BobRodes
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How Do I Know Which Piano Hand Position in the Following Exercise?
0 votes

For what it's worth, I'd start with 2 on C. In bar 4, play the first C with 2 and the second one with 1. Then, play the E at the beginning of bar 7 with 4.

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Two sets of fingerings printed for one same bar?
1 votes

Interestingly, in Beethoven sonatas, the alternative fingerings are often his own suggestions. I used the Henle edition when I was studying them, and they put italic numbers for Beethoven's ...

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How can I notate this better in 12/8 time?
0 votes

Another alternative is to change the time signature to 3/2 for this measure, and then back to 12/8. As with Richard's suggestion of a triplet notation, it's best saved only for certain occasions.

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Ways to play piano without tensing ones fingers
3 votes

You have probably had the experience as a young child of running, stumbling, and not quite falling. Think about how much more effort it required to recover from the stumble than it did to simply run. ...

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How to memorize seventh chords and inversions on piano?
0 votes

Before you start adding in fancier chords like ninths and augmented chords, I would get familiar with basic chord progressions and what inversions work best to provide good voicing. Good voicing ...

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How to execute rapid broken chords in Beethoven Op. 90
2 votes

This is a notoriously difficult passage to play. I do much the same thing as Alexander, except I use 2 on the first F# and then switch to 3 for the next two. For me, when I do that leap, 2 is right on ...

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What does this notation mean?
Accepted answer
4 votes

To add a caveat to Tim's answer: this marking should generally be taken with a grain of salt — or more like a rather large pinch of salt — in music written prior to the 20th century. Most such ...

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What's the reason for switching fingers on these same notes?
0 votes

While in general it's a good idea to change fingers on repeated notes, the whole idea was taken to a pedantic extreme in the early 20th century. Some of the fingerings in some piano books adhere to ...

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I have been practicing a song for 3 hours straight but I keep making mistakes. How can I get it right?
12 votes

I suspect your teacher suggested that you play it at a slower tempo. When you say that it didn't really help, I would suggest that you practice it at an even slower tempo, and continue to slow it down ...

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Cross-staff conflict
1 votes

Your "how it should look" looks pretty good to me as is. But I think that your issue is trying to beam through the 16th rest at the end of bar 1. Don't do that. It's at the very least confusing; ...

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How to practice for speed and consistency
1 votes

You're simply playing it faster than you're able to. It's far and away the most common problem that pianists have when working up a piece, so you're very far from alone in this. My advice to you is ...

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Accompanist qualities?
0 votes

You can't go wrong by listening to this recording of "The Unashamed Accompanist" by the great Gerald Moore: And then, I would find his books (listed in the Wikipedia ...

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Am I notating this 2 layered staccato right?
0 votes

To take Laurence's examples, I would definitely prefer to read B. A is terrible for me, C is tolerable, B give me the easiest understanding of what's going on. Incidentally, Beethoven used this device ...

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Help with sixteenth tuplet with a 9 under
3 votes

Strictly speaking, your piece's nine "Little notes" are to fit into the space of two eighth notes, because that's what's not taken up by other notes in the measure. When you write the number like that,...

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Was Sviatoslav Richter using the pedal in his recordings for Well-Tempered Clavier?
1 votes

If you want to compare one which has very little pedal, have a listen to some of Glenn Gould's recordings. For example this one: The same fugue starts at 15:10 on the ...

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Eric Satie Gymnopédie no. 1 double played f
0 votes

If you want to go to the trouble, this is one of those times to consider using the sostenuto (middle) pedal. You have to do a couple of things to get it to work properly: Play the first measure with ...

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How to fix tension when playing octaves?
1 votes

If you're becoming tense, it's most likely that you are playing them too quickly. If you can play octaves at all, you can play octaves at some slow tempo where you are both relaxed and accurate. Start ...

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Ständchen Schubert arr. Liszt help with line
1 votes

Another technical point: the F on the left side of the line is doing double duty as part of the middle voice and part of the lower accompaniment. This creates a bit of difficulty, as you have to ...

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Correct piano wrist movement
1 votes

There are exceptions to every rule, as I guess you're finding out. If you look at Horowitz, you'll find that his wrists often dip below the key level, especially when he's doing finger passages. (...

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Earliest piano lyre?
1 votes

The short answer is that it depends on whom you ask. This wikipedia article is a very interesting read on the subject of piano pedals and their history. Here's a quote of the material most relevant to ...

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How to figure out key from key signature?
3 votes

You want a picture, you got a picture. :)

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Would this note from Consolation No. 3 be considered a nonchord tone?
1 votes

It's also worthwhile to point out that G# is part of the harmonic A minor scale, and G natural is part of the natural A minor scale. (In effect, minor keys borrow the dominant 7th chord from their ...

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Why is there an octave leap in this example from Gradus ad parnassum?
0 votes

An example of the principle that Richard describes:

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Why can't I identify major and minor chords?
14 votes

This may be helpful. Start by learning to hear the difference between major and minor thirds. Find four songs, one that begins with a rising major third, one with a rising minor third, one with a ...

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Will an accidental in piano sheet count for second voice as well?
3 votes

In piano music at least, an accidental is in effect on the line or space on which it occurs, and for the entire measure. It is not in effect for the notes an octave (or more than one octave) higher or ...

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How can I memorize all the notes in each usable key?
2 votes

This site has a lot of good information about scales, as well as diagrams of where they fall on a piano keyboard. This site is a good reference for notation, intervals, etc. The way to get faster at ...

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Does every song in a particular scale require finger to be positioned in the same way?
1 votes

What Tim says. But also, in general avoid putting your thumbs on black keys when you're doing stepwise (scale) passages. It's usually awkward. The single universal rule about fingering is to use the ...

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Difference between Minor and Diminished Intervals
0 votes

Augmented means one half step more than major or perfect, while diminished means one half step less than minor or perfect. So, a "tritone" such as C-F# is an augmented fourth, while the same thing ...

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Can a well regulated piano be incompatible with a sufficiently fast/soft song?
1 votes

Clementi was famous for his technique (octave trills in one hand, for example — how does anyone do that?), and I feel quite sure that his abilities would have outstripped the limitations of some of ...

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Weird acciaccatura (?) notation in Chopin's polonaise
3 votes

The reason for a slash in a note is not that it is a grace note per se, but that it is to be played outside the context of the meter. In other words, it's a note that you "throw in" in whatever way ...

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