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47

The notes with stems up are for singing in Italian, while the notes with the stems down are for singing in German. Thus, in the first picture of the original posting, in Italian it would be ... while in German you should sing In the second picture of the original posting, the Italian lyrics have only one syllable (“voi”) while the German lyrics have two ...


11

I guess this is the intended range for the exercises. I.e. the first exercise top note is c, so they suggest to transpose it up in half-tone steps by up to a perfect fifth, when that note becomes g, as noted in the circle. Please note this is a suggestion from the author and you should adjust it to your own voice range.


10

Your playing needs to be in the same key you're thinking about i.e. singing in, and there are basically two different approaches to do the coordination. A: playing adjusts to singing: find the key you're singing in B: singing adjusts to playing: give yourself a harmonic reference before starting to sing, in order to try and force the singing to be in a key ...


10

Any vocal work can only be fully appreciated by listening to it in the original language, whether that language is German (Schubert's "Winterreise", or any Wagner or Strauss opera) or Italian (Puccini, Verdi etc.), because a translation nearly always loses some of the detail of the original. In extreme cases the whole meaning can be lost, ...


7

There can never be one key that a singer is happy in for every song they sing. That's simply because each song, in whatever key, has its own range - between the lowest and highest notes in that particular song.And just because D works for you for a lot certainly doesn't mean 'that's the key I sing in'. I've heard too many singers say that. It will certainly ...


6

Yup. If you would like to get specific (pun not intended), the song has a range of an octave plus a major second, since there are many qualities of seconds (but octaves are assumed to be perfect in this context). Getting even more technical, you could also use compound intervals to describe the situation, saying the song has a range of a major ninth, though ...


6

No. Try it and you will see how awful it sounds. There may be exceptions to this general rule, but they will be rare. In fact, it is common for song collections to be available in different keys for high, medium, and low voice. Were they specific to male or female singers, there would be twice as many editions, labeled for soprano, tenor, mezzo soprano, ...


6

When I started studying music, I thought my instructor was going to teach me everything I wanted to know about music. My lessons were once a week for thirty minutes and I practiced each day to prepare for my next lesson. Things progressed nicely and I thought I was on the right track, but then I started to realize there were holes in my learning. My solution ...


5

Can a singer eventually hope to attain true "12 key" technique as most instrumentalists can (of course some keys will always be a bit easier...) I don't think this is the question of the keys but of the pitch and the range of your voice. You'll have to train the vowels in all pitches and ranges (what you mean by "keys" and have to find out the best ...


5

You'll probably find the lowest bass voices in Russian choral music, reaching down to C1 (32.7 Hz). Such low basses are called Oktavists: The Power of the Russian Oktavist


5

People who simply cannot sing, aim for the octave down & still fail to hit anything properly are generally known as groaners, a term I first heard in about 1967. [possibly related to the same term being applied in recent times to movie zombies] btw, Google translate really doesn't seem to know what to make of 'brummer' though low down the list is ...


5

Neither are particularly precise terms. 'Tone deaf' describes people who have trouble with recognising pitch. 'Amusia' would also include problems with other elements of music like rhythm or timbre. Or that's what musicians would say 'tone deaf' means. The wider community might apply it to someone who just doesn't 'get' music in any way - appreciation or ...


5

Play the piano part as written. In most song accompaniments (except in special situations like songs for young children, or where the player is meant to be leading the audience singing, etc) the accompaniment does not "double" the voice part, and it will work fine sung in either a male or a female voice range. There may be a few exceptions to this in songs ...


5

To add to some already good answers, one reason it can be so worthwhile to know the original language is to fully appreciate the text–music relationships that the composer set. There's a technique known as text painting (or word painting) where a composer makes a musical reference to the text being sung. Perhaps there's a chilly wind that passes the ...


5

In the case where an instrumentalist doubles their own improvisation with voice, there is not a specific term. Slam Stewart made his name doubling his bass in this way, having gotten the idea from Ray Perry, who did the same in his violin solos (recording not readily available). In general, it's considered something of a novelty. Some musicians famously ...


4

If your teacher asked you to do it, then the benefit of this practising outweighs any risk of acclimatizing to equal temperament, especially if you also do some practice away from equal temperament. Even within the European tradition, unaccompanied choirs and string quartets have no difficulty producing chords and melodies untampered by equal temperament, ...


4

Reason for practicing with harmonium as a beginner is to make you familiar with notes. For example, if I played sa and asked you to sing ma, you'll not be able to do it without singing the whole sargam. Eventually, he will ask you to stop using harmonium once you develop a rough idea of how the notes sound. Even then, you may not be able to sing a note ...


4

I agree with Albrecht's answer that you should record yourself then transcribe what you are singing. But I will also add this. The human voice can sing a continuum of tones and most modern instruments, especially the piano, cannot! You may be singing notes that simply do not exist in 12TET tuning. This is not a bad thing as plenty of cultures, e.g. India,...


4

Hi and welcome to the Music stack exchange. What you are referring to in your examples is not so much a technique as much as it is a phenomenon known as "Passaggio" or, more commonly, a "Voice Break." It occurs when the human voice transitions between different vocal registers and is essentially the same phenomenon that some teenagers experience ...


4

The answer is simple: this is a low-pitched hymn arrangement in general. It's very similar to this one, though the last couple measures of the tenor line are varied. This is a very old arrangement of "Silent Night" found in many hymnals, and typically pitched in B-flat. Note that the soprano is very low for most of the song, going down to a low B-flat (...


4

1) You will have more than one passaggi. The orientation of those passaggi will determine your fach, ultimately. 2) Physically speaking, you're still not 100% developed. If you're serious about becoming a classically trained, bel canto singer, you should be concentrating on developing your technique. I recommend reading a bit of Richard Miller ($20 tops), ...


4

I'm having trouble reconciling... ...on a hobby level...just for fun ...and... ...but they bored me when they started to teach me how to read music, play it in tempo etc. ...with... ...I think my voice sounds terrible ...and... ...I want to learn how to sing By what standard of singing? If all you are doing is entertaining yourself, and ...


4

You could never go wrong taking lessons from an experienced teacher. The problem with trying to teach yourself is that you don't know how to critique yourself and if you are doing something wrong you might hurt you vocal chords, or develop other problems. In my opinion it is not obvious what's going on inside the body and a good teacher will be able to ...


4

If your goal is to find which octave the original recording is... just go to the keyboard and find which note matches the voice on the recording. This process can be tedious at first but will help you to develop your ear for hearing which octave something is in. Know that identifying octave instantaneously is not a crucial musical skill unlike identifying ...


4

Outside of the V -> I cadence and the occasional Plagal motion from IV to I, leaps in the voice leading are generally in only 1 voice. Having a progression that is all root position triads and isn't planing or a simple IV -> V -> I is awkward, especially in the Classical Style that people like Beethoven, Haydn, and Mozart wrote in. Even Chopin has ...


4

Nope, nothing wrong with your voice. An octave and a half chest range isn't bad. The quality of the sound in each register matters more than the range. No use for a 2 octave chest if the bottom is grunty and the top is squeaky. To work with it, two thoughts: You should focus on the transition to mix around B4 up to E5. It's quite hard, but if you can ...


4

I think your problem has to do with apposition. Once you've got the feel of the thing you shouldn't encounter this difficulty again. You need to know how it feels to play this kind of syncopation. So. Forget about your right hand for a minute. 1) Get your foot tapping in crotchets. Tap with the heel, not the toe. 2) Keep the foot going. Make all the LH ...


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