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6

Often when a jack socket comes loose, the owner keeps tightening it from outside. This makes the wire attached to the part of the socket which is either inside the guitar body, or under the scratchplate, to turn round. It will only go so far before it either breaks or shorts or touches another component. Sounds like you need to get at the inside part of that ...


6

Bob. I changed the switching on my Tele a couple of years ago, using a propriety 4 way switch. This gives the original switching, plus the pups out of phase. It was a bit of a fiddly job, with an almost complete re-wire, but well worth it to have an extra sound. The new switch fits in place of the original, and looking at it, you wouldn't know. Obviously, ...


6

Your wiring description is not all that clear. I suggest you find a suitable wiring diagram (example here), and make sure your wiring matches. I would then use a continuity tester to check your solder connections are good. You should also continuity check that you have not shorted your live connection to ground.


5

As so often in music, it's up to your taste. A bigger cap for the bass-cut might make sense, but preferrably use a properly designed modern circuit instead of that ancient junkvintage one. Guitar tone controls are a very crude means of affecting the signal. The treble cut does multiple things over the range of the pot: At the “high” end of the pot, the ...


4

This is not symptomatic of a ground loop. Noise from ground loops would not stop when you touch the strings. It sounds like you have bad ground on the guitar, which is totally different from a ground loop. Ideally you should have 0 ohms resistance. A slight variation is ok. 30 ohms... you have to evaluate what is going on there. If you get that reading ...


4

Important note: You can't connect both amps to that cab without blowing something up. You need two cabinets. There are some cabinets that support bi-amping, which is using two amps with one cabinet. Your cabinet does not. Your cabinet has two 1/4" inputs wired together in parallel so you can daisy-chain additional cabinets. Yes you can drive both power ...


4

On a cheaper Fender guitar, it's incredibly unlikely that you have a TRS connection from the Fishman pickup. You're just going to have a standard 1/4" mono cable (TS - but rarely called that). Buy a 10ft 1/4" Mono instrument cable. Connect it to the DI box you have, and let the sound engineer earn his money by using a standard XLR cable to connect your DI ...


4

Your sound engy is hacking the guitar's connection to the mixer. To what end, I can't say, but I can say that the change in cable is significant and is the primary reason for your woes. Acoustic-electric guitars have a battery-powered preamp. To avoid that battery being constantly connected to the preamp, draining the battey when you're not using the guitar,...


4

I would say your best guess is probably correct: dead preamp. Which is strange because a properly made solid-state preamp should easily work without flaw for many decades, but that doesn't mean they all do. Be prepared that you'll have to replace it. However since this has both active PUs and a preamp, it's definitely worth making sure the PUs aren't ...


4

With the assumption that you have tested all positions of volume and tone knobs and selector switches, that leaves only two likely causes: The most likely is a damaged wire, worn selector switch or a bad solder joint - which is leaving a very poor connection or no connection. You should check all wiring and solder joints. It's useful to have the guitar ...


3

There is no significant difference between two unbalanced mono connections and a single stereo connection. However, with two mono lines you have the option of making both balanced, which is usually a good idea for longer connections. With single-cable stereo, this is typically not possible because suitable 5-lead connectors aren't available (at least not ...


3

With a full 4-pole switch, it's easy to figure out a routing – just assign each of the wires coming out of the PU a pole. Then for each setting of the knob, you can freely decide where the signal should go. You'll definitely want the standard serial wiring (i.e. opposite coil polarities in series, so the opposite magnets will bring the signals in phase) ...


3

If you are getting zero ohms across the bridge pickup then that's your problem: there is a short circuit somewhere. Your testing indicates it isn't in the pickup, as you still get an appropriate resistance across it when not installed, so the most likely causes are: a short you caused when soldering: check for accidental shorts between adjacent wires and ...


3

Practical? Absolutely. Beneficial? I would say so! I recently rewired a Tele of mine, from a three-pickup "Nashville" style to the classic two-pickup, but with some tricks under the hood: A four-way pickup selector switch, offering bridge and neck pickups either individually, combined in parallel (as is standard) or combined in series; and A push-push ...


3

Normally all of the following are earthed (soldered to the casing of the volume pot) The outer ring of the jack socket (that's your main earth to the amplifier) The strings (via a wire to the tailpiece or bridge) - this usually reduces interference picked up by the strings The anti-clockwise tab of the volume pot (this little wire is essential for the ...


3

note: I've had to change my answer, thanks to a comment pointing out what's happening. TRS-XLR cables often don't work for connecting a guitar to a balanced circuit. The TS connector in the guitar does not have a ring contact, which means pin 3 on the XLR floats. The preamp on the mixer input works by measuring the difference between pin 2 and 3. If pin 3 ...


2

If you ignore the four conductor circuit diagram and treat the pickup as a single coil, I'm sure it will work fine. Try looking at the Gibson example on Wikipedia's guitar wiring article, with the one humbucker wired to a volume and tone pot. (Note this diagram is more complicated than you need. You need to look at just one pickup and its volume control.) ...


2

You don't need balanced cables for this. You can use two standard instrument cables (electric guitar cables) and go from the 1/4" out left and right into the 1/4" input on the monitors. Make sure you are connecting from the Output jacks on the keyboard and not the input jacks. (I've made this mistake before. Hard to read the raised black letters...) The ...


2

Do a cost/benefit analysis starting with the actual costs. So the cost of a new G400 (or the ESP from a quick search) is about $400, right? So now you need to find out how much it will cost to fix your current guitar. See if you can take it in for a quote. It might be a simple as doing a setup, but it could also be something like the frets or the nut. If ...


2

When you removed the screws, there should have been a ground strap attached to the claw that the springs connect to, or possibly to the tremelo itself. If this is still attached then look at where the other end is connected - usually the ground plane or one of the pots. It may have come loose when you removed the trem.


2

Looking over the diagram, it does work how you imagine, switching wise. I have a guitar set up similarly. One thing to note here is that when you have the pickups parallel with each other, and separate volume knobs for each pickup, there is a path to ground through each of the volume knobs for the connected pickups (neck/middle pair, etc). Because of this, ...


2

First, you have to get a schematic for that type of guitar (you say it is a Alexi laiho 200, LTD.) Research the internet for that make and model of guitar. Once you get it, start tracing out different parts of the circuit, highlighting the schematic as you go, if you find an error then, desolder and resolder (yes, you need to know how to solder!) the ...


2

If you keep the speakers in series to get 16 ohms, that would match the output impedance of an amp with 16 ohm output. Electrically, this should be just fine. You can go higher ohms without hurting anything (8 to 16 ohms). Oh, EDIT: If the common of both jacks are on the same plate, that might create problems, depending on the amp(s). So best to insulate ...


2

Yes, it's very feasible. Some considerations. *In series, two 8 Ohm speakers will have an impedance of 16 Ohms. In parallel, two will be 4 Ohms. *Plastic sockets on a plastic plate will be less problematic than metal sockets on a metal plate. *May be better to split the cab vertically - just a thought. *With two different amps, therefore sounds, it ...


2

This kind of problem is really hard to troubleshoot remotely but usually fairly straightforward to troubleshoot in person. Usually, the most effective approach is process of elimination. The exact method you use will depend on how familiar you (or your tech) are with electronics and different troubleshooting methods. Generally, to be thorough, it's probably ...


1

Your guitar can definitely get that modern sound. A lot of the tone is the pickups, with the other major parts being the amplifier and cabinet. The guitar design and woods, while having an influence on the tone, are probably the smallest part of the equation. I'd suggest trying out some passive pickups that players you like are using. It sounds like the ...


1

The circuit you are describing is not specifically doable with a regular 5 way switch and regular potentiometers, as far as I can see. It is possible with a super switch or something that's able to make multiple separate poles of connection at each point, but another big problem to solve is the separate volumes for (bridge) and (middle + neck) without mixing ...


1

I found the issue was 2 different things, The first being as mentioned in a comment there was just a little bit too much solder connecting the volume knob, the second was I had no ground wire going to my input jack as the schematic I went off of didn't show one which seemed strange but I followed it. She sings now though, and looks and sounds spectacular. ...


1

The manual is confusing. It speaks of 'phone plugs'. The stereo output actually appears to be a pair of 1/4" jacks. It is unclear whether they are TS (unbalanced) or TRS (balanced). The Yamaha HS50M has a matching jack input. I suggest you use it. It probably is balanced, but it really doesn't matter. Use a pair of ordinary 1/4" jack cables. TS will ...


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