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5

The industry answer to this is Apple's Mainstage. It's only $30, but it does require an Apple laptop (and a newer one at that, it's a heavy resource hog). You can rig up any MIDI-sending pedal or button to trigger a patch advance. There are also several keyboards with this kind of functionality built-in, such as the Yamaha Motif and Korg Kronos. If you don'...


3

For now, I would transpose it down a bit to where you're more comfortable, or pick a different piece to work on, that fits your range better, to avoid strain, damage or bad habits. At 15, the jury is still out on what your range as a young adult will end up being! I hope you are still singing with an ensemble. Experiment, try a few different groups till ...


3

Many (most?) modern midi-capable synths accept "program change" midi commands to immediately change the patch. This is especially true if you have a workstation or an arranger keyboard, but any synth with pre-sets should have this. In any event "program change" is the language you'll want to search for when looking for tools. There are pedals that can be ...


3

This is clearly a countertenor. If you want to listen to a boy alto in the St Matthews passion, I suggest you listen on YouTube to the Tolzer Knabenchor either directed by Reinhard Goebel (outstanding recording but without filming) or conducted by Christian Fliegner (video). The boy alto singing this aria was Laurenz Ströbl aged 14 or 15. Very different ...


2

The video appears to be taken from a DVD that was released in September 2012. Stefan Kahle was born in August 1992. So he was probably 19 when the video was recorded, years after most boys' voices change.


1

OK this is a question that no-one here can answer because they do not know you, they have never heard you sing and they do not know how much effort you are putting into getting to the top/bottom of your range at the moment. Pushing your upper limit further has the potential to be dangerous and/or damaging; you need to take the advice of a professional ...


1

Yes, sickness certainly does affect the singing (and spoken) voice - for a period after a serious bout of flu. I would recommend giving yourself several weeks to recover, building up what you expect of your voice slowly again. Much the same way a sportsperson would return to full "match fitness" after an injury, the same is true of the voice which needs to ...


1

This is normal after such an illness, and full voice recovery should be expected within 45 days or less. It's important to note that many orally-delivered steroids will cause a thin, trebly quality to the speaking (and singing) voice, but that situation normally fades within a week after the steroid cycle is complete.


1

This is probably just a normal effect of the flu. Losing part of one's range after the flu is probably normal. I lost about an octave of high range for a few weeks after I had the flu, and it came back naturally. Trying not to sing too much might help.


1

Knowing where the breaks between the passagi exist means a singer can match their range to the tessitura of a song, so it can all be sung in a key that works best. It may be that the singer wants the same tone all through, or possibly wants the higher notes using a different voice, at which point, the key for the piece may be a tone or two higher than the ...


1

Your best bet would be to find a personal voice teacher, or at least join a choir. You will want to practice every day to optimize your voice, and it's important that you don't fall out of practice, because otherwise, you will lose your experience and it will become harder for you to pick it up again. Also, doing yoga or breathing exercises wouldn't hurt ...


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