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Whether and how to use vibrato is a stylistic and personal question, and the most common answer for classical clarinet players seems to be just don't. Jazz players sometimes have doubled on sax and clarinet, and so brought their vibrato over from the sax. The most common technique for vibrato on the sax is to move the jaw up and down, using the same ...


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In the era of extended techniques, nothing is truly impossible anymore. At the expense of a nice sound and precise pitch, you can change the pitch of the note you are playing by pressing a finger or a suitable object on the strings. Obviously, if you wiggle it around you get a sort of vibrato. There are quite some modern pieces that require altering the ...


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I'm not a violinist, but I think you simply would not do this. If you want to apply vibrato to an open string, you grab that note on the next lower string and put vibrato on that note. There are some guitarists who press the string before the nut or slightly bend the neck to apply pitch changes to an open string, but I have never seen a violinist do that.


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Well, in the video it sounds like the singer is slowing down the vibrato by singing the two notes separately and "melding" them together through glissandos. For me, the easiest way to sing with a slow vibrato is to do the same. I would consider the two notes as separate, and alternate between them in a smooth fashion. For the strong and rich vibrato, you ...


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Wrist vibrato without a shoulder rest can be accomplished by twisting the left elbow to the right, thereby flattening the thumb somewhat simply resting the violin neck on the horizontal thumb This not only releases the index finger from holding the violin in place (thus allowing for freely moving vibrato), but also allows for what I find to be a left ...


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If wrist vibrato isn't working, then how about trying finger vibrato? In the long run, this might work better. It would probably be more subtle than wrist vibrato, but that's not necessarily a bad thing.


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As @JSheldon says, vibrato is varying pitch, tremolo is varying loudness. Why singers vary pitch more agilely than loudness is an accident of human musculature -- songbirds are quite different, for instance. The muscles that adjust the tension of the vocal cords (to adjust pitch) are tiny, and can change tension rapidly. The diaphragm and other apparatus ...


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In terms of the physics of sound, vibrato is usually defined as a variation of pitch, while tremolo is a variation of volume. Basically, a singer's vibrato happens naturally when they are singing healthily with good technique. A well-trained/well-skilled singer can modify the pitch and speed of their vibrato, or sing with straight tone (without vibrato) ...


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There are two main things you can do. First, you can finger the pitch an octave higher on the next string and do vibrato on that. The note you're fingering will vibrate sympathetically from the overtones, so this will actually have an effect. Second, you can do the motion of vibrato with your left hand, but with your finger somewhere that's not doing ...


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As a professional voice instructor, I can assure you there's not much you need to worry about. Many times a natural vibrato (as long as it's variation in pitch, not air control - i.e. inconsistent breath support, and not laryngeal or "gospel jaw") is actually sign of proper singing technique. This includes things like proper diaphragmatic support, posture, ...


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