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6

TL;DR Extra knobs and buttons are not absolutely necessary, but then again a MIDI keyboard is not absolutely necessary either, because you can just use a mouse. But since you're buying a MIDI keyboard, you most likely want to make it easier to play virtual synthesizers, and for that purpose the extra knobs and buttons are very useful. Even something very ...


3

Unfortunately, in practice your objective works the other way round. The following applies only to NotePerformer, because I don't have any experience with Sibelius Sounds. The individual instruments are certainly realistic enough to be easily identifiable by ear, but the software doesn't simulate the full range of timbre and dynamics that a professional ...


3

The timpani one is easy: Modern timpani are tuned using foot pedals, so all you have to do is tune the drum up after striking it. It takes very little skill. The conga one is a little harder but still very typical. You can raise the pitch of a hand drum by pressing on the drum head, so to do a fall you start with the pitch raised and then let it fall after ...


3

Todd and No'am have provided general answers, so just to pick up your questions: For example, if I use pro tools for making music, can I replace and modify all the sounds that those devices produce by using a keyboard connected to pro tools? Typically yes, you have a lot of control over your sounds (within the limits of the capabilities of the devices) ...


3

Very very quick overview: Synthesizer: A device or program that takes in note and other control input via MIDI messages and/or control voltages and produces electronic sounds based on the input. Synthesizers can make almost any kind of sound you can imagine, and have a wide range of controls. The most common hardware synthesizers include a piano like ...


2

Rather more succinctly: You need sufficient controllers for the parameters of the VSTi that you need to control in real-time, actually while playing. Give us more details of how you intend to work - is this for live performance or are you always recording into a sequencer? Then we can be more helpful.


1

Create a MIDI track instead of an instrument track to hold the MIDI notes. Create multiple instrument tracks for all the instruments. Use the “Sends” section on the MIDI track to send the one set of MIDI data to multiple instruments. One advantage of this method is you retain independent mixing of the different instruments. Another way to deal with this is ...


1

In most instrument VST's like Kontakt, you can choose the input/output of the VST. If you just open multiple instruments and route them to the same midi channel, every change you'll do in this midi channel will then affect all VST's


1

It would depend on which view you're playing back. If you're in session view (with columns for each track) then you're correct, the clips are only storing the "dry" signal or midi notes, and being passed through the Instrument/VST chain when played. However, if you record your sound (with VST processing) onto the arrangement view, (with rows for each track)...


1

I have been looking into this problem and no one online came up with one extra solution which made a big difference for me: I had my USB midi keyboard plugged into the computer, and the USB audio interface (Tascam US2x2) sending sound out of the computer. The best latency I got that was stable enough was about 8ms while playing a virtual synth in Reaper, ...


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