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22

Warming up means an initial period as you start a playing session where you prepare yourself to play at the highest level you can. It doesn’t always mean physically, although that’s one aspect. There are some times warming up is very important, some times it is less important, and some times I barely even bother. It all depends on you, your instrument, and ...


12

I don't know. But I'll tell you, I once heard a radio interview (it was on NPR, IIRC -- if anybody can find me this thing, I'd be grateful because I want to hear it again) with a sports medicine doctor who had changed his focus to work on musicians (instrumentalists). The interviewer asked him. How are musicians like athletes? to which he replied, and ...


7

I usually warm-up with a slow-blues I found in a magazine years ago. Here's a video. Can't really notate more, because it's never the same after this. It's pretty easy to change the drone to A for the second verse and then pop a B7 and do a lick to turn it around. It's really hard to make your fingers slow down for this. But it really sounds nice slow and ...


5

Many musicians have a warm-up routine that they go through before practicing or performing on their instrument. This can include any number of technical exercises, physical exercise (Famed Swedish madman trombonist Christian Lindberg integrates yoga and running into his daily routine) and meditation. Intuitively, you can think of this as causing all of the ...


4

My favourite one because it really helps to warm up fingers. Play the first bar and then simply go one string down. Do this until you reach the last string.


4

I'd do dynamics practice. Hold your hand out straight in front of you, and start the choir singing a chord or a single pitch in octaves. Then move your hand up and down; the choir must then get louder and softer to match the height. Get silly: bend down and put it right over the floor, and then jump up, waving it over your head. It's a good practice, and ...


4

Many musicians use a warmup routine that is learned off by heart. They can tell when something feels wrong, but more importantly, it can be used as a very simple way to become ready and get into the groove or flow. Physically it's the same principle as going to the gym for a workout. If you don't warm up first, you may find your joints are stiff, your ...


3

Strange as it may sound, it's breathing exercises that will improve pitch.By the time you think,'oh I'm a little flat' the next note has come along anyway, so thinking about pitching your voice isn't going to help. Think about your stomach (diaphragm) and mouth, and forget about your larynx. Take a good breath, thinking only about your stomach moving down ...


3

Why is warming up usually recommended? To play them well, all instruments (including the voice) require musicians to use their muscles, tendons and nerves in ways not normally used in everyday life. Because that's so, most musicians, unless they are unusually facile or always ready to play because they play so much (John Coltrane reputedly was almost ...


3

The voice parts are designed to overlap but be distinct. You won't find a spot where everyone will be perfectly comfortable - the objective of warmups is to stretch everyone to expand every part's range. If you want to focus on particular keys, exercise the parts in pairs (bass/alto, tenor/soprano). Remember that the focus of warmups is not to sound pretty ...


3

Caveat: My answer is anecdotal, and I am not a professional musician. Nor have I had any significant professional training in music performance. I play the piano in our Sunday morning church service, but I'm not that great a pianist. I use a combination of sight reading, playing by ear, memorization, and knowledge of music theory to create something that ...


2

I usually warm up playing scales. Sometimes I play a single major scale form in a cycle of fifths. Other times I will just play through major and pentatonic scale forms in one key up and down the neck. Then I usually just noodle around on some phrase or song with which I'm familiar. Caveat: I'm an amateur and have no sound reason for why this is good. It ...


2

Thats my warmups (first similar to Craig Curtis's). But they're little harder, and can be used also as an exercise, not only as warmup. Second one is about right-hand picking, and holding barre-chords.


2

This is a good warm-up exercise to improve your finger dexterity on one string. The jumps from the 4th finger to your 1st are particularly tough. Follow the fingering guide above: 1 2 3 2 3 4 1 2 3 2 3 4 E|--1-2-3-2-3-4-|-3-4-5-4-5-6-| ...


2

Beginner here, I also warm up with blues, I am not sure about how to name what I play but it looks like that (I copied the notes from a 12 bar progression): E|---------------- B|---------------- G|---------25---47 D|----25-26---48-- A|--26--2----4---- E|-3-------------- I do it because my left hand needs to move vertically and ...


2

Ideally when warming up with a large ensemble, it shouldn't be your first warmup of the day - regardless of what instrument you play. Take a half-hour or so a few hours before your rehearsal and do a nice, solid warmup. When you meet the group for rehearsal, you'll just need a minute or so to get things moving again. For that, you could pat rudiments on ...


2

Warming up helps us reach peak physical performance while minimizing the chance of injury. Typically, the best warm-ups feature the same kind of activity that you’re preparing for, just with lower intensity. This gets your muscles and other soft tissue ready for action without straining or tiring yourself. The best practice according to current sports ...


2

Honestly, it depends on the instrument. I played sax for a while; a warming up was a must, but my main squeeze is guitar. I don't usually do any thorough warm up for playing the geet. If you are getting ready for a performance, I'd recommend not going out there cold!


2

As a brass player, 'warming up' is partly a literal description - until the instrument is at the temperature of your breath, it won't be in tune! Beyond that, some players seem able to jump straight in to performance mode, others benefit from some 'limbering up' exercises. Personally, I play a few phrases after which I can either say 'that's fine!' and ...


1

Warming up seems to be an individual thing. Some like to warm up before the performance, others design their set list to begin with easier pieces and warm up while actually performing, but either way most will agree the performance feels more comfortable and flows more naturally after they've warmed up. For singers, it helps clear out phlegm and stretches ...


1

You are right. Typically these are just major or minor scales, moving up by a semitone each time. But you can use anything that is relevant for the singer - sometimes you may want wider intervals to help them warm up over fifths or octaves for example.


1

I don't think you need to warm-up your finger for a daily practice, as you practice is a warm-up and training. If you have to study passagges, you are litterally warming-up your finger at the beginning. I would suggest even to try the difficult passages for you at the beginning of your practising, before any movement on the keyboard. If you don't have any ...


1

This does not sound like "warmup" but rather like pre-stress. The purpose of warmup generally is to align your reflexes to the realities of today's state of voice and atmosphere and give an additional loosening up. However, the durations you are talking about here would seem excessive for that. It rather sounds like your "warmup" is for getting your vocal ...


1

The primary purpose of warming up is indicated by the term "warm" up. Whether warming up for sports activity or singing - it literally means raising the core temperature of the muscles you plan to use in order to increase the efficiency of the muscles and reduce the likelihood of injury. As it relates to singing, a warm up routine will also serve to ...


1

Warmups, among other things, help increase the flexibility of your vocal cords. Singing too quietly won't properly warm them up, and singing too loudly can damage them. Your instinct to start a bit quieter and gradually increase the volume is probably a good one - it mimics any other kind of physical stretch. That said, you should seldom be belting in a ...


1

I am not familiar with your condition but here are a few thoughts: I would not focus on warming up exclusively one or two fingers at a time because you may end up focusing on them to the point of tensing up Hanon exercises are good, probably better than scales which would not exercise your 5th finger that much: each exercise focuses on a specific succession/...


1

The aspects of warm up is different for different types of instruments, but it is important in various degree for most instruments in some way. Warming up the instrument Some instruments need to be in same temperature and moisture as the surroundings to stay in tune (important for string instruments). The "warm-up" (or "cool-down") for this would just be ...


1

I am a guitarist and vocalist. My experiece is .. For vocals, I find I need 3 or 4 songs of medium kind of pitch (for me) to warm my voice up. It seems to clear any mucous (bleah- sorry) and get the right muscles all pepped up properly. After that I can go for it a bit and hit higher notes much more easily. There are also specific warm-up excercises that ...


1

I use arpeggios: major 7, minor 7, and dominant 7 in 5 positions (essentially CAGED). Go through the circle of fifths, playing major 7ths in one of the 5 positions; repeat for other positions; repeat for minor 7 and dominant 7. Practice with a metronome, and gradually increase speed (over weeks/months/years). At the moment, I'm also working on tremolo ...


1

In addition to the examples shown here, I would advise you to warmup without the guitar, stretching your hands, wrist and shoulders, but also and in my opinion more importantly, to warm DOWN after a big session of playing. I used to hurt myself when I was a beginner, as my left wrist would go from "inside" flexion during hours to a sudden outside flexion. ...


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