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25

If someone is asking about the key of the instrument, I would answer "I play in concert pitch." If when jamming, someone asks "what key are you in?" I would say, "I am playing in (name a key) concert pitch." Then everyone else will transpose appropriately. In a group with many transposing and non-transposing instruments, a discussion might be needed to find ...


22

As Jomiddnz points out, there's pizzicato. You could also bow one string and pluck another at the same time. But if you want both notes played with the bow, and don't want the bow to catch the strings in between, the only way is by playing on the top and bottom strings with the bow under the strings. Here's an example (OK, the only example I've found): the ...


22

The upbeat is where the song starts. Imagine starting the song "Happy birthday to you" without the upbeat; then you would start singing "birthday to you". When you reach the end you don't play the upbeat of the song. Imagine ending "Happy birthday to you" by singing "Happy". So the upbeat is part of the song, starting the song, and should be played at that ...


19

The octave your violinist suggested is fine. Another possibility is the following: Why did Beethoven not write the above chord in his piano sonata? Because that major tenth is rather awkwardly wide for a pianist's hand. The chord he did write spans only an octave and so fits the pianist's hand. People writing for the piano prefer what is easier (and prefer ...


15

This actually happens more than you might think. If you Google it you might be surprised by how many results you can find. The reason is usually to do with the overall standard of the competitors. In these prestigious competitions they don't just give the first prize to the one judged to be the best: they also have to show sufficient talent to be ...


14

This is also called pickup note, pickup measure or anacrusis. You can read about it here: Wiki You can find them in a lot of songs, like Happy Birthday for example: Of course you don't have to use any pickup measures in your songs if they don't need one. However, if you use them, be sure to subtract the note duration of your pickup measure from the last ...


13

The 2 is a fingering notation; the 3 is over the middle and in a different font and size, so I can tell that the 3 is the indication to play a triplet (and the measure only adds up for a triplet). So that 3 doesn't necessarily mean to finger the first A with the 3rd finger, though you may wish to. The notation means: Play the F♯ with your 2nd finger Play ...


13

I think this way is called "holding the fiddle at the chest" or against the chest or "low down on the chest" (Chris Haig, The Fiddle Handbook). This hold is sometimes used for genres which usually refer to the violin as fiddle and playing it is called fiddling. E.g. in country or bluegrass. While this position has obvious disadvantages e.g. vibrato (...


12

Just to be pedantic, you could pretty easily bow the open G and A strings together by holding the D string depressed just above the bridge.


12

Don't be so literal minded. This is easy to play, and effective: If the quartet know the original piano version, they can easily simulate the arpeggio simply by violin 2 playing a bit ahead of the beat. Trying to get Violin 1 to play all four notes as written will probably be sound clumsy at this tempo, and it won't be as "ff" as something easier to play ...


11

If someone asks you what key you play in, I take it as meaning "name a key". You say what you want, and the others will follow. If you want to jam in F#, you'll tell them "let's play in F#". Each person should know how their transposing or non-transposing instrument behaves and what to do when told to play in F#. If F# is difficult for someone, they can say "...


10

Optimum bridge position is all tied up with the position of the sound post (which can be moved) and the bass bar (which can't). There's also the matter of getting used to playing a fiddle with non-standard dimensions, which may be counter-productive. A new bridge isn't expensive. Treat the violin to one, and a set of standard weight strings.


9

Just to add to the other answers, there's this unusual technique where you loosen the hair of the bow and play with the stick of the bow under the violin, but the hair wrapping over it. This allows you to play three or four strings simultaneously. To play only two non-adjacent strings, I guess you'd need to somehow mute the string(s) in between. I never ...


9

Disclaimer: I'm not a violinist. What follows is all head-knowledge, not practical experience. As you know, since a violin bridge is curved, no more than two strings can sound at a time, so any chord will of course need to be arpeggiated. This isn't that big a deal, and is part of the characteristic sound of violin stops. However, you also need to consider ...


8

Intonation in classical music is one of the things where there isn't a single, catch-all rule that you can just apply to get it “right”. Really, it's part of an interpretation. Perhaps the only thing we can say universally is that it should have a purpose. 12-edo is a good starting point. Although I often rant against the dominance of 12-edo, it can't be ...


8

The bridge has feet which need to be properly in contact with the violin body. If it tilts, then chances are that it's not completely so. It can be moved, slowly ('untilting') so that it's perpendicular to the body - upright - without slackening the strings, although you may be more comfortable sliding the bridge if they are loosened slightly. The other ...


6

A violin mute fits over the bridge and dampens vibrations making the violin sound quieter. As simple as that.


6

It will probably break. If it doesn't break right away the sound quality might not be the best. Furthermore you would be playing on a string that is much more tense than what you are probably used to.


6

Upbeats (as written in the OP) are played as if they were the last beat(s) of the pickup measure. In the posted piece, one can imagine (but not play) the 3-beat rest before the quarter note. The point is to begin a melody on an unaccented beat. There need not be anything at the end of the piece to make up for the upbeat. In some styles (older but not ...


6

It's actually an American one-dollar bill bill, folded and rolled up which he uses as a mute. Asked him post-concert after the recital the screenshot is from. He also revealed this in a post on his Instagram.


5

It looks like an exercise, since it is numbered "3" and it's just a G major scale. You practice it three different ways, with the three different bowings.


5

Absolutely, but it's harder on a modern instrument As RedLitYogi says, the convex bridge (not the fingerboard!) affects your ability to play more than two adjacent strings. A tight bow means you can only normally hit two notes at once. Historically this was not the case though. Baroque instruments had a shallower curve to the bridge, and they also used ...


5

They probably weren't secured very well at the tip (which is where I assume they were falling from) and when you pulled a couple out it freed a bunch of others. If half the hairs are gone it's time to find a Luthier or "Bow Guy" and get it re-haired. It's not a huge deal, bows need to be repaired just like Cars need to have their oil changed. The only ...


4

The 2 is a fingering indication. The 3 (which is in italics and a larger font) is indicating that the three notes are a triplet - so the first three notes take one beat. Hope that helps.


4

It makes more sense when words are involved. The upbeat is often a less emphasised word than the one following it - which needs to be emphasised. Happy birthday to you. My bonnie lies over the ocean. Oh, say can you see (by the dawn's early light). In order to get the emphasised word in the right place in the bar at the beginning (and anywhere else in the ...


4

It depends on the type of strings. For steel or synthetic core, the three lower strings are always ball end, and you can get three different types of ends for the E: ball end, loop end, or removable ball end (take the ball out and you get a loop end). But gut strings are available in either ball end or loop end for all strings - some manufacturers offer ...


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