a variation of drop C tuning - just drop low E to C!


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If you remember from that Stringjoy Video of Electric Strings on Acoustic Guitar, Nickel Wound Strings tend to outlast 80/20 Bronze or Phosphor Bronze Strings. It never hurts to put Ernie Ball 12 String Slinky Electric Strings on an Acoustic 12 String to make it feel like an Electric 12 String to facilitate playability. Electric Guitar Strings also have more ...


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Just to note Electric 12 String Guitars are way easier to play than Acoustic 12 String Guitars because the Strings are lighter gauge, & the action is way easier. Also if you use really thin strings like 8s (or even thinner), they're actually less likely to break because the tension is lower.


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Figured it all out. Electric Guitar Nickel Wound strings have a much more full bodied & warmer tone than Bronze Strings, plus they tend to outlast Bronze String:


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If the fourth string were down an octave, a g'-c'-e'-e' ukulele would be tuned like the top four strings of a guitar with a capo on the fifth fret, meaning that chord fingerings that would work for that instrument would work on the ukulele. While it would be possible for larger ukulele to have a string tuned to the g below middle c, it would be impractical ...


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The correct answer is: It depends. If you want to play your piano in an orchestra that plays original-style baroque music (Bach, Händel, Purcel, ...) or even older music, you should tune it in 415 Hz, because this was the standard 300 years ago when this music was composed. Todays baroque orchestras still use this tuning, because some instruments that were ...


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