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There's quite an interesting change that happens in your voice when you're healthy. In men, it causes the voice to deepen and become more sonorous, and men with deep voices are perceived to be more attractive and healthy to the opposite sex. Your better vocals post workout are likely down to an increased lung capacity, and better blood flow. I'm tempted ...


8

Are you a singer who is primarily looking to increase your vocal performance or are you actually interested in learning the instrument for the instrument itself? I would say these two things are different. Because if you are really only interested in singing, then there are plenty of vocal exercises you can do to increase all of the things you want and much ...


8

Singing pitch is mainly controlled by the tension on the vocal folds. Higher pitch, higher tension. You failed to mention your age: the vocal folds (basically peripheral parts of muscles) and other movable parts of the larynx are fixed to cartilage. This cartilage construct gets a growth spurt (like a calving glacier) when your voice changes in puberty ...


5

There are rather few synergies between the mechanisms of playing most instruments and singing, to the degree that it makes no sense to pick up a particular instrument except for the sake of playing the instrument on its own. Lung capacity does not really change all that much and it is rarely a limiting factor in singing: it's much more important to focus on ...


5

If you are singing in falsetto, you will notice that you won't need to exhale as forcefully to sing high notes. You should also sense a relaxation in the muscles that control your vocal chords. You will also be able to sing high notes much more quietly when singing in falsetto. There is a distinct and recognizable physiological shift in the mechanics of the ...


5

According to a post at the New York University Medical School answer center, smoking and exposure to smoke irritate and dry the tissues of the throat, particularly the vocal cords. This leads to improper vocal cord vibration and function. Smoking also may promote acid reflux, which can affect the vocal cords. Finally, smoking degrades lung function, which ...


5

Here are a few thoughts: If you don't already, you definitely need to develop a vocal warm-up / cool-down routine. You wouldn't run for four hours without stretching, would you? Why then would you sing? I don't have time / space here to suggest specific exercises, but I'll say you should definitely start researching. A good exercise works from the back of ...


5

Emily, great question and welcome to the stack. In order to answer your question, there are some truths that you'll need to understand / accept: 1.) 14 is quite, quite young. Like it or not, your voice will very likely not reach full maturity until your early-mid 30's. There is tremendous pressure / expectations from the internet, tv, and music for young ...


5

You mentioned the term strain. Strain is a big problem in the voice; if you feel strain, you should stop immediately. Pain is a message from your body telling you to stop. You also mentioned that you don't know precise terminology, however. You said strain, but is it possible that the note is simply high and it is difficult for you to sing it? Depending on ...


4

I'm going to guess that the major factor is breathing. High notes in particular really need good breath support, and your workout is prepping you to take full breaths and have good posture for breathing. It also sounds like you're coming away from your exercise with an "energized" feeling. Singing is a physical process, but it involves a coordination of ...


3

Firstly, I don't know why you are experiencing "inflammation" but all I can say is stop! Anything that is causing you pain is usually bad. It sounds like you're really anxious to start singing again and are pushing too hard. If you keep pushing hard you risk damaging your voice. Realize that when you're out of practice your range shrinks and your technique ...


3

Philosophically, I believe my best possible tone is the most open and honest sound of my personal voice that I can achieve. Instead of shaping my sound, I view it as finding my sound. I try to find it by: Relaxing Warming up (this is so key to singing and more important every year you get older) Staying in my comfortable range - at least while working on ...


3

Head voice is a transitional voice using both chest voice and falsetto mechanisms. It's usually employed in the character of a lightened chest voice so it still has the "male tinge" to it. It's probably the main upper register tool for the lyric tenor in contrast to the dramatic tenor which uses a stronger bout of chest voice. "Reinforced falsetto" is a ...


3

These are some instruments that can help you increase your lung capacity: treadmill stationary bike stairmaster … if you play them 4–6 sessions per week at medium to high intensity. They will also help with projection by improving your endurance, relaxation, posture, and diaphragmatic power and control.


3

Here are some excerpts and links I hope you find useful. If you follow the links to each website you will find more information and details there. Jessica Hendricks from http://www.livestrong.com/article/278098-list-of-good-bad-foods-for-your-voice/ writes that dairy products (yogurt, cheese, butter etc.) should be avoided because they "....increase phlegm ...


3

It's also a matter of timing. As a male alto with a natural bass-baritone voice, good closure is essential for good reach, sound, and dynamic control. Things that repeatedly surprised me to have surprisingly good consequences here have been eating/drinking/talking/partying too much. Also, a considerable bout of endurance sports (like running/dancing/...


3

One thing I haven't seen anyone disagreeing about is that water is good for the voice. I've heard that fatty foods like chips should be good (I think the reason was lubrication of the vocal chords), but I haven't seen any good results from that. Drinking water is good in my experience though.


3

Humming at low volume shouldn't hurt the vocal folds, in fact it's a good vocal warming up exercise. But when you say for a long time, how long are you talking about? Humming still puts the larynx and vocal folds to work, if you do it for a really long time they may become strained. Also you may have a tendendy to hum at lower pitches than your natural ...


3

This is a very confused question. Your description of falsetto is mostly wrong, partly by mixing up cause, effect, and side effects. Falsetto comes about by a particular configuration of the larynx that does make it harder to achieve good closure in lower ranges. The fundamental pitch control mechanisms in falsetto and chest-based voices are considerably ...


3

There are multiple ways to do this, and I realize that this is a pretty difficult situation to be in, especially if you're not familiar with this sort of thing. One solution is to sing while playing the accompaniment. I'm not sure if you've already ruled this out, though. If the accompaniment is simple enough, you can find the main chords of the song, ...


3

You think you sing okay when you tried it so you continued. This is good, it means you have confidence in your voice. But singing is a delicate art form that takes a lot of training to do correctly. I study with a classical vocal coach and I'm always surprised at just how little I understand about the inside of my body after lessons. PAIN = INJURY, ...


3

I've got an idea: GO TO A DOCTOR The most pressing issue here is the pain. Pain here is likely indicative of some form of injury, and definitely beyond the capacity of SE to respond to specifically. You should probably refrain from singing until you get that looked at by professionals. In terms of singing, if your family won't let you get lessons, then ...


3

The phonetic term for this effect is “creaky voice,” but it’s perhaps more often referred to as “vocal fry” in musical contexts. It’s not especially difficult to produce, though it is difficult to describe how to do. It’s the sound that happens when you try to sing notes far below your standard vocal range. Many radio djs on NPR use creaky voice, and it’s ...


2

The answer to your last question is probably yes. But I'm guessing that this is not exactly what you want to know. It's also about timbre not just volume. If you keep a consistent medium or low volume you might still be able to bridge smoothly but your voice will probably start thining out as your get to the 4th octave. That might or might not be what you ...


2

Besides sleep and hydration, which are key, you should warm up and cool down. Also, like any endurance activity, you have to train up to it at a measured pace and there will always be a limit to how long you can go. If you are hoarse all the next day you are probably hurting your voice, and that damage can be permanent or semi-permanent. If you get nodules ...


2

Rockin Cowboy- I could've written your initial question. In fact I have over about 40 years of doing the lead singer thing (mid 50s now, still doing it). I've asked so many teachers this same question.... Pay attention to the answers above that tell you that 'as you get older, it will get harder to recover'. This has been my experience as well. I'm in a ...


2

3 to 4 hours is too long to sustain on a regular basis. I work around 180 shows each year and duration of show is 90 min. Vocal tiredness is inevitable as the varied environment of each gig offers its own individual problems for the voice. Over straining the voice is difficult to avoid when working outdoors to a large crowd for example unless you have ...


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