19

Simple advice is to take singing lessons. We here cannot know what you're doing and what you're doing wrong just by reading. You have to have a professional coaching you how to use your body in another way than you do now.


14

As Thomas Bryla said in another answer, there's really no substitute for working with someone who can hear what you're doing and observe your posture while you're doing it. But here are some things I have learned from years of casual choral singing as a low female voice trying to do better (I usually sing tenor): Breath support makes a big difference. If ...


12

In choral settings it is a little more relaxed about what ranges are needed and what words are used to describe the singers in them. Usually singers in choirs don't have such a need for a very soloistic or virtuosic approach to singers and thus have a slightly smaller range. In opera it is pretty much demanded that you have close to a two octave range or ...


12

If your looking for a quick fix, the only reliable one is to transpose the songs you want to sing. Even in areas with trained singers such as opera and broadway, the songs were written in keys comfortable for their first performers. Even today, some revivals of broadway shows may adjust particularly rangey songs up or down a small amount. As for anything in ...


11

I think that the discussion of tessitura is often lost in discussing ranges. If a part is well written, it will be comfortable for a singer of a given voice type to sing. Beethoven's Ninth and the Missa solemnis are thrilling works for the audience, but are murder on the singers, because they have to work so long in ranges of their voice that are ...


10

The following are average ranges for your typical amateur church choir music, based on my 20-odd years' experience in choral singing: Soprano: Bb3-E5, with optional notes up to B5 (and you very rarely see much above G5) Alto: G3-C5, primarily staying between C4 and B4 (songs requiring altos to sing higher than C5 generally do so for a specific effect, or ...


10

First off, we need to distinguish between range and tessitura. Your range is the complete set of notes that you can sing, including head tone and falsetto. Your tessitura is the range in which it is most comfortable for you to sing. Both of these change over time, and particularly for male voices, those changes can persist well into a singer's thirties. As a ...


9

What you want to do is 1. Figure out the required range of the melody (such as for example a sixth, an octave, or an octave and a fifth). That means finding the lowest note and the highest note used for the melody (and determine the interval between those). 2. Fit the middle of that melody range1 best possible to the middle of the average musically useful2 ...


9

Average untrained baritone male range is F2-D4 Average untrained tenor A2-Ab4 and will have naturally resonant falsetto/head voice up to Eb5 that can slide in and out of call register. Average Trained Baritone range is F2-G4(A4 Extreme). Average Trained tenor range is A2-C5(Eb5 Extreme). falsetto range can vary between the two, in fact some baritones can ...


8

This is a very interesting question! I would never expect an expert to try to guess someone's vocal range simply based on their ethnic heritage, but it's true that some trends do persist just like any other physical characteristic does along cultural-biological lines. For example, the term "Russian bass" has been used to refer to Eastern-European basses with ...


8

Singing pitch is mainly controlled by the tension on the vocal folds. Higher pitch, higher tension. You failed to mention your age: the vocal folds (basically peripheral parts of muscles) and other movable parts of the larynx are fixed to cartilage. This cartilage construct gets a growth spurt (like a calving glacier) when your voice changes in puberty ...


7

In my experience of leading amateur kids choirs, the comfortable range for most 4-8 year olds would be around middle C (or possibly as low as the B flat just below that) up to around D or E -- that is, just over an octave. Many kids would struggle with a low A or a high F, I think.


7

I basically asked this question on the Audio site: How can I cut out a particular instrument in the same pitch range as other instruments I don't want to cut? As you can see there, the answer is no. There's no good way for software to tell what is voice and what is not for any arbitrary voice and song combined into a single waveform. As you note it can be ...


7

Here are some suggestions Teaching oneself to sing isn't as simple as learning an instrument. There are limitations to what we can teach ourselves. Seek a teacher! What immediately concerns me is this: I cannot really get my throat voice that high, if I try it soon ends up sore It is this kind of behavior that leads to injury. If your are sore, your ...


7

According to this Reddit post, the numbers are roughly as follows: Men: 20% Bass / 45% Baritone / 35% Tenor Women: 15% Contralto / 35% Mezzo / 50% Soprano For males, the ordering implied by these numbers agree with this statement in Merriam-Webster, which is listed under the entry for "baritone": baritone In vocal music, the voice or register ...


7

Reasons for starting too low: They can't sing any higher themselves. They don't realize that it's a problem for someone, and the people who have a problem don't complain, so the low key men could learn from their mistakes. They start without accompaniment and don't have a pitch reference. They do it deliberately to bully high-voiced people ... ;) Probably ...


6

The ranges you can use depend on who is singing, of course. If you know the choir for whom you are writing your work, use their ranges to the best of your ability. In many cases, though, you are writing more for a particular type of choir: Writing for a typical church choir? Use conservative ranges, like the ones in @WheatWilliams' answer. (Note that ...


6

If you sing regularly (like in a choir, or getting lessons), you'll get a good idea from the warmup exercises you do there. So I gather that this is not your situation. Your range is probably wider than the range of a typical song that you'll sing, so what you really want to find is the most natural, comfortable part of your range. One way to do that is ...


6

Singing "in parts" means that each voice (such as soprano, tenor, alto, and bass) has its own independent line to follow. The contents of that line will be written out, and will depend on the composer or arranger and the harmonic structure of the piece. These parts may form consonances or dissonances with one another, and they may move in parallel motion (...


6

The octave the notes are written in is irrelevant in most transcribed pop vocals as there are many different types of vocalist. Remember we typically generalize vocals into 4 different groups Soprano, Alto, Tenor, and Bass and we also typically like to perceive the melody as well within the upper section of the treble staff so typically pop lead vocal parts ...


6

An important distinction to be made here is the difference between range and tessitura. According to The Complete Musician by Steve Laitz, range is the total span of pitches that a voice can sing; this covers roughly the interval of a twelfth. ... a more comfortable register [is] referred to as its tessitura. Laitz then provides a chart of SATB ranges ...


6

Interesting question; I didn't realize my own confusion until you pointed it out. According to The Harvard Dictionary of Music: Ambitus. The range of pitches employed in a melody or voice. Range. The span of pitches between highest and lowest of an instrument, voice, or part; also compass. See also Tessitura. Register. A specific segment of the ...


5

The answer to this is very simple: 1.) Go to a piano / keyboard / guitar 2.) Start at middle "C" (3rd fret A-string on guitar.) 3.) Move down 1 note / fret at a time until you can't comfortably sing with dynamics (you should be able to make sounds past this point.) 4.) Go back to middle "C" 5.) Move up 1 note / fret at a time until you can't ...


5

I'd say Luke's (and user10944's) answer of an octave sounds about right for vocal parts. While typical SATB vocal ranges for your standard 4-part harmony are usually listed as about an octave and a half each, many simple melodies stay within about an octave. Depending on the melodic contour, that octave may stretch from dominant to dominant (as in Amazing ...


5

Men's voices continue to change well into their twenties. I started off as a bass (solid E2) and ended up as a mid-high bari. There's not much point in worrying about vocal classification right now. Anyway, something's off with your octave numbers, or your labeling of vocal registers. C6 is soprano high C. There's no way you're singing that in modal ...


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