Hot answers tagged

7

If it is in your price range (about 130 euros for the cheapest "stage" version) consider Pianoteq. All the versions have the same basic sounds, the difference is the amount of customization you can do (and at the top end, that means about 30 parameters you can change separately for each of the 88 notes!). You can select two "piano packs" with the cheapest ...


6

I've sometimes used Addictive Keys Studio Grand. It has a jangly 'pub piano' preset you might like. Also an 'aged strings' one, and others, with the mikes in a variety of arrangements. The presets are radically different from each other. There are about 35 of them and they're very easy and enjoyable to edit. They also do a 'Modern Upright' which might suit ...


3

Unfortunately, in practice your objective works the other way round. The following applies only to NotePerformer, because I don't have any experience with Sibelius Sounds. The individual instruments are certainly realistic enough to be easily identifiable by ear, but the software doesn't simulate the full range of timbre and dynamics that a professional ...


2

Before spending money, check out SFZ libraries. I know for sure that there are many decent free or <20$ grand pianos in SFZ, so maybe some uprights too. SFZ player VST is free. And I think I saw SFZ-to-Korg converter the other day, so maybe you can load them into your gadget. Pianoteq Player has too loud hammer sound for live playing, and you can't tune ...


1

For completeness, as you're looking for 'non-perfect, characterful' sounds: the MacOS contains (somewhat ancient) Roland General MIDI samples, which include 4 different piano samples, plus a 'honky-tonk'. The library can be difficult to access: it's easiest using apps which directly play the sample to incoming MIDI, such as DLS-MIDI-Synth on the Mac App ...


1

I'm giving another vote for Pianoteq v.6 Standard Edition. It allows you to modify your piano`s sounds to the nth degree including slightly detuning the piano if desired. I'm not sure why someone stated that it can't be used live as I've been doing this for several years without complaint from the audience or my bandmates. Another advantage is a working ...


1

I personally love The Grandeur and Noire for Kontakt by Native Instruments. Incredible sampling, lots and lots of options, especially with the Particle Engine on Noire. Check out the examples on their website. In regards to below comment and my mistake in reading the question. Check out The Gentleman and The Giant for upright


1

If I understood correctly, Shreddage II is a VST instrument and Peavey Revalver is an effect. In that case, you need to create a track that has Shreddage II as an instrument, and add Peavey Revalver as an insert effect to it. An alternative would be to create an effect track with Peavey Revalver and then add this effect track to your Shreddage II track as ...


1

Create a MIDI track instead of an instrument track to hold the MIDI notes. Create multiple instrument tracks for all the instruments. Use the “Sends” section on the MIDI track to send the one set of MIDI data to multiple instruments. One advantage of this method is you retain independent mixing of the different instruments. Another way to deal with this is ...


1

In most instrument VST's like Kontakt, you can choose the input/output of the VST. If you just open multiple instruments and route them to the same midi channel, every change you'll do in this midi channel will then affect all VST's


1

It would depend on which view you're playing back. If you're in session view (with columns for each track) then you're correct, the clips are only storing the "dry" signal or midi notes, and being passed through the Instrument/VST chain when played. However, if you record your sound (with VST processing) onto the arrangement view, (with rows for each track)...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible