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11

Perhaps because singers are more likely not to have learned scales in such a formal way as guitarists, i.e. the names, the intervals between the notes etc. The fretboard on a guitar lays out a series of semitones for each string. A student guitarist will most likely learn at least some scales appropriate for the type of music they are learning. The voice has ...


8

First of all, the question is about improvisation (or composing, which is very slow improvisation), deciding what notes to produce. If someone has already made all the decisions and written down the notes, then scales are irrelevant, except maybe from an instrument-technical fingering perspective. There are two main styles or approaches to improvisation: (1) ...


8

Imagine being completely deaf, not being able to hear what sounds you produce. With a well-tuned guitar, or piano, you'd still be able to bang out a tune, knowing which notes constitute it. But try singing that tune. Doubtful it'll be successful. Main reason is that there are certain places where the notes live on guitar (as in OP), whereas with vox, the ...


6

Scales have very much to do with finger patterns-- accidentals in piano, fret patterns in guitar. A singer doesn't need any of that-- they just need to know what sound they want to create.


6

Playing a musical instrument is a physical skill which needs to be learned like any other physical skill. If you don't play a musical instrument of any kind then the physical skill to play a particular instrument will be completely new. You will have to learn from scratch. To that end playing scales is a useful repetitive exercise which gives you basic ...


6

A musician who plays from notation probably doesn't NEED to understand scales, though practising them can be very useful for achieving dexterity and recognising the patterns that occur in what he's reading. Some singers may not read, but they generally learn songs by imitation, which comes down to much the same thing. But guitar seems to have attracted a ...


5

One basic reason is that in guitar (or piano — my background), one has to associate physical adjustments to sound (i.e., where to put our fingers) more explicitly than with singing. Playing a certain note or chord on guitar requires placing certain fingers at certain positions on the instrument; we don't think of things the same way with singing. So, at this ...


5

We use our voices every day, and have since birth. Even the most precocious savants used their voices long before other instruments. Hear-and-imitate is how we learn language, which is one of the first things we ever learn. We can sing along with the choruses of songs we're hearing for the first time, but I've seen guitarists I admire struggle with playing ...


4

The problem I hear is that your pitch drops during vowel changes. It's especially noticeable moving through the words "bloody nose / sleepin'": "nose" is very slightly flat, as is "sleepin'". In general you're on pitch, so exercises that focus on maintaining pitch across vowels is where I'd suggest you start. There are two ...


4

These are vocal multiphonics. There is an instructional video which describes the technique in very similar terms to the OP. To get that extra bit of overtones going on, you just go to the break point of your falsetto (Glen Soulis, 0:51 in linked video) There is a detailed discussion of a variety of vocal multiphonics ...


4

Improvisation - my feeling (not as a jazz singer, and at best semi-professional) is that improvisation, as opposed to "colouring" the line, isn't as common a thing for vocalists than for instrumentalists (scat aside). So those skills aren't as called for. Other things besides improvisation, that matter though: unless you have perfect (or trained) ...


3

Your range is small because you aren't properly accessing your head voice and mix and are just using a pushy chest in its place (which is unhealthy). Your head voice (if properly developed) is part of your full range and will probably give you at least an octave up top if not more (considering that your lowest note is a G3 indicating that you're probably a ...


3

I have been a bad singer for 5 years, an OK singer for 10 and now a pretty diverse and consistent professional vocalist for ten years and still learning. Just like anything associated with skill and talent you beat your self up for making mistakes, over work , and constantly challenge your self. When you have some success and you overcome your difficulties, ...


3

I could say a character wakes up sad one day but knows music cheers him up, so he takes out the instruments and plays until he gets tired, and the question would be how much time has passed before the next scene occurs The answer is another question: "How long is a piece of string?" To make it clear let me change the subject in your question from ...


2

Lots of guitarist use the "chord/scale" system. If given a progression like ii V I, that system will say to play scales dorian, mixolydian, and ionian respectively for each chord. "Classically" oriented voice and piano students will learn harmony. If given ii V I, they will understand it's one progression in a major key, associate voice ...


2

The only way to work on pitch is... to work on pitch. That is to say focus on simple diatonic exercises with some vocalization and move them chromatically up and down the piano to the ends of your range. Different syllables will feel different and require some adjustment of the mouth to get good resonance. Interestingly enough there is a single mouth shape ...


2

It's going to vary quite a bit, and depend mostly on two variables: individual stamina and the method of sound production. I'm primarily a guitarist. If I've been playing for five hours and I have to play a song that has a very high note, fatigue isn't really going to hinder me. But the trumpet player on the same gig may struggle, as he or she has been ...


1

It varies from person to person. Factors are health, environment, ergonomics, technique, diet, sleep . . . A pianist with an ergonomic technique will not tire because gravity does all the work. All they need is proper alignment and they can endure for a long time. Gravity will keep them relaxed. It is called resting up. I once played two fourteen hour ...


1

Feed the audio from all the sources into a mixer. Use the mixer's routing capabilities to send your chosen selection of them to the streaming input and (maybe a different selection) to your headphones. Behringer, among others, offes a range of cheap mixers that will do this.


1

Having an instrument like a harmonium or guitar while learning to sing is very helpful, but not necessary. It is helpful, because it can guide your pitch, giving you a sound to which to match your voice. It can also be used to provide accompaniment to your singing. Keyboard instruments and guitar are perhaps the most common instruments to learn along with (...


1

If you have to push hard, you're singing wrong and you can damage your voice. I also noted you said you starting mixing around E4 to F4. I can tell you, as a second bass, that if you start in chest voice, it's extremely hard, if not impossible, to switch into mix that way. I was taught to start in mix and remain in mix so that when I switch to head voice, ...


1

"How does it help the singer? How does it help the listener?" First of all the ability to go into (natural) vibrato at any given point shows the singer that he has a very good vocal technique. Second, of course, vibrato is a means of musical, emotional expression that is enjoyable for both the singer and the listener, if used tastefully. "Is ...


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