33

You could be not reaching those high notes for any of these reasons: You are young and your voice is still developing your vocal technique is bad you're doing the wrong exercises and over-straining your voice you have a naturally low voice, and you'll never hit those notes Only a qualified voice teacher will be able to tell you which of these is the case, ...


13

Average untrained baritone male range is F2-D4 Average untrained tenor A2-Ab4 and will have naturally resonant falsetto/head voice up to Eb5 that can slide in and out of call register. Average Trained Baritone range is F2-G4(A4 Extreme). Average Trained tenor range is A2-C5(Eb5 Extreme). falsetto range can vary between the two, in fact some baritones can ...


10

First off, we need to distinguish between range and tessitura. Your range is the complete set of notes that you can sing, including head tone and falsetto. Your tessitura is the range in which it is most comfortable for you to sing. Both of these change over time, and particularly for male voices, those changes can persist well into a singer's thirties. As a ...


10

To be realistic, different people have different ranges. If everyone had the range of Mariah Carey or Axel Rose they would use it. However Taylor Swift only has just over 2 octaves and she has managed quite well. As others have said; don't strain but remember that falsetto or even whistle registers might be available to you. This is a way of getting extra ...


9

What you want to do is 1. Figure out the required range of the melody (such as for example a sixth, an octave, or an octave and a fifth). That means finding the lowest note and the highest note used for the melody (and determine the interval between those). 2. Fit the middle of that melody range1 best possible to the middle of the average musically useful2 ...


9

According to this Reddit post, the numbers are roughly as follows: Men: 20% Bass / 45% Baritone / 35% Tenor Women: 15% Contralto / 35% Mezzo / 50% Soprano For males, the ordering implied by these numbers agree with this statement in Merriam-Webster, which is listed under the entry for "baritone": baritone In vocal music, the voice or register ...


9

Either F or G are the keys I've played it in, with many different bands. That takes the high note - the one that's hardest for some to reach - a D, when in key G. However, since the lowest note is ony an octave below that, and not as hard to reach, I prefer to play for people to sing it in key F. One very good reason for that is the fact that after 'Happy ...


8

Here are some suggestions Teaching oneself to sing isn't as simple as learning an instrument. There are limitations to what we can teach ourselves. Seek a teacher! What immediately concerns me is this: I cannot really get my throat voice that high, if I try it soon ends up sore It is this kind of behavior that leads to injury. If your are sore, your ...


8

Singing pitch is mainly controlled by the tension on the vocal folds. Higher pitch, higher tension. You failed to mention your age: the vocal folds (basically peripheral parts of muscles) and other movable parts of the larynx are fixed to cartilage. This cartilage construct gets a growth spurt (like a calving glacier) when your voice changes in puberty ...


8

An important distinction to be made here is the difference between range and tessitura. According to The Complete Musician by Steve Laitz, range is the total span of pitches that a voice can sing; this covers roughly the interval of a twelfth. ... a more comfortable register [is] referred to as its tessitura. Laitz then provides a chart of SATB ranges ...


8

That's not really specific to German: single-voiced vocals are typically "unisex", meaning that they are intended to be sung either by males (one octave lower than the treble clef they are written in) or females (at written pitch). Unless their range is comparatively constrained and thus universal (like typical for congregation singing), they tend ...


7

Men's voices continue to change well into their twenties. I started off as a bass (solid E2) and ended up as a mid-high bari. There's not much point in worrying about vocal classification right now. Anyway, something's off with your octave numbers, or your labeling of vocal registers. C6 is soprano high C. There's no way you're singing that in modal ...


7

Some compositions, at least, were gender-specific. Abstract: My research identifies German Lieder composed specifically for female singers. Female-specific songs were determined through textual analysis of the solo works from four influential composers of this era, Franz Schubert (1786–1828), Robert Schumann (1810–1856), Johannes Brahms (1833–1897), and ...


7

Keep straining only if you want no decent voice - ever! At your age and stage of development, it's gently gently. My baby's learned to walk - time to teach him how to jump over hurdles. Absolutely not. It may just be that you have a low voice with a low range. Nothing wrong with that. Except we all yearn for something we don't have. It's called being human. ...


6

Singing "in parts" means that each voice (such as soprano, tenor, alto, and bass) has its own independent line to follow. The contents of that line will be written out, and will depend on the composer or arranger and the harmonic structure of the piece. These parts may form consonances or dissonances with one another, and they may move in parallel motion (...


6

The octave the notes are written in is irrelevant in most transcribed pop vocals as there are many different types of vocalist. Remember we typically generalize vocals into 4 different groups Soprano, Alto, Tenor, and Bass and we also typically like to perceive the melody as well within the upper section of the treble staff so typically pop lead vocal parts ...


6

Extending your head voice downwards gives you more leeway to establish your mixed voice and/or to choose your register changes as needed. Chest voice gets more overtones as you reach higher with it, leading to a much more conspicuous change into head voice if you transition late. Training to extend your head voice downward also means that you'll not just ...


6

Interesting question; I didn't realize my own confusion until you pointed it out. According to The Harvard Dictionary of Music: Ambitus. The range of pitches employed in a melody or voice. Range. The span of pitches between highest and lowest of an instrument, voice, or part; also compass. See also Tessitura. Register. A specific segment of the total range ...


6

Reasons for starting too low: They can't sing any higher themselves. They don't realize that it's a problem for someone, and the people who have a problem don't complain, so the low key men could learn from their mistakes. They start without accompaniment and don't have a pitch reference. They do it deliberately to bully high-voiced people ... ;) Probably ...


6

You mentioned the term strain. Strain is a big problem in the voice; if you feel strain, you should stop immediately. Pain is a message from your body telling you to stop. You also mentioned that you don't know precise terminology, however. You said strain, but is it possible that the note is simply high and it is difficult for you to sing it? Depending on ...


6

Yup. If you would like to get specific (pun not intended), the song has a range of an octave plus a major second, since there are many qualities of seconds (but octaves are assumed to be perfect in this context). Getting even more technical, you could also use compound intervals to describe the situation, saying the song has a range of a major ninth, though ...


6

Nope, nothing wrong with your voice. An octave and a half chest range isn't bad. The quality of the sound in each register matters more than the range. No use for a 2 octave chest if the bottom is grunty and the top is squeaky. To work with it, two thoughts: You should focus on the transition to mix around B4 up to E5. It's quite hard, but if you can ...


5

As some other people have already mentioned, find a reputable vocal teacher to give you lessons. I myself am a bass baritone and have been taking singing lessons for the past 2-3 months or so. Before I had been struggling not only with range plateaus but worse yet, with plateaus in technique (or better said, lack of technique). Obviously, I am still ...


5

There's a lot of people that seem to tell you that you're not built to sing high but that's not exactly the truth. When i first went through puberty around 12 i couldn't sing middle c either but as i got vocal training i can now sing up to an A and feel no strain. It's a matter of how to learn to use your upper register.


5

I'd say Luke's (and user10944's) answer of an octave sounds about right for vocal parts. While typical SATB vocal ranges for your standard 4-part harmony are usually listed as about an octave and a half each, many simple melodies stay within about an octave. Depending on the melodic contour, that octave may stretch from dominant to dominant (as in Amazing ...


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