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13

Yes, the additional length required for each semitone drop is proportional to the original length. If adding valve 2 to an 'open' note is sufficient to drop a semitone, it will not be enough to drop a note that is already using valves 1 and 3. Or even just valve 1. This is addressed in several ways. Valves 1 & 2 theoretically add the same length of ...


8

The first valved horns, made by Heinrich Stölzel in 1814, had only 2 valves (arranged the same as modern 1st and 2nd). On one of these horns, if you play the notes of a C major scale from C4 to C5 (or from G3 to G4) (8 notes): four are open, two use the tone valve on its own, one uses the semitone valve on its own, and one uses both together. F major has ...


7

A trombone is the sum of its components. And the words of the economist, Thomas Sowell, "There are no solutions, only compromises..." applies to the trombone world as well. Part of why you might like the Bach are some of the things that you are trying to "fix." Similarly, part of the reason you liked the CL2000 valve may be because you also like the Conn ...


6

Here's a link to the Maurice Andre website which lists Maurice's opinions of the various piccolo trumpets he played over his career. The most common design for piccolo trumpets has four piston or rotary valves, with valve 4 introducing tubing with the combined length of 1+3. A less common design features three piston valves. Here's a picture of a beautiful ...


5

A good brass player can use any combination of valves. Mind - what I always tell them: the pitch is in your ear! You may certainly know that trumpets (not all of them) have a tuning slide: The pitch of the trumpet can be raised or lowered by the use of the tuning slide. Pulling the slide out lowers the pitch; pushing the slide in raises it. To overcome ...


4

Many trumpets have a mechanism (a spring-loaded lever or a simple ring) attached to the third valve slide. When using all three valves at the same time the mechanism makes it possible to manually lengthen the third valve slide. As you noted, the third slide isn't long enough on its own, so unless the this mechanism used, the pitch will be too sharp. Some ...


4

I've had similar problems with trumpets. It sounds like your valves / valve-casings are a bit misaligned. This can happen if the previous owner dropped any part of the trumpet / and or dust / dirt become stuck in the valve without them noticing and caused micro-abrasions. First, and I know this sounds silly, but make sure all the correct valves are paired ...


2

Take out and inspect the sticky valve pistons, looking in particular at the finishing around the edges of the airway holes through the piston. It might be that the edges of the ports are extremely sharp (sharp enough to cut your finger - be careful), or even have slivers of metal hanging off. More expensive instruments don't generally have this problem. If ...


2

I have only once taken apart a trumpet before so I don't really KNOW the answer to your question, but since no one else has helped I'll tell you how I would try to get out of your predicament. Are the valve cylinders different sizes? The largest spring can't fit into a smaller hole, so I would try to find where the largest spring goes first, and then work to ...


2

Yes. When cleaning the tuba (in the sense of a full cleaning of the instrument), you should also take out the springs in order to clean properly. This is for more easily cleaning both the springs and also the bottom interior of the housing.


1

Short answer, no. To oil it, first unscrew the top valve cap and remove piston. Next wipe off the old oil. Apply the new oil to the piston. Replace piston to valve casing and re-screw top valve cap. Screw the finger-piece clockwise until it stops. This aligns the piston correctly in the casing. Press and depress key quickly to work oil around. You don't ...


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