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Not being able to press all fingers down at the same time when making a chord is a common issue when learning a new chord. It seems to be something to do with how the brain learns - a sequence is easier to learn than all at once. The solution is to use a technique called air changes. When practising the chord: Move all fingers to just above the string ...


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Slow motion practice, with a metronome. Practice making the chords in very, very slow motion, such that you can make it the way you want (cleanly, each finger down at the same time). You will be going very, very slowly at first. For example, it might take you 10 seconds to make the chord cleanly, very slowly moving the fingers, paying attention that each ...


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Since standard ukulele tuning has the same intervals as guitar (strings 1-4, frets 5 and up), I write with the same guidelines in mind. If your intended audience is "beginners," stick to basic C-A-G-E-D shapes (open / cowboy chords). If you're writing for intermediate players then barre chords and a five-fret span seem fair. Always keep in mind not only does ...


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I think it's worth mentioning here that a major reason that guitarists and other stringed instruments use an alternate tuning is to accommodate a singer's voice. Though I believe you are referring specifically to instrumental music given your example, this fact also supports the case that D# tuning (usually called Eb tuning) is not that rare at all, at least ...


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