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10

There are three different mechanisms at work in vibrato on the different instruments: On fretless instruments, you modulate the length of free string, i.e. basically by the same mechanism you also use to play different notes. Easy enough done by rolling the finger a little back and forth along the string (longitudinally). This technique is quite objectively ...


7

Vocal style I think the confusion here is that there are many different kinds of vibrato, with playing techniques that differ from instrument to instrument and a style and nature that relates both to the instrument and the style of music you are playing. In general, the "classical voice" has a wide unconstrained vibrato, while the "jazz/pop" voice has a ...


7

Vibrato is pretty easy to define because there is one widely agreed-upon definition: a deliberate, regular, periodic change in pitch (like a controlled warble), generally much less than a semitone, sometimes as much as a quarter-tone or more up and down. Vibrato is commonly used as a performance technique by vocalists (including opera singers), players of ...


7

Any time you change the length or the tension in a string, you'll change the pitch. The "wrong" method in the video involves releasing the contact point, letting the finger "float." This is grossly wrong whether or not you're trying to get a vibrato, since you lose an incredible amount of sonority and risk having high harmonics show up. There's no reason ...


7

There are two main things you can do. First, you can finger the pitch an octave higher on the next string and do vibrato on that. The note you're fingering will vibrate sympathetically from the overtones, so this will actually have an effect. Second, you can do the motion of vibrato with your left hand, but with your finger somewhere that's not doing ...


5

Start by giving yourself the most advantage: Location on a string: Start with all your fingers fretting notes on the same string in the middle of the neck. The closer to the 12th fret you are, the more it is possible to move the note. String selection: Start with a string where you can get a good grip on the string (a wound string). I recommend the 4th ...


5

On nylon strung classical guitars, the commonly used vibrato is like that on a violin, from bridge to nut, within a single fret. It varies the pitch very slightly, and also the tone of the note. The wider vibrato used on steel strung and electric guitars doesn't work too well. That vib actually changes the pitch more, by stretching the strings, laterally to ...


5

Not knowing much about your instrument I have some ideas. The neck may be loose, or even damaged. Check it thoroughly. If it’s a bolt on tighten the screws. If it’s a set neck see a repair person. You may have very light gauge strings which are more susceptible to pitch shifting. Your whammy bar springs (if you have a whammy bar) may be too loose/badly ...


4

Long fingernails would present a problem to violinists, since they would interfere with the correct finger posture and prevent the finger-tip pressing the string to the finger-board, but these problems would show up even without vibrato. And your fingernails do not look too long. My advice would be to see a teacher and to just keep trying. Try slow ...


4

There is indeed! (at 1m46s) I don't believe they're widely manufactured though, not from what I could find


4

I think you're definitely magnifying the problem beyond it's perceptibility, vibrato is generally much too fast for the instantaneous difference to be heard at all. In fact, it's generally much easier to be in tune with vibrato than without. The natural fuzziness of a vibrated pitch generally makes it blend more pleasingly and there's nothing more difficult ...


4

Vibrato was and is known as two different techniques: Rou Xian and Yaxian. The below excerpt from Samuel Wong's erhu research explains the two techniques: 揉弦 Rou Xian (Vibrato) Vibratos can be effected by: i. Using finger pressure to suppress the string, increasing and decreasing its tension. This technique is also known as 压弦 yaxian and this is ...


4

Just to restate what was already said in previous comments: this technique should be called transversal vibrato. It is actually the standard technique on many fretted string instruments, in particular steelstring guitar. On fretless instruments, the preferred longitudinal vibrato is just the obvious way to go: it periodically alters the sounding length of ...


4

This is advice I give all musicians but it should come especially in handy for your particular problem. You must attempt to play with as little tension in your fingers as possible. Let gravity and mechanics do its job rather than your hand squeezing the string. I want you to pick up your violin and go into playing stance. Play an A on your G string like you ...


4

Think 'pivot' rather than 'shake'. Sort of. But get a violinist to show you. Words aren't a good way.


4

I'd be inclined to find a bit of plastic tubing - for aquarium use, or similar, that fits over the claws that hold the springs. Take springs off, add tubing, cut to length, replace springs. Ought to last a long time. Heat shrink would also do, but is much thinner.


4

In the era of extended techniques, nothing is truly impossible anymore. At the expense of a nice sound and precise pitch, you can change the pitch of the note you are playing by pressing a finger or a suitable object on the strings. Obviously, if you wiggle it around you get a sort of vibrato. There are quite some modern pieces that require altering the ...


4

Whether and how to use vibrato is a stylistic and personal question, and the most common answer for classical clarinet players seems to be just don't. Jazz players sometimes have doubled on sax and clarinet, and so brought their vibrato over from the sax. The most common technique for vibrato on the sax is to move the jaw up and down, using the same ...


4

Wrist vibrato without a shoulder rest can be accomplished by twisting the left elbow to the right, thereby flattening the thumb somewhat simply resting the violin neck on the horizontal thumb This not only releases the index finger from holding the violin in place (thus allowing for freely moving vibrato), but also allows for what I find to be a left ...


4

It's excellent that you're asking yourself this question! It's always disappointing (IMO) when a violinist just adds as much vibrato as they can to a piece without thinking whether it's really improving the performance. Vibrato adds another dimension of expression to the performance - you can use addition of vibrato to emphasise certain notes, and also vary ...


3

I can briefly explain what vocal vibrato means to me; it means that you are currently executing phonation with a perfect mouth shape and inner-space.. hence a natural vibrato is the result (it's not actually "forced"; but allowed to happen naturally). The first time I did it I was blown away.. because I didn't "do it". I practiced proper technique and one ...


3

Vibrato should usually be a natural phenomenon of a relaxed powerful voice but with the advent of amplification it has changed to more of a stylistic choice. Check out Nina Hagen's "Naturträne" and compare it with other songs from the same punk album (like "Unbeschreiblich weiblich"). It is obvious that her use of her operatically trained voice is both ...


3

As a professional voice instructor, I can assure you there's not much you need to worry about. Many times a natural vibrato (as long as it's variation in pitch, not air control - i.e. inconsistent breath support, and not laryngeal or "gospel jaw") is actually sign of proper singing technique. This includes things like proper diaphragmatic support, posture, ...


3

Vibrato is more or less a natural phenomenon once you are singing with nice support and a relaxed larynx. It's absurd that you would have to learn it at some given age: it more or less comes with a well-tended voice at whatever age. Vibrato can be produced somewhat artificially by conscious breath and throat actions but that is rarely convincing and often ...


3

Tremolo is essentially a variation in volume, vibrato in pitch. They are nicely separated with bowed strings where "vibrato" is done by a variation in the fingering hand, and tremolo is done by a rapid back-and-forth of the bow on the same spot. However, lots of instruments have things they call "tremolo" or "vibrato". There is also the non-instrument ...


3

I found an excerpt from a chapter written by Johan Sundberg in The Psychology of Music, a compilation of articles, presumably all related to psychoacoustics. Here are some quotes and explanations: Although F0 [the fundamental frequency of the note] varies regularly in such tones, the pitch we perceive is perfectly constant as long as the rate and extent ...


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