Hot answers tagged

33

Yes, roughly. The standard ranges are often listed as: Bass: E2-E4 Baritone: A2-A4 Tenor: C3-C5 Contralto: F3-F5 Mezzo-soprano: A3-A5 Soprano: C4-C6 You can see that the three women's ranges are one octave above the corresponding men's, with one slight exception. Of course, everyone's voice is unique and few people fit cleanly into these categories. ...


29

As Michael Curtis has pointed out, from the linguistic side, the study of phonetics is all about what speech sounds humans make and how they make them. Phonetics doesn't really approach things from a musical perspective, so I thought I might try to make some correlations between phonetics and musical acoustics. Phonetics divides speech sounds (phonemes) ...


28

There are many aspects to hard rock singing, and each singer (hell, each song) has a different approach. I know that even death metal vocalists can do their scary vocals without doctoring them in the studio, and I know some really "clean"-sounding singers have to fix uo the tone in the studio. So it depends a lot. In hard rock, a lot of the "aggresiveness" ...


28

The term "harmony" itself is what you are looking for. Being able to sing in harmony (2 or more different voices) with someone however doesn't require any more skills or theory than singing alone or in unison (same notes, only one voice) because everyone learns "his notes" as he would do singing alone. The only thing I could think of is having a good ear, ...


25

Voice is an 'instrument' that many people learn in almost an ideal way. We start young, and practice with it very frequently - even speaking teaches you how to control the pitch of your voice. And because it's an instrument that everyone has, almost everyone also learns to sing in various environments, from singing rhymes in nursery school, to singing along ...


25

Singing together but different notes is singing in harmony. Singing the same notes would be singing in unison.


24

Your tone isn't bad at all, what you need to work on is your intonation. What do I mean by that? Firstly, let's define our terms more specifically; non-musicians often use "bad tone", "off key", "out of tune" and "flat" and similar terms quite interchangeably, but in musical language they refer to something specific, and different. Tone When musicians ...


21

Both, but talent and practice tend to refer to very nearly the same thing (It's hard to separate innate musical ability from ability conditioned from dedicated practice). Let's clarify your question as "Genetics or practice". Practice will take you into the realm of professional singing. It's not enough to get you big solos, but it is enough to get ...


20

If you can hear yourself being out of tune, chances are you can teach yourself to fix it... or work with a vocal coach who is experienced enough in communicating HOW to change your technique... I've worked miracles with students who thought they couldn't sing in the past, and the results are wonderful for both teacher and student. On the other hand, if you ...


20

Simple solution - record yourself and play it back, to yourself and others. Do it a capella after giving yourself a key, and play along to the recording; and while playing guitar,You'll soon find out. It also sorts out good friends from bad! Playing and singing with others also gives good feedback.


20

Technically vibrato is going in and out of "tune." But that is controlled, and I think that is the key to approaching the question. If it's deliberate, creating some intended effect, it seems like a valid musical choice. All kinds of slides, half-sung notes, etc. are used by singers and add life to a performance. By comparison when I hear a very "clean" ...


19

Simple advice is to take singing lessons. We here cannot know what you're doing and what you're doing wrong just by reading. You have to have a professional coaching you how to use your body in another way than you do now.


19

This is all a bit stream of consciousness... hope I didn't drift too far from the plot ;-) People who sing out of tune rarely sing consistently out of tune. People who really cannot sing tend also to not be able to identify correct pitches at all - to greater or lesser degree. They're not fighting an inner tuning, they just don't have one. The ability to ...


19

It's been about 8 months since your range was limited by illness. You mention slowly re-building your range: How long did this process last? This article by an otolaryngologist explains: Fortunately, the common cold and the flu are self-limiting infections, which resolve in 7 to 10 days. For the singer and vocal performer, full recovery may take 2 to 3 ...


18

You can use software to analyze your voice. There is software that will draw a chart of what you sang (the frequencies you sang), where you can see how close or far you were from each note. Some options include Melodyne, Waves Tune, Nectar, Canta, GSnap. There are a lot of options out there, from all the price range (some free). On these charts your voice ...


18

This is actually not uncommon. You perform all of them! In this example, the soprano section splits into two parts. Half of the sopranos sing the top note, and the other half of the sopranos sing the bottom note. At the same time, the tenor section splits into two parts. First and second soprano, first and second tenor. Therefore in this short example ...


17

Learning to create your own vocal harmony part along with a melody is often something that musicians learn intuitively, through listening to a lot of music, but also by singing in a band or choir. Having said this, there is nothing wrong with taking a short cut towards gaining this skill, by using a little musical knowledge. You can create vocal (or any ...


16

I'll answer the "When should I" of your question simply, and from the experience of someone with a music ed degree, but no formal voice training. I do know the basics of vocal training and education, and have had a little myself. I won't delve into the different physiological differences with the falsetto voice, since that's been awhile… :) For most male ...


16

I think user45266's answer is spot-on - I would just add that singing also typically involves aligning the syllables in time with a musical rhythm. Loosely, perhaps one could say: Speaking is the utterance of words with pitch, pitch inflections and timings as expected for normal communication in the language in question. Typically, variations in pitch and ...


15

For goodness' sake, get thee to a voice instructor! Rock/blues stars who appear to be screaming and shredding their vocal cords have taken many lessons in how to produce that sound structure without actually stressing their throat. (or their career is less than a couple years long :-( ).


15

Sounds to me like he's pushing his voice a lot harder to get over the band volume. In an acoustic situation, he's singing in a more relaxed way, but put all the instruments in, at a volume which is probably unnecessary anyway, and the sing becomes more of a shout. By turning up his mic a balance will partially be restored, (but his ears will still tell him ...


15

There's an excellent book by Gerald Klickstein called The Musician's Way that is the best treatment of this topic I've come across. Klickstein is a guitarist as well, but the methodology he advocates is applicable to any instrumentalist Keep a practice log Split your practice time among these broad categories: New material Developing material Performance ...


15

You can try this for yourself. Sing a note, to any vowel sound (try them all) and whilst doing so, close your lips. Now you're humming that same note. Feel any difference? Probably not, because the note itself is made further back. Somewhat like putting a mute on a trumpet bell, or covering a loudspeaker with something. All you're doing is muting the sound ...


15

Firstly, a single oscillator will tend to produce rather a subjectively 'thin' and static sound. This isn't always the case (as later stages, such as the filter, or a separate chorus stage, can add warmth and movement), and it isn't always a bad thing - but of course if you want to have a one-oscillator sound on a synth that has more oscillators, you can ...


15

When is out of tune ok? Most of the time. You could write a whole book on all the situations in which 'out of tune' is the norm - from the individual harmonics of stringed instruments, to temperaments of scales, to chorus pedals, to blue notes, to 'unpitched' percussion instruments and spoken passages of indeterminate pitch.... as well as not hitting an ...


14

I recommend to practice listening. Take a piece of music with a polyphonic structure or many instruments and the notes and try to listen to a particular instrument. Start with simple pieces, for example a choral piece where you already know the bass quite well and you can switch between listening to the soprano and the bass or a piece with voice ...


14

Wikipedia says: The issue of the female falsetto voice has been met with some controversy, especially among vocal pedagogists. Many books on the art of singing completely ignore this issue, simply gloss over it, or insist that women do not have falsetto. This controversy, however, does not exist within the speech pathology community and arguments ...


14

As Thomas Bryla said in another answer, there's really no substitute for working with someone who can hear what you're doing and observe your posture while you're doing it. But here are some things I have learned from years of casual choral singing as a low female voice trying to do better (I usually sing tenor): Breath support makes a big difference. If ...


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