BobRodes
  • Member for 7 years, 11 months
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How to learn piano without owning a piano?
1 votes

I generally won't take a student if he or she doesn't have a piano at home. I would make an exception if someone showed me a practice plan that was well laid out, but I've never seen that before. ...

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Learning piano by autodidact after getting older
1 votes

These are all good answers. I would consider all the advice given here equally: reading is important, theory is important, playing by ear is important, practice is important. Keep in mind that the ...

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Do the different Modes have different scale degrees?
1 votes

For a great explanation of modes, see “What is a Mode?” from Leonard Bernstein’s Young People’s Concerts and watch his very entertaining explanation. It's nearly 50 years old (he starts singing that ...

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Effect of illness on vocal range
1 votes

Probably due to thickening of the vocal chords due to swelling. I've often found that when I get a throat problem, my range is lower. I can't hit my highest notes and can hit lower notes than usual. ...

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Piano fingering: B flat dominant 7th arpeggio
Accepted answer
1 votes

This is one of the more difficult arpeggios for most people, because of getting the thumb under the fourth finger for a major third. Try playing F and D together with 2-1. Note your hand position. ...

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What do scale fingerings have to do with musicianship in the context of college auditions?
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Well, without hearing you play your scales I can't really say. However, if you really play all your scales at that speed (I assume you're saying you play a quarter note per beat, and you're playing ...

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Chord compatibility or something else?
1 votes

The proper term for your "compatible" is "diatonic", which means "involving only notes proper to the prevailing key without chromatic alteration." I'll expand a bit on Dom's excellent answer if I may....

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Learn musical notation
1 votes

Another answer in addition to all the other perfectly good ones: First, get a good set of flash cards. These are the ones I have always used with my students: http://www.amazon.com/Flashcards-...

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Why don't we measure the size of intervals starting from zero?
1 votes

A slightly different answer from the others is this: the issue comes up when you think of intervals in cardinal terms rather than ordinal terms. While it isn't "wrong" to do so, it isn't "wrong" to ...

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Do I play all the F's as sharp or just the one with the sharp in the space?
1 votes

Let me take a crack at explaining the circle of fifths and key signatures here as well. Every major scale has the same intervals: whole step, whole step, half step, whole step, whole step, whole ...

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How Do I Know Which Piano Hand Position in the Following Exercise?
0 votes

For what it's worth, I'd start with 2 on C. In bar 4, play the first C with 2 and the second one with 1. Then, play the E at the beginning of bar 7 with 4.

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How can I notate this better in 12/8 time?
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Another alternative is to change the time signature to 3/2 for this measure, and then back to 12/8. As with Richard's suggestion of a triplet notation, it's best saved only for certain occasions.

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How to memorize seventh chords and inversions on piano?
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Before you start adding in fancier chords like ninths and augmented chords, I would get familiar with basic chord progressions and what inversions work best to provide good voicing. Good voicing ...

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Am I notating this 2 layered staccato right?
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To take Laurence's examples, I would definitely prefer to read B. A is terrible for me, C is tolerable, B give me the easiest understanding of what's going on. Incidentally, Beethoven used this device ...

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What's the reason for switching fingers on these same notes?
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While in general it's a good idea to change fingers on repeated notes, the whole idea was taken to a pedantic extreme in the early 20th century. Some of the fingerings in some piano books adhere to ...

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Accompanist qualities?
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You can't go wrong by listening to this recording of "The Unashamed Accompanist" by the great Gerald Moore: And then, I would find his books (listed in the Wikipedia ...

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Eric Satie Gymnopédie no. 1 double played f
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If you want to go to the trouble, this is one of those times to consider using the sostenuto (middle) pedal. You have to do a couple of things to get it to work properly: Play the first measure with ...

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Why is there an octave leap in this example from Gradus ad parnassum?
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An example of the principle that Richard describes:

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Difference between Minor and Diminished Intervals
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Augmented means one half step more than major or perfect, while diminished means one half step less than minor or perfect. So, a "tritone" such as C-F# is an augmented fourth, while the same thing ...

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How to recognise polyrhythm in a piece
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A two-against-three is sometimes called a "hemiola." (Next time you see it in a trivia game, you'll know.) You can always work out polyrhythms by taking the least common multiple of the two voices, ...

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Finger stretches for adult learner
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I usually stretch my fingers before I start to play, but it isn't something to overdo. I put the pads of my fingers together, and push inwards. Hold that for a few seconds, let go, wait a few seconds ...

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Correct hand position at piano with nails
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Alfred Brendel had all kinds of trouble with this, to the extent that he took to putting strips of adhesive tape on the ends of his fingers. He once said on the Dick Cavett show that "the joke was ...

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Number appearing above two notes in tempo; how do I play/interpret this?
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To answer your first question, the metronome marking of "quarter note = 63" means 63 quarter notes per minute, or approximately one quarter note per second.

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What's the point of keys other than C and Am?
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Most people find major keys more cheerful than minor keys, but beyond that it really depends on who you ask. Beethoven believed that there were very specific correlations between moods and keys (in ...

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Using Pedal For Two Part Writing
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I'll speak even more generally to your question. It is appropriate to do anything you want if you feel that it allows you to better phrase the melody. I sight read this bit, cycling from the end to ...

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When can changing key sound good?
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It's really just like anything else in music. Some things "sound right" and others don't. Furthermore, things that "sound right" to some people sound very wrong to others. So, what's important is ...

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Is it possible to play instruments without being able to read music?
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The simple answer to your question is that some people absolutely can, although there are plenty of pros who can't. Have a look at this (great fun):

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Puzzled on this use of the double treble cleff arrangement
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To play the "too crowded" 16th notes in bars 8 and 9, hold down the pedal and play them with a sort of long staccato ("detached" is a term you will see). This will give the key in the right hand time ...

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Alternative to Cooke's Piano Fingerings for F# Major Arpeggios
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I use the same fingering for F# as I use for D, or any other arpeggio where all keys except the second note are white. I think that's the fingering you'll find in Hanon; it is the fingering I was ...

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Grace notes different to normal notes under sustain pedal
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I would personally agree with user25636, that the composer wanted all three octaves in the final note, and realizing that you can't do that, set the bottom one in a grace note. If so, it follows that ...

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