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8

When you're singing unaccompanied, it can be difficult to stay in the same key, or even to tell whether you're staying in the same key. (Ideally, you would "play" the other instrumental parts of the song in your head while you're singing, but that doesn't come naturally if you don't play an instrument or take music or singing lessons.) If you sing along ...


6

Not even Beethoven, even when he was trying, could pull off what we now call "changing keys" for a single word. Four bars at a minimum. Your dad means something else. Ask him to phrase it differently, if he's had some musical training. Better yet, both of you listen to a recording of you singing. Have him point out where it happens therein. Then use ...


3

Not only are such exercises good for getting your voice in tune but for learning to get the correct resonance and support for all types of syllables. The specific do-re-mi- etc sequence you provided is just one of several (hundred or thousand) that one can come up with. The same sequence can be practiced using the following: Lip trill Staccato (on "pa" ...


2

I know the theoretical range for each voice type, but I would like to understand know the real ranges of singers in practice. Those are the estimated ranges for each of the voice ranges. From there on, each individual singer will have its own range. If you're a singer, do you have the same range as other singers with the same voice type? You'll have ...


2

One thing to clarify, the concept of harmonizing (to a melody), i.e. singing a different melody line, lower or higher than a given main melody, but still able to “fit well” with that given melody, is NOT the same as singing in a different key, whether higher or lower. It means both the main melody and and that different melody line you are singing (the ...


2

I usually only see a 'mouth quiver' if someone is singing with too much tension or trying to produce too big a sound without the proper technique to back it up, OR having to sing a demanding role in several performances weekly without time in between to recover or trying to perform when you're sick and should be on vocal rest.


2

"Warming ups" together with solfege (the relative doremi system) will help you to get used and find the root and tonic. There are many different vocals and consonants to train your voice, resonance rooms of head, nose, breast, to control your throat and tongue, your breathing etc. It makes a lot of sence to practice these exercises together with the ...


2

(This is supposed to be a comment!) Maybe these scores you present are transcriptions of mensural notation, which allowed for a special notation for ligatures in vocal music. Brackets above the notes are used to represent ligatures in transcriptions of mensural notation to modern notation. You may find many details on the transcription of mensural notation ...


1

I am a Soprano (classical Crossover now) and a Master Vocal Coach. The best for you will be to book a lesson with a voice instructor (certified one) to help you with your technique. One of the best methods it's called speech level singing technique: This singing technique utilizes specific exercises focus on training your particular muscles next to your ...


1

Reason for practicing with harmonium as a beginner is to make you familiar with notes. For example, if I played sa and asked you to sing ma, you'll not be able to do it without singing the whole sargam. Eventually, he will ask you to stop using harmonium once you develop a rough idea of how the notes sound. Even then, you may not be able to sing a note ...


1

If your teacher asked you to do it, then the benefit of this practising outweighs any risk of acclimatizing to equal temperament, especially if you also do some practice away from equal temperament. Even within the European tradition, unaccompanied choirs and string quartets have no difficulty producing chords and melodies untampered by equal temperament, ...


1

Some actors only take parts where they can be themselves. What you see is pretty well what they are like in real life. Watch a good character actor, and you'll be convinced that's what they're like in real life. Except they're not. They take on a different persona - characteristics, gait, facial expressions, accent, etc. You seem like you need to do a fair ...


1

The ability of kids to mimic all kinds of singing is so constantly amazing that it hardly surprises us any more :-) Being able to hit a high note is good, but not of earth-shattering import. Being able to pick up new material readily is more interesting. Sounds like she'll swan through the choir auditions. Why not just take it from there for the time ...


1

OK this is a question that no-one here can answer because they do not know you, they have never heard you sing and they do not know how much effort you are putting into getting to the top/bottom of your range at the moment. Pushing your upper limit further has the potential to be dangerous and/or damaging; you need to take the advice of a professional ...


1

I could explain all the basic models of vibrating systems, string under tension, stiff rods and plates with boundary conditions, air columns, etc. But I am not sure that would answer you question. For one thing one of your basic statements is simply not true (and I think you suspected it). "With singing I generally understand that changes by step are ...


1

Increasing tension in a particular muscle raises pitch. (Secondary effects apply, too, but they really are secondary for this question.) The larger the leap, the harder it is to hit the target pitch accurately and quickly. This trade-off between leap distance, pitch accuracy, and speed is just an application of Fitts's Law. "Visualizing" a pitch before ...


1

It's called vocal fry, vocal growl, or vocal distortion. Yes, it can sound great live.


1

Jawbrato or Gospel Jaw ...describes a method of simulating vibrato by rapidly quivering the jaw and tongue. This movement creates rapid changes in tone and in vowel formation, leaving the listener with the impression that the singer is creating vibrato. However, the vibrato that is produced by moving the jaw or head is generally not very natural sounding, ...


1

Tim was right. The chords sounded too muddy with a baritone guitar.


1

As a professional voice instructor, I can assure you there's not much you need to worry about. Many times a natural vibrato (as long as it's variation in pitch, not air control - i.e. inconsistent breath support, and not laryngeal or "gospel jaw") is actually sign of proper singing technique. This includes things like proper diaphragmatic support, posture, ...


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