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1

Here is an image from two different editions of the trio, I don't know which ones of those two is Mendelssohn's original one: How you play it can make a difference in how it sounds and feels. But since the cello is playing the same thing in unison with the violin an octave lower I suggest that you and the cello player make an agreement on how you will play ...


0

I'm not actually a violinist, but I have seen other scores with these notes marked as staccato (still slurred), which would make more sense with those bowing directions (you could stop short on the first note, continue the down bow on the second and finish on the up bow). Interestingly I have also seen professionals bow this in alternating directions (down, ...


1

If it's a law you want, let's try a law of physics: how a lever works. Compared to playing at the tip, at the frog you don't have to push nearly as hard to exert the same downforce on the string, because the lever arm is shorter. This isn't "gravity." It works if you're hanging upside down, or in a helicopter flying a complicated trajectory, or in even ...


2

Wrist vibrato without a shoulder rest can be accomplished by twisting the left elbow to the right, thereby flattening the thumb somewhat simply resting the violin neck on the horizontal thumb This not only releases the index finger from holding the violin in place (thus allowing for freely moving vibrato), but also allows for what I find to be a left ...


1

If wrist vibrato isn't working, then how about trying finger vibrato? In the long run, this might work better. It would probably be more subtle than wrist vibrato, but that's not necessarily a bad thing.


1

You somehow missed the Paganini Étude No. 4 by Liszt, which is a one-staff transcription of the Paganini Caprice No. 1. Enough additional notes are placed so some sections have to be played with both hands.


2

I have the opposite experience. I find it easier to play right after I wake up, shower, and have a little coffee. I'm on the guitar by about 6:30am. In contrast, I find it very difficult to focus and practice in the evening. There are different kinds of people in the world, some night owls and some early birds. For me, morning is my most productive ...


1

As long as the strings to be played are next to each other, there's no reason for notes to not change smoothly during a double stop. In your example, you would have the 3rd finger on the A string and your 1st and 2nd fingers on the E, and would lift the 2nd finger to change to F. Here's an example of double stops changing in Bach: Bach Sonata No. 1 for ...


8

The bridge has feet which need to be properly in contact with the violin body. If it tilts, then chances are that it's not completely so. It can be moved, slowly ('untilting') so that it's perpendicular to the body - upright - without slackening the strings, although you may be more comfortable sliding the bridge if they are loosened slightly. The other ...


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