7

It is common to play double-stops, certainly in solo pieces; and indeed also quite common to play 3- or 4-voice chords (these need to be "broken", i.e. you quickly excite the low strings and let them ring, then pull the bow up and sustain the high strings). Indeed the multi-stringedness might have something to do with what you call "synthetic" sound you're ...


7

Yes it is quite common. The technical term for this is double stop. Note, that independent of form of the bow the hairs are just fixed at the tip and the frog. So the hairs have really no choice but to form a straight line (but are deformed by contact with the strings). Even since the string arrangement is curved, it is easy to find an angle, where the bow ...


5

Basic background A cello has four strings, tuned in fifths: C, G, D, A (just below middle C). Double Stops It is possible to simultaneously play any two strings that are next to each other. The bowing is generally not difficult. To be realistic, though, you also have to consider the fingering. Some limitations to consider are: The left hand can only ...


4

I don't play cello, but I'll answer this based on what I do on double bass. Simple answer: You can play two strings together. It is common to play several strings together. how many strings are typically played during a piece? All of them. I think you wanted to ask how many strings are typically played simultaneously during a piece? Αnd the answer ...


4

This isn't a great answer if you just want your kids to make music, but if you want to use music making as a vehicle to teach the kids how to program then I'd take a look at Sonic Pi. The founder of that effort is Sam Aaron the guy behind Overtone, a Clojure dialect that overlays SuperCollider and turns it into an elegant live coding environment. The people ...


4

The keyboard layout used on that VP is appalling. Compared to http://www.onlinepianist.com/virtual_piano/ or http://www.multiplayerpiano.com or http://method-behind-the-music.com/piano, for example. The layout there is far more logical. It's the type of layout used by a lot of music authoring software too (good authoring software would have configurable ...


3

It's a stylistic thing, because many players favour having a really strong solid low D note for emphasising rhythm, and making their ornamentation really 'pop' with that strong low note. In a classic 'chicken and egg' situation some instrument builders are biasing their chanters to make the hard low D easier to play, which will then increase the prevalance ...


3

There are a few things you should do: Ensure the track is armed for recording In most DAWs, a track will not "play" unless armed, this is to help avoid MIDI inputs triggering every track all the time by default Enable the Virtual MIDI keyboard Per this post on the forums, one user posted that this is in the "view" menu of Reaper Set the track to receive it ...


3

Listening to your piece, there's a number of fundamental issues that immediately jump out and should be given attention before you focus on transitioning/modulating from one key/phrase/section to the next. Although this is all quite subjective, there are certain conventional guidelines you can follow to get your music sounding better, or as you put it, more ...


3

If you're sure you want to use virtual piano there are some example songs that you can pull up within the software. If you already know the tune you don't have to worry about rhythm and it will help your muscle memory to remember certain patterns of notes. A better idea is probably to purchase a really cheap piano keyboard. A quick amazon search for me ...


2

Samuel, There are many great answers above, here's a bit more. I play the cello, and as mentioned above, you can play 2 strings at a time. This is known as a double stop. It is quite common and I think it sounds great. If you're utilizing sampled cello sounds, you'll definitely meet a challenge in trying to make it sound convincing or realistic. However if ...


2

I suggest to buy a digital piano and use it for composition. When drawing notes on a computer screen, you do not actually hear immediately the music you compose and can try less variants than just attempting to play directly. From that I tried, as little as telling "press every second white key, together or in a sequence" (so C, Dm, Em, etc) results ...


2

There is one part of your question that I am qualified to answer, and that is the part about requiring different drivers for each keyboard. This would not be the case unless the keyboard in question was being plugged directly in to your Mac via USB. If you add a MIDI interface to your setup, then you only need drivers for this interface, and you will take ...


2

Making virtual instruments real and believable is a matter of having faithful sound banks but... while this is enough for "keys" (pianos, organs, synths, etc.), it's only a starting point for guitars if you are playing them through a keyboard. Due to that, being that I carry out some arrangements and transcription of pop and jazz music for the band I am part ...


2

The bottom D is different from every other note, because the hole at the end of the pipe must be open (and it is the only open hole). That means that the bottom D has a different tone colour from the rest of the notes, as well as being louder. For all the other notes, the end hole is covered by pressing the pipe against the player's leg, so that covering ...


2

Samples can be dangerous. First and foremost you need to remember that you’re writing for real people, and that should always be your end goal. If you have limited experience, samples can distort your perception of balance, texture, and response throughout register. There are also many things that can’t be played back, for example, if I specify a passage on ...


2

I don't know what the virtual drummer does, but the new Band-in-a-Box 2019 has a DAW plugin (VST/AAX) that might do what you want. Update 11/2019: there now seems to be a VST/AU/AAX plugin version for the Mac as well, though apparently only 64 bit https://www.pgmusic.com/bbmac.htm Here it is demonstrated in Reaper: Some ...


1

For sound sources you can find information here. In my opinion, u-he plugins are especially great. As for visual feedback - you can change your pianoroll layout to different tunnings in Reaper.


1

I have both libraries and have used both. The same principles apply with two big exceptions: first, the lack of strings in the band, and second, the difference in percussion instruments. There are minor differences: the band has things like alto clarinets and the whole family of saxes but usually lacks bassoons or oboes. Allocation of lines to instruments ...


1

There are various pieces of software that let you do this. Your best bet is to look at specific VSTs for your favourite DAW, but you can also find this functionality in various applications badged as amp/effect simulators.


1

This behaviour (track renaming) apparently started in the Cubase 7.5 update. It was noted in the linked thread as being undesirable, however it seems that the issue was not resolved despite developers being notified. Perhaps it has been addressed in the latest version of Cubase (you don't say what edition you are using), but perhaps not!


1

A more recent alternative to virtual piano with a different key mapping can be found here: Recursive Arts Virtual Piano. Further details about key mappings are also available.


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