Hot answers tagged

33

You could be not reaching those high notes for any of these reasons: You are young and your voice is still developing your vocal technique is bad you're doing the wrong exercises and over-straining your voice you have a naturally low voice, and you'll never hit those notes Only a qualified voice teacher will be able to tell you which of these is the case, ...


29

You are never too old to sing in general. If you want to sing very demanding technical pieces such as opera or if you wish to sing professionally, there may be a time limit but at 28 you are nowhere near that. There's an African saying If you can talk you can sing, if you can walk you can dance You didn't mention what type of music you want to sing, but ...


15

Theoretically yes. Most probably, no. As with many other things, a teacher is not absolutely fundamental, but a professional guidance ensures that: you follow an appropriate didactic path tailored on you, your needs and capabilities, focusing on improving your gaps and enhancing your strengths; you don't lose time with unnecessary or even wrong suggestions ...


14

This vocal style comes from the American traditions of close harmony. As popular music (and the radio) came into being in the 20th century, it took influence from the styles of its times, just as any emerging style of music does. Looking back even further, the roots of this vocal style can be traced back to the 1800s and are likely also traceable to African ...


13

Not everyone can be a good singer but it has little to do with age Even the best singers start to lose their voices when they reach their 70s and 80s. At 28 you are nowhere near that. It is not too late to try. However people are born with their anatomy and the anatomy of head, throat and chest make a voice beautiful or not. Just as people are born to be a ...


12

I guess this is the intended range for the exercises. I.e. the first exercise top note is c, so they suggest to transpose it up in half-tone steps by up to a perfect fifth, when that note becomes g, as noted in the circle. Please note this is a suggestion from the author and you should adjust it to your own voice range.


11

Perhaps because singers are more likely not to have learned scales in such a formal way as guitarists, i.e. the names, the intervals between the notes etc. The fretboard on a guitar lays out a series of semitones for each string. A student guitarist will most likely learn at least some scales appropriate for the type of music they are learning. The voice has ...


10

Any vocal work can only be fully appreciated by listening to it in the original language, whether that language is German (Schubert's "Winterreise", or any Wagner or Strauss opera) or Italian (Puccini, Verdi etc.), because a translation nearly always loses some of the detail of the original. In extreme cases the whole meaning can be lost, ...


10

To be realistic, different people have different ranges. If everyone had the range of Mariah Carey or Axel Rose they would use it. However Taylor Swift only has just over 2 octaves and she has managed quite well. As others have said; don't strain but remember that falsetto or even whistle registers might be available to you. This is a way of getting extra ...


10

The "what note" question has at least two different dimensions to it: absolute and relative pitch. For simply singing the same notes you're hearing, you don't need to know either of these. What absolute note am I hearing You need to know the absolute named pitch in the following situations: If you need to play the exact same note or accompanying ...


9

Human speech (including dialogue in movies) has a certain pitch. Well, this is true MOST of the time. As counterexamples, whispers wouldn't have defined pitch, and neither would certain other ways to vocalize dialogue (vocal fry in a delivery tends to obscure the fundamental, for example). Breathing sounds like sighs don't have strong observable ...


8

Very short answer: you can sing at any time you want. You may not sound like Elvis Presley, but you can do it. Another very short answer: you can always start anything. You may not want, or you may not be able to reach the desired result in the time you have, with the resources you allocate (e.g. time is a very important resource), but starting and giving a ...


8

Have to say that most, if not all of the singers I've played and worked with over the years (including myself) had no formal training at all - and some were extremely good. Main reason - there were maybe some teachers available, but certainly nothing on the net (no net, even!). And, just because it's on the net doesn't mean it's any good, be well aware of ...


8

Imagine being completely deaf, not being able to hear what sounds you produce. With a well-tuned guitar, or piano, you'd still be able to bang out a tune, knowing which notes constitute it. But try singing that tune. Doubtful it'll be successful. Main reason is that there are certain places where the notes live on guitar (as in OP), whereas with vox, the ...


8

First of all, the question is about improvisation (or composing, which is very slow improvisation), deciding what notes to produce. If someone has already made all the decisions and written down the notes, then scales are irrelevant, except maybe from an instrument-technical fingering perspective. There are two main styles or approaches to improvisation: (1) ...


7

There can never be one key that a singer is happy in for every song they sing. That's simply because each song, in whatever key, has its own range - between the lowest and highest notes in that particular song.And just because D works for you for a lot certainly doesn't mean 'that's the key I sing in'. I've heard too many singers say that. It will certainly ...


7

What you're looking for is called direct monitoring. There are several options: Maybe you can turn on direct monitoring in your recording program. This is sometimes also called input monitoring or software monitoring This might be useful if you want to hear your voice with software effects like reverb and compression. The main limitation is your system ...


7

Keep straining only if you want no decent voice - ever! At your age and stage of development, it's gently gently. My baby's learned to walk - time to teach him how to jump over hurdles. Absolutely not. It may just be that you have a low voice with a low range. Nothing wrong with that. Except we all yearn for something we don't have. It's called being human. ...


7

Call and response or antiphony means some kind of trading of musical statements back and forth between players or ensembles. But when you mention repetition of lyrics you probably should also know the term refrain which is a stanza or line of poetry (lyrics) repeated, like the title in the song The Times They Are A-Changin. Call and response in most cases ...


6

There’s a complex relation between resonance rooms and vowels: Good singers have to learn to control and refine their vocal sound on a completely new level. They must learn to use the enormous potential of resonance with a new process in a targeted manner in order to produce volume in a relaxed manner and to articulate it optimally. In addition, they get ...


6

Like with all skills, if you keep practicing and doing something, it will get better or at least stay the same, until things like old age or other factors start to interfere. Conversely, skills naturally deteriorate when they are neglected, but even then, a little practice can often bring things back up to a good level. I don't think that singing and playing ...


6

These terms did not designate vocal ranges; rather, they designated relationships between the various parts. Voice-parts. The following designations of voice-parts are found in MSS. [manuscripts]: Cantus, discantus, superius, triplex, medius, altus, contratenor, tenor, bassus, quintus, sextus. These should not be taken to be descriptive of the character of ...


6

Instructions, text only Choose your instrument You need an instrument with multiple channels. For example, violin has three channels assigned to it: one for each of arco, pizzicato, and tremolo. To do this, right-click on an empty place in the first measure of the score. select Staff/Part Properties... click on the Change Instrument... button select, for ...


6

A musician who plays from notation probably doesn't NEED to understand scales, though practising them can be very useful for achieving dexterity and recognising the patterns that occur in what he's reading. Some singers may not read, but they generally learn songs by imitation, which comes down to much the same thing. But guitar seems to have attracted a ...


6

Playing a musical instrument is a physical skill which needs to be learned like any other physical skill. If you don't play a musical instrument of any kind then the physical skill to play a particular instrument will be completely new. You will have to learn from scratch. To that end playing scales is a useful repetitive exercise which gives you basic ...


6

Scales have very much to do with finger patterns-- accidentals in piano, fret patterns in guitar. A singer doesn't need any of that-- they just need to know what sound they want to create.


5

To add to some already good answers, one reason it can be so worthwhile to know the original language is to fully appreciate the text–music relationships that the composer set. There's a technique known as text painting (or word painting) where a composer makes a musical reference to the text being sung. Perhaps there's a chilly wind that passes the ...


5

In the case where an instrumentalist doubles their own improvisation with voice, there is not a specific term. Slam Stewart made his name doubling his bass in this way, having gotten the idea from Ray Perry, who did the same in his violin solos (recording not readily available). In general, it's considered something of a novelty. Some musicians famously ...


5

(Church) organists try to choose a key that the massed untrained voices of a congregation can manage without effort. A would-be 'proper' singer may well find it easier to use a range that can be crooned into a microphone without really 'turning the engine on'. They might be obsessed with reaching the highest note of a song easily, brushing aside the ...


5

Of course you could copy the track and add distortion to the copy and now you have a distorted copy. Personally I would not use the words "crisp" and "clear" to describe vocals that have any distortion on them. As with most things, the best way to get a great vocal mix is to start with a great vocal recording. When pro tracks have clarity ...


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