New answers tagged

0

Your concern seems to really be about sensing correct pitch. That isn't a specific violin problem, but it happens to be the case you are learning to play violin. ...before electronics, say, in the 1800s? ...not in the presence of their instructor ...check your intonation I think it's very good to look into historical sources, but you may be conflating ...


3

First, I view the ties above the notes (last beat and a half of the measures) as a phrasing indicator, to ensure you lead the final triplet into the last beat smoothly. Next, I suspect the composer wants you to maintain the initial note (the down-stem quarter notes) thru the beat as a "drone" under the triplets. So, double-stops. Finally, the tie ...


2

Slurs are ambiguous: they may mean ties between note heads (notational convention), bow direction (technical instruction), or phrasing (musical expression). There's no particular reason why all three couldn't be in effect at some point.


2

The first arrow is tying into the eighth note. The quarter notes at the beginning of the phrases indicate a three count, at D, D, DE in the first bar, so the sixteenth notes would be a sextuplet run, tying the last note of the second sextuplet into the eighth note. I suspect that the last two eighth notes would be played Portato, separating the notes with ...


0

I doubt anyone played the violin without an instructor. At that times, music was more of a job than a luxury. Some, such as the nobility class could do so, but they had the ability to hire a good tutor. The middle class could hardly afford it, a reason why the clavichord, a cheaper version of the keyboard instruments was invented. Plus, they didn't play ...


0

First bring it to your lesson so your teacher can evaluate it. "Scratchy" is not diagnosable over the internet :-( . It's quite possible your strings are dead, or cheap/lousy strings to begin with. As a warning to others, I strongly suggest never buying an instrument without having your teacher or other local accomplished player evaluate it for you. ...


0

That's a very difficult question to answer, because there are many reasons a violin may sound scratchy. The best thing would be if you could show it to someone who knows violins- a teacher, a good violinist, a luthier.


4

When playing three or four string stops, don't try to play all the strings at once. For a triple stop, you start double on the lower two notes and rotate to the upper two notes during the bow stroke, roughly splitting the duration of the note in half for each double. On a four note stop you play the bottom two strings, then transition to the top two. ...


0

Indeed,as many users have said before me, the arrows were used to indicate a low fingering than usual, which was surprising to me, as the piece was not a beginner string piece. So, the answer came as a shock, as none of my pieces that were of lower level than this piece has the arrows. Thank you to all those who had spent their time to answer these ...


2

Violin muted make it easier to play music quite without annoying people nearby. Alongside being used to quite the sounds of the violin, violin mute are also often used in pieces of music. Some music pieces specifically suggests to use a violin mute. For example, this piece, Arlington Sketches, it specifically tells us to use a mute in certain parts. Here, ...


3

Good answers here, I would add that some violins have have little knobs called "fine tuners" which make small adjustments to the tuning much easier. You may be able to add these to an existing instrument at a violin shop, I'm not sure of the specifics. Other than that waiting for the strings to get broken in can help, and if you are experiencing intense ...


2

I think it may be due to the weather and violin strings go out of time very easily due to this. Make sure to store the violin somewhere with moderate temperature and with less humidity. Violins are prone to getting out of tune if there is too much of an imbalance in the temperature. Practise somewhere with moderate temperature and try not to switch around ...


6

leftaroundabout touched on this briefly but no one else has, so I thought I'd point it out specifically. The tuning knobs may be loose. My daughter's first guitar experienced this. I would tune it up and it would immediately slip. Coming from a guitar world, I'm used to ratcheted tuners, but the violin appears to just rely on friction alone to keep the knob ...


4

One thing you can do is not tune adjacent strings consecutively. Tune the outer strings, then inner, or skip a string. My experience is with guitar, where there are more strings and a wider fingerboard, but tuning this way helps to even out the tension across the neck and make tuning more stable.


0

The down- or up-arrow is often pencilled in by performers to indicate intonation (as in, "this note should be played lower [higher] in pitch than feels natural"). I've never seen it actually used in printed music, but that would be consistent with the context of those four notes in the example.


6

My husband suspects (...) that it is because it is new and the strings are so new. Is that possible? Not only possible, but almost always generates a great deal of disappointment with new strings on a variety of string instruments. The instrument itself being new is less important. Don't worry, the strings will settle in a few days. Or week. Just keep ...


-1

I suggest it's telling you which string to use. In the passage that starts D up to A, you'd play those on the open D and A strings. For the following descending G F E you could then switch back to the D string - but you'd quickly need to change down to the G string to play the C. So in the first passage the down arrow means that instead of the D string, ...


6

Yes, your instrument will require more tuning from its original set up. As it settles in it will require less tuning to get it in tune, but all string instruments require regular tuning. Initially the strings haven't been stretched yet, so under tension they will "relax" some as they stretch out. Even steel strings will do this, although less than nylon ...


20

Alas, string instruments notoriously lose tuning for seemingly trivial reasons, especially classical guitars and wooden bowed strings. Temperature, humidity, looking at it... so, better get used to tuning. Good news is, like with the actual playing, practising tuning helps getting it done a lot quicker! Experienced players can completely re-string and tune ...


7

The strings should have been tuned up to pitch before it was packed up for sale, otherwise there is a risk that something would shift out of alignment. You may not realize that the bridge, the tail piece, and the internal "sound post" that stops the top and bottom of the instrument from collapsing under the tension of the strings are not actually fixed in ...


0

Surprisingly enough, if you look at the history of the tune "Twinkle Twinkle Little Star", you will find that it is indeed "Classical Music". Beginning method books use short and sometimes recognizable tunes to aid in the development of playing technique and ear training. Ultimately, the techniques you develop may be used for more complicated music, ...


2

Beginners of violin playing are used to learn first little melodies in major on the E, A and D string: the motifs like DoReMiDo will be (analog to Guitar frets) 0,2,4,0. The arrows above F, Bb and Eb are assigning that the finger position is now lower compared by F#, B and E. So I agree with Lars Peter Schultz, additionally trying to show the pedagogical ...


4

The arrows could refer to the finger positions. The first E-flat is low 1st finger. The second one low 4th. If the F you mention is on the E-string it is low 1st, if it is on the D-string it is low 2nd. And so forth. It is common in violin sheet music to indicate low finger positions with down arrows, especially in music with pedagogical intention. EDIT: ...


-1

It is probably a reminder of the notation rule that a flat at the same pitch lasts for the whole measure, but any other octaves of the same note have the pitch indicated with their own accidentals.


2

It is helpful to some, but sometimes can create dependency. I have been playing the violin for a year and a half, and I sometimes take off a few tapes, just a few weeks after mastering a piece, just to see how it goes, and I can do pretty well without them. I have been using them less and using my ears for intonation. Though, they are important at the ...


2

I’m learning Indian classical violin and I relate to the issues you have mentioned . One of the things that helped me is to keep practising the basic lessons everyday, no matter what lesson I am in currently. I also set goals for myself for each 15 day period and record myself to see the differences. Also, if I know I get stuck on a particular deflection, I ...


8

My guess is that these aren’t negatives, but just dashes used to show that a shift is necessary to use the suggested fingering. For instance, maybe you are playing an F# on the E string and then need to play a C a tritone higher. I might give the fingering for the C as –2 to indicate that you should use the second finger, but that this will require a ...


1

It's not strictly necessary to use an electronic tuner to tune a violin! In fact, getting all strings in tune with each other is quite enough, even in the early stages - provided the strings aren't too loose or tight! And that can be a good way to start listening to the notes it produces - the P5 sound. Playing violin needs concentration on the sound ...


1

How did beginning students practice hitting the right notes? One doesn't need an electronic tuner or recording to check their intonation. When the violin, a tuning fork or a wind instrument, or even a piano, could be used, though the piano would go out of tune with time, though relatively slowly. When one is playing, one can listen to the interference / ...


3

I took a look at the case you are considering shipping it in which does not look substantial enough by itself to adequately protect your instrument. However, you might consider building or having built a simple wooden shipping crate that would be large enough to contain the instrument and its case together to protect your precious cargo. Pack with bubble ...


5

As Tetsujin said, rough handling is always a possibility, and I would worry about that more than about the temperature and pressure difference. So my preferred solution would be really to have it as a carry-on. I once flew with an ukulele without a problem. This was a low-cost airline of the kind which sells seats within Europe for 19 Euros, and makes its ...


9

It's always going to be a gamble. I've had a case marked fragile arrive squashed, with obvious tractor tyre marks over it. For many years after that all my cases were marked "Fragile - please throw under-arm" I'd say if the violin is worth more than a seat, buy it a seat, otherwise pack it well, check your insurance, & hope. There's always the ...


7

You are missing the difference in society between 1800 and today. In 1800, people learning the violin would usually either be the children of professional or amateur musicians, or members of the upper class who employed private tutors for every aspect of their childrens' education, including music. So the student would be learning in an environment where ...


3

I don't see electronics as much help for practice in general. The pitch reference was most likely a piano or a decent flute/recorder: the ability to compare pitches even for different tone colors had so to be trained earlier, which is a definitive advantage. Not only for hitting the correct pitch (which is far from being the only useful ability improved by ...


15

Your question assumes that the current standard is to use electronics as an aid. They can be helpful but a musician must be able to hear the correct tones. This takes time and practice to get right and there are exercises and techniques for achieving very good relative pitch. Relying on electronics to do this is actually detrimental to a musician's ...


2

Same way they mostly do now. There's not much use of electronic aids.


0

The assumption that printed fingerings are of the composer, can be misleading. Unless you are playing etudes, I would consider printed fingerings as mere helping suggestions. Good fingerings are of subjective nature and you should use fingerings suiting your style and skills unless you are trying to learn from etudes. The only cases when fingerings could ...


4

I think the taste metaphor does capture it quite well: while piano and dolce are both “soft” in a sense, they are so in very different ways. p is a shy, fragile kind of soft, in the way a balm mint leaf is soft. But dolce is a thick, embracing kind of soft, more like the way a custard pie is soft. As well as how it's sweet. So, how do you play it? It's hard ...


3

piano is simply p: more quietly than mp, but not as quietly as pp. Dolce means, as you say, 'sweetly', and I think it often suggests a degree of simplicity in the playing. The composer might have written espress. but has chosen NOT to. I think such passages should be played with little rubato and with little vibrato. Music marked dolce is tender, often ...


1

Violin playing uses frequent shifts of hand position. The most common positions used are 1, 3, and 5. The even numbers are not used so much in normal playing, though your example uses the 2nd position several times. (Is it an exercise in shifting positions, I wonder?) The fingerings on your example show the notes where there is a shift to a new position. ...


0

I'll go point to point here based on your thought process (still learning violin, but I've been playing for 13 years so far) You are correct, this A3 can only be played on the G-string You actually go to 3rd position with the second finger. Meaning that your first finger hits the G4 on the D-string. You need not shift back down over here, because you can ...


0

A few things come to mind. Easy remedies on installing strings and concerns of breakage: First, agreeing with the above comment to 'grease' the nut groove near the scroll with a pencil (lubricating it). Also, make sure that the groove is wide enough (often not) and that it will not pinch the string just as one that is not properly lubricated. When using a ...


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