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5

In the case where an instrumentalist doubles their own improvisation with voice, there is not a specific term. Slam Stewart made his name doubling his bass in this way, having gotten the idea from Ray Perry, who did the same in his violin solos (recording not readily available). In general, it's considered something of a novelty. Some musicians famously ...


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I think you will find lots of information by reading about poetry and meter. Scansion is the "scanning" of a line of text to determine its meter. That is probably an important thing for you to look into. The basic idea is poetry (lyrics) can be written to fit into regular metrical patterns like iambic which is short/long or weak/strong. There are ...


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You can certainly use multiple instruments to voice chords, the real question is how to do it gracefully and get a good result. And for that, you'll need more that a few suggestions... Here's a nice article that may help you get started. (I'm using the copy from archive.org because it looks like the website that was hosting the page is having some issues) ...


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The answer is no; the style of scat singing in unison along with an instrumental solo, or doubling it at an octave (like George Benson) does not have a specific, concise name (as far as I can tell).


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I think the terms you want to use are track or channel, level, balance, and mix. In a recording you can have multiple tracks for instruments. In live performance they are called channels. Well, I suppose you have channels for both recordings and live - it's just the electronic path - the track would be the channel's data recorded to some media. The track/...


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Try this: get any song, rewrite the lyrics using the same melody (parody), turn off the song and create a new melody. Or sing it with the same melody. That's similar how Yesterday (Beatles) was born. The original lyrics was about Scrambled Eggs I like using Randomizer for faster songwriting. Random Music Generators https://random-music-generators.herokuapp....


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Polyphony is the term. You can name specific genres like round or madrigal but they don't make sense to use when your examples are rock music. This is sort of a "trick" based on presenting the two lines separately as verse and chorus and then combining them later. If the listener doesn't know anything about harmony and counterpoint it seems like ...


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There is no term that specifically denotes multiple simultaneous vocal lines while excluding multiple simultaneous instrumental lines. There are many terms that denote various ways in which multiple parts are played or sung at once, and some of those ways are historically or primarily vocal styles (fauxbourdon, for example). Some of these terms (including ...


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I think the term you're looking for is counterpoint. See the song, "One Day More" from the musical, Les Misérables, which is an excellent example. The song is deconstructed in this Wikipedia entry: (scroll to the "Composition" section): https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/One_Day_More


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