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28

The length of the string is truly not changing, but there are other things that affect the frequency of the string vibrations. One is the density of the material (obviously this is not what vibrato changes), another is the cross-section of the string (ditto). The last one is the tension in the string. And that's what's being used here. Essentially, you ...


13

The movements are similar, the effects are similar, but the causes are different. Vibrato on a violin string is due to the length of the string changing. The player's finger rolls up and down the length of the string, which changes its pitch. On classical guitar (electric and acoustic players also use it) the action of rolling the finger, within the confines ...


6

On both fretted and non-fretted instruments, the vibrato works as a combination of change of resonating length, change of overall length, and change of tension. Many musicians simplify things when they describe how it works, and highlight only one or maybe two of these aspects. The reality is a bit more complex :) The fret-to-string contact is a low ...


6

Already good answers, but I think I can add some info. [I can think of at least two ways to do vibrato without the fingers: by subtly bending the neck and by using the erroneously named “tremolo” bar. But these are not relevant here.] You can do two kinds of finger vibrato on guitar: moving the string up and down (like a bend); moving the string side to side....


5

Here's the part of string that does change the length — it's within the fret that's pressed. It's not the part that resonates, but by making the string stretched, more tension is on all of the string length. That being said, it's quite a subtle vibrato and to get anywhere near an expressive vibrato with a technique like this, one would have to apply the ...


5

Two types of guitar strings: Nylon / other polymer / natural materials: The tuning tension is low (compared to metal) Bending the string doesnt achieve much of pitch change, because the string elasticity module is low as well. The tension simply doesn't change much. The string is thick, making it easier to pull it by friction towards the head or the saddle,...


5

Not knowing much about your instrument I have some ideas. The neck may be loose, or even damaged. Check it thoroughly. If it’s a bolt on tighten the screws. If it’s a set neck see a repair person. You may have very light gauge strings which are more susceptible to pitch shifting. Your whammy bar springs (if you have a whammy bar) may be too loose/badly ...


2

you only use vibrato on long lasting notes, correct? Only when you are learning. It's not like you are vibrating all time while playing It depends on the piece and the violinist. There are some pieces where good violinists will be vibrating almost all the time. it helps leaning my index finger on the neck of the violin Leaning is fine. Gripping is not. ...


2

For electronic instruments you get what is modeled. If it's available, it's available. If not, you can try with some pedals/effects in the signal way. For a real acoustic piano, there may be a very subtle effect by doing "vibrato" on the key strongly sideways. It's not exactly a vibrato (namely a periodic pitch change) but a change in the ...


2

I knew most of what I know about guitar before John got big, so I've never really dug into him, but everything I've seen tells me I should take a look. Chord vibrato is tough, and off the top of my head, I can't think of another song that features it. Beyond "search for videos of people trying to teach it" and "search for live versions of John ...


2

The other answers are great but I have to chip in because an obvious piece is missing in all of them. You can see guitarists vibrato in all styles of music. Here's the kicker: a guitar vibrato isn't usually completely horizontal -. It's usually a bit diagonal / or circular o in motion. The difference is a vertical bend in the string. Vertical bends of the ...


2

To answer the question of why this is done, the fretboard on a classical guitar is flat and it's easy for a nylon string to fly out from under your finger if you try to do bending vibrato like on an electric guitar.


1

As has been discussed on this site previously, there is no acoustic piano that will produce vibrato - an oscillation in pitch. By adding a mic, an effects unit and an amp/speaker, the sound of vibrato can be emulated, but for a bare acoustic piano - not yet.


1

If you are pressing on the fret itself (not between frets) rolling in the direction of the fingerboard definitely works. It's identical to what you would do on a fretless guitar (or violin, or other instrument for that matter). Rolling sideways works when you press in between frets because even though the fret is still pinching the string, the extra length ...


1

All of these answers seem correct. Sonny Edwards might be able to confirm, but for me, every classical guitar I've ever played the strings seem to roll or twist when you try to use vibrato, which feels horrible and makes me feel like I've lost some control. Maybe that also has something to do with it.


1

Based upon that audio, I can hear all the strings in the chord shifting, and by a lot. Sounds like it might a serious issue, like a crack opening and closing. That's a pretty expensive set neck guitar. Take it into a guitar shop for a look by someone else, preferably their in house tech.


1

There are things you can't tell by description alone, and the class "What's wrong with my instrument?" is solidly in that category. Stating that, there are a few hopefully helpful things I can say. Talk To Your Local Tech/Guitar Shop - That person has been dealing with instruments for a while and can tell if the instrument is in bad shape or if it'...


1

John looks like he's turning a key with his left hand/arm to apply that vibrato. It's not wrist motion, it's from the elbow. Using very light gauge strings will help. Probably having ridiculously large hands does too, but I wouldn't know.


1

You should not be teaching yourself vibrato! If you do it wrong once, your muscle memory for wrong vibrato will become fixed and it will be very difficult to unlearn and relearn it. I would strongly recommend getting lessons for this!


1

I had the same issue with a Wilkinson strat trem and thought it was a ground issue. I put a thin sheet of foam from the packing the came in a fender pickup box under the springs in the cavity and the noise was gone. I am not sure why the springs caused the scratchy noise...something mechanical? ... but the foam cured the problem.


1

"How does it help the singer? How does it help the listener?" First of all the ability to go into (natural) vibrato at any given point shows the singer that he has a very good vocal technique. Second, of course, vibrato is a means of musical, emotional expression that is enjoyable for both the singer and the listener, if used tastefully. "Is ...


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