33

With long open strings, the span to reach notes especially at the nut end would be too much for a lot of players if it retained the 5ths pattern of tuning. Making the tuning in fourths means that the left hand can encompass three notes in a scale and then move across to the next string in the same hand position. That said, it's not difficult to slide up a ...


10

I can think of two reasons: Bass is difficult enough the way it is. If you were to play it like a cello, you would need a) much more frequent position changes, and/or b) a strong, independent and wide-reaching (much wider than on cello with its shorter scale) pinky. I think most bassists never use the pinky on its own at all (or do they?), because a bass ...


7

It's a damper, or mute, like this one here When you wish to mute the sound of the instrument you slide it near to the bridge in order to dampen the bridge vibrations.


7

Do left handed violinists play in orchestras? Well... I do... (cello). I don't think I've ever seen any orchestra that uses left handed violinists It sure isn't a common sight. The vast majority of lefty players plays right-handed regardless. And that's not without reason, because My guess is that they would clash with the rest of the violinists, and ...


6

Yes, it is absolutely possible to restring a smaller size Viola into a Violin. You will not damage the instrument by doing so. Fractional size violins can roughly correspond with smaller size violas, although technically some will be slightly different in length. 4|4 Violin = 14 inch Viola 3|4 Violin = 13 inch Viola (Violin body often 13 ¼ inch) 1|2 ...


6

They are simply called "five-string violins" in the English language, and usually combine the viola and the violin's ranges. Other stringed instruments that have 5 strings are generally of the viol family, e.g. the pardessus de viole which could have 5 or 6 strings, or the quinton which specifically has 5 strings.


5

As a brass instrumentalist, I can only speak for that family of instruments. But the difference required to play in extreme registers is often explained with a simple sentence: Low notes require more air, high notes require faster air. And a simple experiment proves this: have a tuba player play, say, a middle C at a forte dynamic level and see how long ...


5

Yes and no. Yes, you can imitate the erhu style of playing on the violin: lots of glissandi, lots of vibrato on certain notes, very quick appoggiaturas, pentatonic melodies, and so forth. What you can't so easily imitate is the tone color: since the erhu has a snakeskin belly and silk strings (at least traditionally), it sounds different from a violin.


4

A few years ago I experienced a very strange (to me), and quite frightening disturbance in pitch perception -- one that came out of the blue. Fortunately it was temporary, lasting not much more than 24 hours. This may not apply directly to your situation, but is a possible answer to your question 3 (What other circumstances could affect the perception of the ...


4

Maybe you just never noticed them? I would suspect that someone trying to sell a violin with a head like a classical guitar wouldn't be able to sell them into a very, very traditional market. So... what did they do instead? They made geared tuners that look exactly like regular tuning pegs - with the added bonus that you can swap them into any existing ...


4

The rib height on a 14" Viola is bigger. Here is a short YouTube video on the matter:


3

Physics tells us that higher pitches have more energy. So if we apply the same amount of energy--bow pressure and speed for strings, air for winds--then low notes will naturally be louder. However, this is pure physics. It's not a huge effect, and the technique involved in playing the actual instrument completely overshadows it. It's most visible on piano, ...


3

I have two options that both work pretty well, the first being zip ties and the second being electrical wire. Zip ties are probably the easiest since they're cheap and easy to tighten, but the downside is they're impossible to move and impossible to remove without destroying them, so you would need plenty of extras. Luckily they're cheap. With electrical ...


3

I think it is simply related to your hearing (ie not pitch perception). In this case your ability to hear yourself. In this case you haven't mentioned whether your performance was solo or with a group. If it was solo I would say that you have suffered from a temporary hearing loss resulting in the inability to properly hear your violon and thus intonate. ...


3

I play the double bass and I know if it were tuned in fifths it would require a lot more shifting. No double bass player has the finger span to have the strings tuned in fifths. I say no double bass player because the instrument goes up in sizes to fit the player. It may be possible to tune in fifths if someone who normally played a full-size were to play an ...


3

The reason for tuning an instrument a certain way is always for playability reasons (and instrument construction/design/purpose). One could certainly make the argument that a particular instrument belongs to a certain family but it doesn't fully answer the question- the same question still applies- why does that family get tuned a certain way. "Just because" ...


2

It was common in the French Schools of the 19th century to tune in fifths. At that time the German and English bassists were switching to fourths. It was noted that the German and English bassists didn't need to work as hard as their French counterparts. The French were reluctant to leave fifths as they felt fifths tuned basses blended better with the cellos ...


2

We could probably find a picture of a left-handed orchestral violinist. But, mostly, it just isn't a thing. Beginner string players aren't offered the option. The left hand does all the clever stuff anyway. Just like on guitar. Bit silly to give THEM the option, really. Pianists have to do REALLY intricate things with both hands, and no-one whines for a ...


2

If you don't mind a little Do It Yourself, you can use Sausage Casing, which can be purchased by the pound. It takes some stretching and drying and possibly some twisting to make thicker strands. Waxed cord for leather sewing work also works pretty well for frets. You can find it for saddle making and other leather work projects.


2

@feetwet Right hand pizzicato is, as you wrote, indicated with "pizz.". There is no reason to make any other symbol for that; you can say that the word "pizz." has become the symbol. Any different symbol will just be confusing. Using an open circle to indicate left-hand pizzicato is a really bad idea since an open circle normally means a harmonic as you ...


2

Some reasons why people don't use geared tuners on violins: I haven't tested in personally, but there us usually some discussion on how using heavier material in metal geared tuners reduces some of the vibration transfer from the strings into the neck, causing some tone loss/difference. The wood to wood contact is supposedly better for tone. The short ...


1

As a former clarinet/sax player and current cellist, I have dealt with these issues most of my life. The other answers cover wind instruments pretty well. For string instruments, There are two basic ways to get louder: either press harder (so the string is extended farther before skipping loose from the bow hairs) or play faster (more grab/skip per ...


1

Been playing saxophone for 10+ years The lower notes natrually get louder, and the higher notes tend to get quieter. For lower notes we relax the jaw a bit. Higher notes I'll just be mindful of the tendency and play out a bit more.


1

As already answered, the force of violin string does not require gears. If you asked due to the possibility of finer tuning granularity, there are fine tuners instead, which are much cheaper, but also do not convince all violinists: so they either resort to standard peg tuning or have them only for one or two strings.


1

My personal experience as a lefty playing cello right handed and violin left handed has been that playing violin left handed has worked far better than playing cello right handed. I can not explain why, but since playing left handed on violin (custom built lefty violin), I am virtually unable to play the cello any more in the right handed manner. I will ...


1

It's not an absolutely terrible idea, functionally speaking (14" viola = approx. 4/4 violin), but do keep in mind that this is mostly preferable for fractional instrument sizing. Adult full size violas are much larger (most professionals play 16" or larger, a few play 15.5", and even fewer play 15"). Just be sure to use proper viola strings (you might need ...


1

I transitioned from violin to viola by playing a 3/4 size viola for a while. While the 3/4 viola (a Boosey and Hawkes, from memory) was nominally the same scale length as a 4/4 violin, the body was notably deeper.


1

I would not recommend it. Full size violins and violas have significantly different lengths, so you may end up in something with a similar length, but: viola strings are thicker and not as tensely stretched the instrument is optimized for different resonance frequencies. So you would have to restring the instrument, risk damage due to higher tension and it ...


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