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9

Premise: I'm italian, and I am really fanatic about our language pronunciation and writing, including their meaning, context and history, especially when related to music. Now, the keyword here is elision, even if this often happens as a similar aspect, apocope. The elision is when an unstressed vowel (or syllable) is omitted at the end of a word when the ...


4

A composer may indicate in the score that a role is intended for a "high tenor" (which does not mean a countertenor). An example is the role of Henry Morosus in Richard Strauss's opera Die schweigsame Frau (The Silent Woman). Another example is the role of the Italian Singer in his opera Der Rosenkavalier, who has but a single aria in the whole ...


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The 'e' at the end of 'languisce' and the 'i' of 'il' should both be pronounced, with a legato connection. Cecilia Bartoli and Luciano Pavarotti both sing it that way, both are Italian, and both are the pinnacle of singers. NOTE: where one needs to be careful is in switching between the 'e' and 'i' vowel sounds that the purity of each is preserved. You don't ...


3

Choosing a music teacher can be very much a matter of "personal fit," not just competence. In my undergrad music school, one teacher regularly browbeat his students until they left in tears—and some thrived under such a strict regimen. My teacher was low-key, upbeat, and encouraged creative initiative, and was definitely the right match for me. ...


3

This is an old-fashioned vocal notation practice. From the looks of it, the music in the question seems old enough to have been written in the traditional style. Current musical notation standard practice uses beaming to indicate groupings of subdivisions of the beat; in a 4/4 time signature, eighth notes get beamed together in those groupings to visually ...


2

As a pretty typical 2nd tenor, I find the lower end of the baritone range is difficult to sing in a performance setting because I cannot get any power or emotion into it. I think that is probably typical anyone trying to sing lower than is normal - they might be in tune but that's about it.


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My recommendation is to reach out to every single performer and musician within your circle of friends and cohorts, and ask them point-blank; "How is my singing, and how do you recommend I improve it?" The more we interact with other performers and musicians, the more we gain valuable feedback and advice. Tips, tricks, and thoughtful perspective. ...


1

It's the old style. OK, it shows where the syllables come, and where there's a melisma (more than one note to a syllable). But it obscures the rhythmic patterns of the music. It might have something to do with vocalist's legendary inability to count! (And I don't altogether offer that in jest.) The modern style is to beam to the rhythms as for other ...


1

It is a common standard in vocal music to notate every syllable independently and not to beam them. Beams are reserved for singing multiple notes on the same syllable. The advantage to the older system of no beams is that it makes clear syllabic versus melismatic singing. The advantage of the modern system of consistent beaming is that it makes the rhythm ...


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