19

Musical instruments are classified by the way the sound is produced. The material is immaterial and brass and woodwind instruments can both be made from metal, plastic or wood. Woodwind instruments are those where you blow across an opening (flute), or use a single reed (sax, clarinet), or double reed (oboe, bassoon). I think pipe organs are in this class ...


17

NO, writing a tenor-recorder part for an oboist would be about as helpful as me giving you a sandwich to breath underwater. Each instrument responds very differently throughout their range, and while the core fingering principles may be similar (as with saxophone, flute, clarinet, and bassoon as well), each instrument has its own nuances. Fingering wise, ...


11

As has been said so many times - get a good teacher - at least for a while. I believe anyone can learn to play an instrument by themselves - if they live long enough !! A teacher will guide you to a suitable sax, be it soprano, alto tenor or baritone (quite expensive). Watching videos and using tutor books is good, but they won't answer a question you ...


11

On the assumption that if you added up the note values in the bar concerned, and they added up correctly WITHOUT the 'little notes', they will probably be grace notes. They have no value of their own, and are played sort of crushed in just before the main note that follows. You should not blow separately, but play the little note almost like it was a mistake,...


10

All instruments are equally difficult for different reasons. You can't escape by choosing an "easy" instrument because there are none. All pitches from all instruments have overtones. It is impossible not to use an overtone as they are inherent in the physical properties of vibration that actuate the pitch. It is precisely the reliance on the ear to ...


10

In this admittedly limited study, they record one oboist using more than double (over 110 cm H2O) the blowing pressure to play fortissimo compared to two different clarinetists (both around 50 cm H2O), also playing fortissimo. The other oboist in the study blew a peak pressure of about 80 cm H2O for fortissimo playing. A better graphical comparison is ...


10

Every wind instrument has a theoretically infinite range, which is only limited by the player's skill. The first octave is the fundamental, and then all higher notes are played as overtones of that first octave. The second octave is by far the most stable, it's just the entire first octave again but on the second harmonic. The third octave could ...


8

Well, "non-reed" eliminates most of the woodwind family, leaving only the flute family. Recorder is pretty easy. There's a reason it's the instrument of choice for elementary school music programs. It takes zero embouchure (mouth position/strength) and almost no air support--you pretty much just blow into it gently and it works. Other recorder-like ...


8

To answer part of your question, concerning why keyed brass instruments don't work out: The "puckered lips" which produce the note in a brass instrument create a sound pressure wave which is very nearly a square wave. By comparison, a flute produces close to a sine wave, and clarinet/sax a sort of triangle wave. Now, what the keys/holes in a woodwind do ...


8

This has been done, at least as an experiment. There's a paper Artificial buzzing lips and brass instruments: Experimental results (pdf download link) in the Journal of the Acoustical Society of America describing how they did this for a trombone mouthpiece. Mechanical saxophone embouchures have been done before as well. Here's one playing John Coltrane's ...


7

Absolutely. JB Arban once said that people have the wrong idea about embouchure - that it's a fixed thing like a statue. He said that embouchure is fluid - you need to do what's right and what sounds good. I am not surprised that you have difficulties with flute after trombone; remember how each instrument works: The flute is like a fickle bottle - you ...


7

Speaking purely from personal experience, braces are an annoyance but not a problem. I played the clarinet thru 3 years' worth of old-fashioned metal-band&wire braces, with some lip shredding, some applications of dental wax, and so on. Abrasion on internal (mouth) surfaces is likely with any instrument. In the woodwind family, since only single-...


7

The usual situation, if there is more than one part for the same instrument in a piece, is that the instruments do not play the same note. Such parts can be, and usually are, notated on the same staff in an orchestral score. Each such staff can be extracted into a single part or into multiple parts, as described by MattPutnam. Having a separate part for ...


6

Tips on proper flute embouchure: Aperture (space between your lips) should look like a flat football. Use a mirror! Think of whistling = corners of mouth together and open aperture, then bring corners back and down (like a frown.) Lips should be smooth so air stream can be smooth. Aim air stream for edge on the far side of the opening (that's where the air ...


6

From the perspective of a music educator: the flute would be much easier to learn proper embouchure fundamentals on, as, with the lower pitch, it's more more forgiving. During my college days, I picked up the flute quite quickly, but I had a difficult time achieving a good tone on the piccolo. That said, it would not be impossible to learn on it's own, just ...


6

I play both the flute and piccolo, so my answer is completely based off of personal experience. In my opinion, the piccolo and flute are completely different. The only thing that's similar about the two is fingering. I suggest memorizing the piccolo fingering if you just want to play piccolo, since the piccolo does not have some of the keys that a flute ...


6

This is from a long time flute player. 40+ years. On a flute the 'open' note is 2nd octave C# which is a horrible note to tune on due to some compromises that were made in the original design of the Boehm system flute. The c# key is the tiny one at the top its that way because it acts as both the C# key and the key you open to get D and Eb in the flutes ...


6

The basic answer (which applies to carbon fiber stringed instruments too) is that our current understanding of materials science is insufficient to produce a material which exhibits as "flat", i.e. uniform frequency resonance curve as wood. Keep in mind that it takes a lot of skill to select proper wood -- there's a reason reed instruments are made ...


6

Irish whistle (aka pennywhistle aka tin whistle) is not only the easiest to learn, it's also the probably the only musical instrument in the world where you can get a professional level instrument for around US$20. A great starter site for Irish whistle is Chiff and Fipple.


6

It seems there is a large recorder making community, with a vast and very useful set of resources here. There are some links to technical plans, however a lot of them are for alto recorder rather than tenor, and even more still are stored on microfiche in libraries and not accessible online. Having said that: This PDF has a graph detailing bore diameters ...


6

If you are going to play from dots, there are two options. The C xaphoon (like any C instrument) will play in the correct key for any music written for piano, guitar and such like. So if there's a piece in, say, F, you play it as writ, it comes out at concert pitch. The Bb instrument will be good if you wish to play stuff written for Bb instruments - tenor ...


6

First, be aware that there's often a difference between the conductor's score and the individual parts. To save space and make it easier to navigate, a score often has multiple parts condensed onto one staff, even if the result would be horribly complex to decipher while playing. The individual parts can be written either combined or separate, depending on ...


6

All woodwind instruments1 have a first octave, which then overblows to a second octave. Then, higher notes are possible through increasingly convoluted fingerings. So you don't have to do much to assure that the instrument will have more than one octave. Modern instruments have octave keys and other mechanisms that make this easier, but even the most basic ...


5

I have the EWI USB. As mentioned by Meaningful Username, it doesn't have any in-board sounds, so I can't play it stand-alone -- it has to be plugged in to a computer. While it does come with its own softsynth program (based on Garritan's Aria Player), and a decent set of samples, it can also be used as a generic MIDI controller, which is what I usually do. I ...


5

Even if the question has an accepted answer I would like to leave my answer to tell you about my encouraging experience with the saxophone. I never had any musical education but that didn't stop me from buying a Xaphoon In July 2006. I played the thing by ear for a few months. It was dreadful at start but the sound got better sounding after 6 months. Around ...


5

Just some supplementary comments: The effects of braces on playing vary from person to person, based on how they play, their facial structure, and how much they're willing to work to adjust to braces and then readjust after they get them off. I play the French horn and I was totally fine until I got braces in seventh grade. Now, at the tail end of my ...


5

My son plays saxophone and his band teacher is very careful about giving instructions for home practice. He hasn't said anything about risks coming from toothpaste or mouthwash. Also this sax forum stresses getting rid of the food particles but doesn't warn about damage from the cleaning substances: http://forum.saxontheweb.net/showthread.php?7159-Proper-...


5

This question has a long ,complex, and somewhat incomplete answer. All the items you mentioned matter. Trivial example, open and stopped organ pipes. An open pipe generates a fundamental wavelength equal the length of the pipe; there is a node at each end (that is, the air is still at each end.) A stopped pipe generates a fundamental with wavelength half ...


5

There are a few issues here. Let's start with notation: Many instruments are written in concert pitch. This means that, if you write a C, that instrument will play a C. The (standard) flute and timpani are concert-pitch instruments. Other instruments are pitched in a particular key; hence a B-flat Clarinet and B-flat trumpet, if playing a written C, will ...


5

You could try to remove the metal cap from the boot, open the screws and remove the metal U there. (Reassembly is easy, typically a metal PIN ensures correct orientation.) Then you can inspect whats there and since it is open it should also dry much faster. After leaving it open over the night it should at least be dry (if not clean), and no further harm ...


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