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34

You could be not reaching those high notes for any of these reasons: You are young and your voice is still developing your vocal technique is bad you're doing the wrong exercises and over-straining your voice you have a naturally low voice, and you'll never hit those notes Only a qualified voice teacher will be able to tell you which of these is the case, ...


19

One other place where we find large crowds of people singing songs together is worship music- so perhaps we can find relevant advice there. The general consensus* is that the most friendly keys for congregational singing will be the keys which place the melody in the range of C to C, roughly. It doesn't technically matter which C's, really, as men will ...


15

Theoretically yes. Most probably, no. As with many other things, a teacher is not absolutely fundamental, but a professional guidance ensures that: you follow an appropriate didactic path tailored on you, your needs and capabilities, focusing on improving your gaps and enhancing your strengths; you don't lose time with unnecessary or even wrong suggestions ...


13

This vocal style comes from the American traditions of close harmony. As popular music (and the radio) came into being in the 20th century, it took influence from the styles of its times, just as any emerging style of music does. Looking back even further, the roots of this vocal style can be traced back to the 1800s and are likely also traceable to African ...


12

Perhaps because singers are more likely not to have learned scales in such a formal way as guitarists, i.e. the names, the intervals between the notes etc. The fretboard on a guitar lays out a series of semitones for each string. A student guitarist will most likely learn at least some scales appropriate for the type of music they are learning. The voice has ...


11

To be realistic, different people have different ranges. If everyone had the range of Mariah Carey or Axel Rose they would use it. However Taylor Swift only has just over 2 octaves and she has managed quite well. As others have said; don't strain but remember that falsetto or even whistle registers might be available to you. This is a way of getting extra ...


11

This is very anecdotal, & I of course can't speak for all productions, but way back in the mists of time [the 80's] I used to do session BVs on occasion. Usually rock rather than pure pop bands, when people wanted what they would at the time call "Queen blocks" - huge vertical cliffs of vocals, from as low to as high as anyone could reach. I ...


10

Just about everyone can manage an octave from B♭ to the one above. Women and men will find their own octave. Take it up to C if you like. By D some will begin to fall out, but this should be compensated by the louder tone of those who CAN get up there! Having said that, crowds enjoy 'going for the high note' in some types of song. Keep 'All things bright ...


10

You won't be singing in C3 or C2, as those are specific notes. What you mean is singing a tune an octave lower, or even higher, than where it's written, or normally sung. No, it's not out of tune, as the notes you sing will be the same name notes as original, just in a different octave. If you listen to people in a crowd singing 'in unison', usually the ...


9

The "what note" question has at least two different dimensions to it: absolute and relative pitch. For simply singing the same notes you're hearing, you don't need to know either of these. What absolute note am I hearing You need to know the absolute named pitch in the following situations: If you need to play the exact same note or accompanying ...


9

Human speech (including dialogue in movies) has a certain pitch. Well, this is true MOST of the time. As counterexamples, whispers wouldn't have defined pitch, and neither would certain other ways to vocalize dialogue (vocal fry in a delivery tends to obscure the fundamental, for example). Breathing sounds like sighs don't have strong observable ...


9

Premise: I'm italian, and I am really fanatic about our language pronunciation and writing, including their meaning, context and history, especially when related to music. Now, the keyword here is elision, even if this often happens as a similar aspect, apocope. The elision is when an unstressed vowel (or syllable) is omitted at the end of a word when the ...


8

Have to say that most, if not all of the singers I've played and worked with over the years (including myself) had no formal training at all - and some were extremely good. Main reason - there were maybe some teachers available, but certainly nothing on the net (no net, even!). And, just because it's on the net doesn't mean it's any good, be well aware of ...


8

Imagine being completely deaf, not being able to hear what sounds you produce. With a well-tuned guitar, or piano, you'd still be able to bang out a tune, knowing which notes constitute it. But try singing that tune. Doubtful it'll be successful. Main reason is that there are certain places where the notes live on guitar (as in OP), whereas with vox, the ...


8

First of all, the question is about improvisation (or composing, which is very slow improvisation), deciding what notes to produce. If someone has already made all the decisions and written down the notes, then scales are irrelevant, except maybe from an instrument-technical fingering perspective. There are two main styles or approaches to improvisation: (1) ...


8

Keep in mind: I am not a vocal coach. Although I believe strongly that what I have written is true, I don't have references for this. This may not all be technically, historically, or anatomically accurate, so take what I say with a grain of salt - especially if you're trying to learn this. Get an instructor or risk permanently damaging your voice. After ...


7

Keep straining only if you want no decent voice - ever! At your age and stage of development, it's gently gently. My baby's learned to walk - time to teach him how to jump over hurdles. Absolutely not. It may just be that you have a low voice with a low range. Nothing wrong with that. Except we all yearn for something we don't have. It's called being human. ...


7

Call and response or antiphony means some kind of trading of musical statements back and forth between players or ensembles. But when you mention repetition of lyrics you probably should also know the term refrain which is a stanza or line of poetry (lyrics) repeated, like the title in the song The Times They Are A-Changin. Call and response in most cases ...


7

You may absolutely use a spare guitar amplifier as your personal vocal monitor. Set the amp up clean (no Gain higher than 2, and the Bass, Middle, and Treble at 12 o'clock at first) and run the mono cable from your Mix Out (or Monitor Out, depending upon the PA head) jack of the stage PA to the Instrument Input of that amp. Keep the amp tilted back and ...


7

Yes but... My covers band did exactly this for a year or so, until I could afford a couple of reasonable monitors. It certainly works, but there are issues. The most obvious problem is that a guitar amp takes an unbalanced input. Balanced cables and inputs are the only practical way to get the relatively small audio signals over relatively long distances ...


7

Standard score order is that solo voice(s) are placed above the choral (or, in this case, backup) voices. By that standard, the lead vocals would be on the top staff, and the backup vocals would be on one or more staves below that. It would be your choice whether to combine two or more of the backup voices on a single staff (e.g., one staff for high voices; ...


6

Like with all skills, if you keep practicing and doing something, it will get better or at least stay the same, until things like old age or other factors start to interfere. Conversely, skills naturally deteriorate when they are neglected, but even then, a little practice can often bring things back up to a good level. I don't think that singing and playing ...


6

These terms did not designate vocal ranges; rather, they designated relationships between the various parts. Voice-parts. The following designations of voice-parts are found in MSS. [manuscripts]: Cantus, discantus, superius, triplex, medius, altus, contratenor, tenor, bassus, quintus, sextus. These should not be taken to be descriptive of the character of ...


6

Instructions, text only Choose your instrument You need an instrument with multiple channels. For example, violin has three channels assigned to it: one for each of arco, pizzicato, and tremolo. To do this, right-click on an empty place in the first measure of the score. select Staff/Part Properties... click on the Change Instrument... button select, for ...


6

A musician who plays from notation probably doesn't NEED to understand scales, though practising them can be very useful for achieving dexterity and recognising the patterns that occur in what he's reading. Some singers may not read, but they generally learn songs by imitation, which comes down to much the same thing. But guitar seems to have attracted a ...


6

Playing a musical instrument is a physical skill which needs to be learned like any other physical skill. If you don't play a musical instrument of any kind then the physical skill to play a particular instrument will be completely new. You will have to learn from scratch. To that end playing scales is a useful repetitive exercise which gives you basic ...


6

Scales have very much to do with finger patterns-- accidentals in piano, fret patterns in guitar. A singer doesn't need any of that-- they just need to know what sound they want to create.


6

Oddly enough, I was reading an analysis of this a couple of weeks ago: Finding The Best Keys For Congregational Songs.  (That page is for worship leaders and analyses lots of popular worship songs; but I think the principle applies equally to most sorts of contemporary singing.) Its conclusion is that the average singer's basic range is the octave-and-a-...


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