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Chamber choirs play concert performances, church services aren't typically considered "concerts." https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chamber_choir A chamber choir is a small or medium-sized choir of roughly 8 to 40 singers (occasionally called 'chamber singers'), typically singing classical or religious music in a concert setting. (This is distinct from e.g. ...


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Hi and welcome to the Music stack exchange. What you are referring to in your examples is not so much a technique as much as it is a phenomenon known as "Passaggio" or, more commonly, a "Voice Break." It occurs when the human voice transitions between different vocal registers and is essentially the same phenomenon that some teenagers experience ...


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My deleted answer was: "Basically, one fits in a chamber and the other one in a church ;-)" To clarify: That's exactly the difference, as both can perform any kind of music, because the number of voices in any choir part rarely exceeds the number of people in a chamber choir and almost never exceeds the number of people in a church choir. Rare examples are ...


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There is an actual name for us: We are typically classed as contra_alto (not the same as alto). Generally that means female voices of tenor range but baritone included in this as well. We are rare, the lower the rarer and more wanted! The alto typically ranges from F3 to F5, where tenor ranges from C3 to C5. A baritone generally stretches from A2 to A4. ...


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This is such an older outdated post.. So I thought I would update it.. You can in fact plug a USB condenser microphone into a mixer or an interface.. You need a standard USB brick charger (like you use for any cell phone or tablet) to power the USB microphone.. Then on the microphones headphone output you use a Mic out jack to Line In jack or Mic in jack on ...


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The term would not be "descant" The term you and your director are looking for is "vocable" We use the term "vocable" to describe sounds singers make that are outside of intelligible language. Beyond "oohs" and "aahs" it would also include whoops, screams, pops, clicks, lip buzzes and any of the other thousands of sounds the human voice can make. https://...


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I'd recommend you sing it 8 times, top to bottom, rather than pull up after every line. The flow will be significantly better. If you use a multitrack-capable DAW, you can then do what's known as 'comping' - you listen to each version then edit together the best of each line, in such a way that you can't tell they were from different takes. The probability ...


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The currently accepted answer is essentially correct, but it doesn't consider the context you've mentioned in a comment: A local church have a chamber choir and I was wondering if such a choir would sing at a church service. The answer is probably yes. While it is true that "chamber choir" is typically used for small choral ensembles that present ...


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As it always is with questions like this, the answer is lots of practice. It sounds like you were being tested on sight-singing, which if you have no choral experience it makes sense that you weren't able to do it. The Tenor part is the hardest to sight sing (in my opinion and experience) since the soprano and bass lines are dominating and the alto has ...


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It was not the best plan to go to an organist without preparation and some attempts like I'm going to tell you here, if you want to avoid the risk to feel blamed again. It was not bad when you heard also the soprano. The best will be if you would try before to go to an organist to listen in a 4 part setting at all voices and sing all one by one and finally ...


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There are times when I need to sing with no accompaniment in order to accomplish what might be referred to as muscle memory for my voice. When I repeat sections of a song over and over and can hear precisely what my voice is doing, it makes it possible for me to alter expression and emotion, play with the rhythm and check my pitch. I can best do this without ...


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I would say: Yes, they need to! But they should not always. The aim is to be independent of the accompaniment but also to sing according and listening to other instruments. But like Dekkadeci seems to suggest in his comment: This will be a process. It is not helpful if they can't keep pitch and get out of tune. The best is you start with playback singing ...


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Not always easy, particularly in today's commercial music. Singers strive to make them sound as similar as possible with no discernable break, and sometimes to 'mix' the two. Also, how one singer 'places' a song may not be how YOU do.


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The answer is: "both." You need to be able to sing on your own - see "Solfege" for starters -- to train your voice and your brain to be able to stay on pitch. At the same time, you need to learn to sing with accompaniment, be it vocal or instrumental, so that you can stay in tune with the group even if they go slightly off-pitch. It's always better ...


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Reading between the lines of this question - are we asking if singers should practice singing without the original version playing? A lot of people 'sing along' with a recording. Take away the recorded voice, they realise it was doing all the work! If a song is GOING to be accompanied, by live piano or backing track, there's no particular virtue in ...


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Another resource is IMSLP. IMSLP hosts only music which is in the public domain. Its strength is music which is in the public domain because the composer died so long ago that copyright has expired. But there are also a few modern musical works whose composers have put them into the public domain. IMSLP enables you to do detailed searches. For example, here ...


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CPDL is your friend. Hit the "Multi-category sheet music search" on the front page. That will take you to a quite detailed search dialog where you can filter by several criteria, like period, voices, language, etc. etc. You will find tons of pieces, especially if you don't mind singing Renaissance songs (which CPDL seems to be particularly well stocked with)....


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You are doing something that does not feel natural yet and that will take time. I have studied classical voice for a couple years now (still a beginner). I can tell you from personal experience that you will feel strange tickles and buzzing and all sorts of weird feelings. Some are normal and some an indication of strain. You need to tell your instructor ...


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Ok, where is that itch? deep in the neck or higher? Is it really an itch or a mild strain? I am 3 months into lessons and I have a mild strain in my larnyx - above the Adam's apple ... below is the esophogus. If it's that then it's not breathing, it straining ... trying slightly too hard because you really do want to exercise getting the most sound out you ...


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There is no sure-fire way to tell and no substitute for experience listening. A general rule of thumb is how "breathy" the voice is. The breathier, the more likely to be a head voice. But you also have to take into account the individual singer and their range. Furthermore, there are singers who are so adept at making their head voice sound consistent with ...


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Not sure what you mean, because most of the song's style is not different from many other CCR songs. If you mean the parts with coarse-grained roughness in general, that is intermodulation distortion created by bringing the ventricular folds into vibration along with the vocal folds. If he does it properly, he is merely bringing his ventricular folds closer ...


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