New answers tagged

1

If you don't wipe the rosin off after each time you play, it will build up and eventually get a bit sticky so that the bow won't guide so smoothly. Dirty strings will also sound less open and fresh. From time to time, you should also loosen each string separately and rub it up and down with a clean cloth and something like meths. That should remove all ...


0

Itzhak Perlman is the classic example of a fat-fingered violin virtuoso. The way he describes what is required is that the new finger pushes the old finger out of the way. The problem with sliding the same finger up is that you get a slide. If the notes are supposed to be slurred you can't really lift the finger up and put it down again half a finger-width ...


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getting my finger round especially to the G and D strings is very difficult and feels unnatural. When you play a note on the G string the position of the fingers of your left hand over the G string should be the same in relation to the G string as they are over the E string in relation to the E string (and the same, of course, for D and A) when you play a ...


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The problem with starting to do wrist vibrato is that of co-ordinating right and left hand. To succeed they have to move independently in different directions. It is a bit like the problem of rubbing your stomach while patting your head (which I now see is much easier than it was before I learned to do vibrato!). The problem when you start is the usual one ...


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Yeah, when I bought my first violin it was "really scratchy". A year later the scratch had completely disappeared! That was because the scratch had nothing to do with the violin and everything to do with the player. As a beginner there is always a great temptation to blame the tools, the bow, the violin, the setup, the rosin, the shoulder rest (or lack of a ...


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l don't know how to nicely place and play my fingers on the neck Can anyone please suggest to me a recommended list of steps to follow in my learning? It is worth noting, in passing, that if you had a half hour lesson with a real, flesh and blood teacher (something which I know isn't allowed in these times of almost universal lockdown) then your ...


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The amount of stress applied onto the string will have a large influence on whether the sound produced is smooth or not, and the G string is especially tricky for beginners to control in my opinion. You can practice playing the G string at different tempo and strength, and find out the suitable stress for you. Also remember that you would need less stress at ...


0

The control of your arm, hands and fingers is very difficult concerning playing the violin. To avoid bad habits I would renounce to practice the violin and study meanwhile elementary music (melody, rhythm and especially sight reading, ear training and harmony. To practice these abilities you could buy a cheap second hand keyboard (max. 100 $). My advice ...


1

No. Strings tend to wear out as much by losing elasticity as by having their surface wear down. But in any case, you should not be applying more force when using the bowings you mention. Yes, there's more force when doing a double-stop, but it's spread over two strings. Make sure you aren't "grinding" when playing multiple stops. The various ...


1

There are 3 components to making a nice sound on the violin. Contact point Bow speed Bow pressure The contact point is whereabouts on the string the bow makes contact. It should be somewhere between the bridge (the light coloured thing that holds the strings up) and the fingerboard (the long dark thing that provides counter pressure when you hold a string ...


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"For the majority of players, the right hand is used for most tasks that require exacting manipulation: writing, throwing, etc." What defines "exacting manipulation"? This is ambiguous. "However, guitar, violin, lute, etc., use the right hand for plucking the strings – often with a pick – and the left hand is required to do the more exacting work of ...


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You can think of making music in two dimensions: sound production (pitch) and the nuance of the sounds (phrasing). The first is something of a blunt instrument - you either hit the desired pitch or you don't. The second is the fine detail that makes the sound musical... and that's something that requires more control. With some instruments, like piano or ...


2

I can see that there are already many answers to this question at this point, but I think I can add some more information on this matter. D Mac wrote: Why does conventional playing style give the string manipulation to the left hand? The left hand prepares the note, the right hand plays the note. Thus you are in control of playing with the right hand ...


1

The first fingering looks pretty good to me. The second one looks a bit awkward towards the end of the passage (between the G and A). You could also try this: using the second fingering, at the A, use 1,2,1,2 (going to the G with your 2nd finger). See what you think.


1

If you consider harp or piano, both hands are work to both select pitches and rhythmically "strike" notes. Both of those instruments are fixed pitch with one string per pitch. Moving to guitar and violin the first thing to point out is they aren't fixed pitch. You can stop the strings along the neck. That's a new job to do with one of the hands. Let's not ...


1

When you first learn to play a song then fretting can seem more complicated than the strumming but after you have learned to play the song without error then you focus on making the song sound good by making your playing expressive which is largely driven by the strumming hand (think of the difference between hearing a midi player play a song vs a real ...


1

This is easy: Beethoven named it so, see Wikipedia. A modern piano can always drown a violin and and I guess, it was the same situation with fortepiano at Beethovens time. (So I don't buy the emphasized instrument first proposal.) The sequence is unusual, however, since more often than not a piano is involved anyway (Advantages: supports harmonies, can ...


5

Your ear could be off. Even though the dim 5th is NOT an overtone of any vibrational frequency based on the standard accepted model of a string, there are a couple things that could cause this. The response of the other strings to an input is not an ideal response right at resonance. All naturally occurring system have damping and this broadens the ...


2

I suggest letting a luthier check out your instrument. The reason can be the string itself, it can be the position of the sound post just to mention two possibilities, there could probably be many other possible reasons, so you don't know what it is until you get a proper check of the violin.


1

I’m 41 and have been learning for just over a year. I’ve taken off my tapes but found that over time my finger placement starts to become less accurate. I can hear the difference but struggle to pinpoint where I need to place my fingers. I put a black tape at 1st and 3rd positions and that seems to do the trick for me. I’d rather spend the time learning a ...


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Vibrato is exceptionally difficult to learn correctly just from reading about it and watching videos. You can get started that way, but ultimately having a teacher or coach help with the physical aspect is usually necessary. One of the challenges with learning vibrato is developing the use of muscles and motions that aren't ordinarily used in the hand, and ...


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A4 = 440 is simply a convention. It was selected 1921 as a standard. Some follow it, some not. The orchestras around here, Stockholm Sweden europe seem to preferr 442 as of now. The frequencies of other tones are relative to each other. The octave above, A5 is double frequency. The octave below is half frequency. Intervals between the other tones depends ...


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The term you are looking for might be „bwv 1001 fugue analysis“ and will give you answers by google like: https://repository.asu.edu/attachments/110400/content/Felice_asu_0010E_12782.pdf A Pedagogical and Performance Edition of J. S. Bach’s Violin Sonata I in G minor, BWV 1001, Transcribed for Guitar: Transcription, Analysis, Performance Guide, Pedagogical ...


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Your title is "Bach fugues" then your post says "THE fugue." It's not clear if you want only analysis of BWV 1001... Siglind Bruhn, J. S. Bach’s Well-Tempered Clavier: In-depth Analysis and Interpretation https://www.amazon.com/Bachs-Well-Tempered-Clavier-Depth-Interpretation/dp/9625800174/ Online in a few places... http://edition-gorz.de/bruhn4-engl....


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In the Royal Conservatory study of Theory - Level 9 and 10 Harmony and the ARCT level of Harmony in their textbooks they go into the Analysis of many of Bach's Fugues.


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I would recommend instead inserting a solid spacer between the existing foam pad and the base of the shoulder rest. You really don't want a thick "squishy" pad as that will tend to change thickness as you move while playing (not to mention collapsing over time as the material ages). Another alternative is to use any kind of spacer and put a layer of the ...


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