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47

The notes with stems up are for singing in Italian, while the notes with the stems down are for singing in German. Thus, in the first picture of the original posting, in Italian it would be ... while in German you should sing In the second picture of the original posting, the Italian lyrics have only one syllable (“voi”) while the German lyrics have two ...


29

As Michael Curtis has pointed out, from the linguistic side, the study of phonetics is all about what speech sounds humans make and how they make them. Phonetics doesn't really approach things from a musical perspective, so I thought I might try to make some correlations between phonetics and musical acoustics. Phonetics divides speech sounds (phonemes) ...


28

There are many aspects to hard rock singing, and each singer (hell, each song) has a different approach. I know that even death metal vocalists can do their scary vocals without doctoring them in the studio, and I know some really "clean"-sounding singers have to fix uo the tone in the studio. So it depends a lot. In hard rock, a lot of the "aggresiveness" ...


28

The term "harmony" itself is what you are looking for. Being able to sing in harmony (2 or more different voices) with someone however doesn't require any more skills or theory than singing alone or in unison (same notes, only one voice) because everyone learns "his notes" as he would do singing alone. The only thing I could think of is having a good ear, ...


25

Voice is an 'instrument' that many people learn in almost an ideal way. We start young, and practice with it very frequently - even speaking teaches you how to control the pitch of your voice. And because it's an instrument that everyone has, almost everyone also learns to sing in various environments, from singing rhymes in nursery school, to singing along ...


25

Singing together but different notes is singing in harmony. Singing the same notes would be singing in unison.


20

Technically vibrato is going in and out of "tune." But that is controlled, and I think that is the key to approaching the question. If it's deliberate, creating some intended effect, it seems like a valid musical choice. All kinds of slides, half-sung notes, etc. are used by singers and add life to a performance. By comparison when I hear a very "clean" ...


16

I think user45266's answer is spot-on - I would just add that singing also typically involves aligning the syllables in time with a musical rhythm. Loosely, perhaps one could say: Speaking is the utterance of words with pitch, pitch inflections and timings as expected for normal communication in the language in question. Typically, variations in pitch and ...


15

When is out of tune ok? Most of the time. You could write a whole book on all the situations in which 'out of tune' is the norm - from the individual harmonics of stringed instruments, to temperaments of scales, to chorus pedals, to blue notes, to 'unpitched' percussion instruments and spoken passages of indeterminate pitch.... as well as not hitting an ...


15

I just googled Sprechstimme According to Encyclopaedia Britannica it's a cross between speaking and singing in which the tone quality of speech is heightened and lowered in pitch along melodic contours indicated in the musical notation. Its introduction is especially associated with the composer Arnold Schoenberg, who first used it in his Pierrot Lunaire (...


14

It depends, is the answer. And it also depends on what you call "distortion" - do you mean it in the sense that a guitarist would, or just that the sound is changed? Microphones are the first potential source of distortion. Sometimes you want a "smooth" mic, but sometimes you want one which puts a bit more "grit" inio the sound. Mics are fairly consistent ...


11

If I were pressed to answer, I'd say that singing is vocalising at defined and intentional frequencies. Speaking does not require any conscious effort to control the pitch of one's voice, and it doesn't need to have a clear pitch (whispering, vocal fry). In some music, of course, the line gets blurred. Often, singers will deliver a line in a spoken way, ...


10

Your playing needs to be in the same key you're thinking about i.e. singing in, and there are basically two different approaches to do the coordination. A: playing adjusts to singing: find the key you're singing in B: singing adjusts to playing: give yourself a harmonic reference before starting to sing, in order to try and force the singing to be in a key ...


8

Possibly soli? In my experience, it means a solo for an entire section. For example, a saxophone soli would be a feature for all the saxophones in a big band. Google tells me it has other meanings in different contexts, so it may not be a universally applicable term.


8

I think you might be best served by linguistics, specifically phonetics. Pitch is sort of an element, but specific pitch isn't the concern. Instead, some vocal sounds are "voiced" meaning the vocal chords vibrate (producing pitches.) For example, the f in 'fan is not voiced, but when voiced it becomes v like 'van.' How vowel and consonant sounds are ...


8

Perhaps I (and Cheddar) can be of assistance. Essentially, this video covers how the invention of the microphone influenced the early 20th century music/recording industry and how it changed the music being produced, including the shift in popularity from tenors-only to more baritone/bass voices. Namely, male singers had ...


8

When you're singing unaccompanied, it can be difficult to stay in the same key, or even to tell whether you're staying in the same key. (Ideally, you would "play" the other instrumental parts of the song in your head while you're singing, but that doesn't come naturally if you don't play an instrument or take music or singing lessons.) If you sing along ...


7

There is the concept (not specific to music) of Speech Tempo. As you will see from the article, there is some degree of discussion about how this should be measured - for example, words per minute, syllables per second, or sounds per second. One could imagine even deeper levels of granularity - such as the inclusion of changes in pitch or timbre as sound '...


6

The "gritty" sound in rock singer's voices is their natural voice, albeit a technique that gives the sense of screaming or growling. Something else that should be considered is that there are many hard-rock style singers who are smokers, which can significantly affect a singer's voice. Note: Increasing your risk for lung cancer is not worth it to achieve a ...


6

It's sympathetic vibration! Most objects have a fundamental pitch. Flick a glass, and it rings at a certain frequency. Sing in a bathroom, and one pitch (a very low one) will sound louder and richer than others. Blow across the top of a bottle, you'll hear one note - its fundamental pitch. Seems like your crown/post has that pitch on the note where it ...


6

Not even Beethoven, even when he was trying, could pull off what we now call "changing keys" for a single word. Four bars at a minimum. Your dad means something else. Ask him to phrase it differently, if he's had some musical training. Better yet, both of you listen to a recording of you singing. Have him point out where it happens therein. Then use ...


6

Yup. If you would like to get specific (pun not intended), the song has a range of an octave plus a major second, since there are many qualities of seconds (but octaves are assumed to be perfect in this context). Getting even more technical, you could also use compound intervals to describe the situation, saying the song has a range of a major ninth, though ...


6

No. Try it and you will see how awful it sounds. There may be exceptions to this general rule, but they will be rare. In fact, it is common for song collections to be available in different keys for high, medium, and low voice. Were they specific to male or female singers, there would be twice as many editions, labeled for soprano, tenor, mezzo soprano, ...


6

When I started studying music, I thought my instructor was going to teach me everything I wanted to know about music. My lessons were once a week for thirty minutes and I practiced each day to prepare for my next lesson. Things progressed nicely and I thought I was on the right track, but then I started to realize there were holes in my learning. My solution ...


5

The top barbershop quartets very specifically use just intonation as well as vowel modification to maximize overtone ringing. And it's likely that other top a cappella groups veer in that direction, some by instinct and others deliberately. But the average a cappella choir likely can't tell the difference between just and well tempered intonation. Lots of ...


5

The Beatles' distinctive vocal sound was shaped largely by double-tracking, in which the singer would record himself twice, attempting to repeat the performance exactly as before. Later recordings used the equipment to accomplish a similar audio effect on only one recorded track: automatic double tracking. A similar, but scarier, effect is obtained in ...


5

This is called the "tonic sol–fa" system. Created by a guy named John Curwen, it's not exactly a singing system like solfège, but rather a notation system. At the risk of publicizing myself, I asked (and subsequently answered) a question on this exact distinction at What exactly is the "tonic sol–fa" system, and how is it different from solfè...


5

Short Answer: Yes, it will get lower. Longer Answer: You should know first that your voice won’t fully mature until you are in your 30’s. Even after you finish adolescence, your voice will continue to change and mature throughout your 20’s and into your 30’s, and these changes are especially noticeable if you have regular vocal training. This happens to ...


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