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I think these four different categories are not vocal types but vocal techniques. Every category includes exercises to practice every technique. These four categories might still be one way to categorize singers. Because there seems to be no scientific consensus on categorizing singers or singing techniques, this categorization may or may not be better than ...


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1) You will have more than one passaggi. The orientation of those passaggi will determine your fach, ultimately. 2) Physically speaking, you're still not 100% developed. If you're serious about becoming a classically trained, bel canto singer, you should be concentrating on developing your technique. I recommend reading a bit of Richard Miller ($20 tops), ...


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I found this article if someone is able to find the full text: Weight, Loss, and Opera: Deborah Voigt and the Little Black Dress Bernard, Hope.The Projector; Bowling Green Vol. 10, Iss. 2, (Fall 2010): 42-50. https://search.proquest.com/openview/8fd8a590552ed8a3a36b6b5319344c91/1?pq-origsite=gscholar&cbl=2049648 To my experience, there are multiple ...


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As Todd Wilcox commented, many many things can change vocal range for a few days. Permanent changes happen much more slowly: puberty, aging a few decades, deliberately using bad technique for many months.


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E4 is the major 3rd in C. So in Bb the major 3rd would be D. All you have to do is to transpose the interval to the key you are requesting. Bb is 2 semitones lower than C so the tone you are looking for is also 2 semi tones lower than E: this is D.


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It is (unfortunately) not granted to sing great consistently, and that is only natural and logical. When you sing, the instrument is your body, which depends on your physiology, and as you know the body becomes more fragile when you grow older. You need more warm ups for sports and singing, you need to train your muscles in the gym to stay fit, you need to ...


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I agree that visualizations are the most important for a singer/actor. The voice must be kept in the "front" (or mask) by hearing it as an "ugly" voice through your inner ear. Another good way is to think about "singing from the tongue muscle" to get more air into your singing or speaking and attach the voice to your body.


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Harmonium have a temparate scale notes means they are fixed in weight, and as we no that indian classical music is based on notes as well as spaces between notes (i.e shrutis), so there are also gliding of notes,meend, ornamentation etc..and harmonium can't go to that detail..thats why for professional vocal practice, string drone(taanpura) is the best ...


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To hit the low notes, you will need to train your high notes. You will need as much support and muscle training for the lowest notes as the highest notes. Source: my experience: I am a bass and have always trained the high notes more than the low notes. Both ends of my tessitura have strengthened over the years and my vocal range has grown. It is common for ...


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Does not sound healthy to me. I have also had similar problems with my voice "rattling" etc. and have always narrowed it down to my poor singing technique. Even if I have a flu, I can make my singing better by utilizing the healthy singing technique and I have got rid of the rattling and other problems by developing my technique and weekly training. It is ...


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I agree with previous answers about vibrato being natural when the singing technique is well-developed. Note also that some people have a wider vibrato than others because of different biology and physiology of the human body. Everybody's voice is different (that is why we have different voice types and fachs) so everybody's (natural) vibrato is also ...


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Record yourself while you sing, playback and listen. Try it severally with same song and you will notice the improvement.


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For operatic singers, typical highest notes in operas are: Bass: F#4 Baritone: A4, or even G#4 for Helden baritones Tenor: C5 So, for a (professional operatic) baritone, F4 would not be a very high note, and no problem to sing it for a trained singer, although it is not in the lower range either. Operatic baritones must be able to sing at least the A4 ...


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Depends on the baritone. Professional solo baritones frequently are called on to sing F4 or even a bit higher. In choral parts, it's pretty rare to see F4 for baritone, though. In choral situations, the highest common notes for baritone are likely to be around D4 or Eb4, occasionally E4. Really, it depends on the singer. Professional singers who call ...


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F4 is about the top of the baritone range, but it shouldn't be too high for any trained singer.


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The ranges of chest and head overlap, it's called the passaggio. Now chest and head sound quite different. Within this passaggio range you can sing notes in chest (deep, resonant, bassy) or head (thinner, lighter) or a mix in-between. In fact it's possible to smoothly change the production of the note from chesty to heady and back. Skilled singers who can ...


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You can sing any particular pitch in a multitude of ways, from a soft hum to full-out operatic production! Some ways fit certain ranges - you aren't going to manage 'Old Man River' (at pitch) in falsetto! But there are overlaps, and 'mixes'.


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Think of Taylor Swift who spends long days awake making songs and meeting fans, yet she still sings to this day. Yet even Lady Gaga had trouble sleeping at times, and she still sings. It's literally dependent though good health's important even for singing, like said here.


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My experience is that you will need to be nasal to sing in the mask. The air flow (which produces the sound) will need to pass through both the mouth and the nose. For sufficient air flow (the amount of air must be huge!) you will need a lot of space inside your mouth (note that it does not mean that your jaw is opened as open as you can!). The space inside ...


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I would say she is a contralto or lyric alto. It is not inappropriate to classify singers like that even though they do not sing classical music. My voice teacher has a lot of pop singers who are lyric altos according to her. She also says that a lyric alto is generally not a recognized voice type but she has a lot of students whose voice type is exactly ...


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I have heard these ranges, concerning the passaggio, which seem to hold true very well. I am a bass and my "break" is at A below middle C, and that also makes me a bass because it is where the passaggio starts. The passaggio is a biological feature (muscles) of the human because you are born with your unique body and vocal cords. Basses/altos have their ...


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I have heard the passaggio is a biological feature of the human. That way it should not depend on external attributes such as the time of day, because you are born with your body and passaggio. I have also heard these, which seem to hold true very well: Basses/altos have their passaggio start at the note A below middle C, and end at the E above middle C. ...


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My voice teacher has advised me in many great ways with keeping the voice "in the front" or "in the mask" or "out" as you say. One important fact is that you are going to need facial muscles for keeping your voice in the front. I am not an expert on the Latin names for the muscles but the smile is one way to begin. Actually you need the muscles a bit above ...


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When I started studying music, I thought my instructor was going to teach me everything I wanted to know about music. My lessons were once a week for thirty minutes and I practiced each day to prepare for my next lesson. Things progressed nicely and I thought I was on the right track, but then I started to realize there were holes in my learning. My solution ...


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They might be consciously 'working the mic' in order to either minimise unwanted breathing sound, or in order to feature it because it sounds emotional. Or they may be gasping for breath, oblivious to the fact that the mic is picking it up. Bad mic technique, or good mic technique.


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At a lower level of singing, it's a much higher priority for most vocal instructors to teach a pupil how to sing in tune than how to test them with unaccompanied performance. Yes, acapella singing can help one get better with relative pitch, but at the level where the pupil may have difficulty staying in tune even with a piano, often acapella instruction ...


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