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I have a cheap acoustic steel string guitar “Rogue”. When you press the 4th fret on the 6th string (low E) to play a G♯ that is, it makes a buzzing sound. Apparently, the string touches both the 5th and the 6th fret-wires even before playing the note. A similar effect also was observed on the 5th string but not as severe. The other 4 strings have not shown this effect.

Should I turn my truss rod to the left - counter clockwise? If so how much to turn and will it correct as soon as I turn?

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Considering the fact that its the 4th fret that's buzzing, you might want to give it a bit more relief, thus turning it counterclockwise. But also check if your saddle and you nut are properly set. If the other strings don't have this problem it might be that your saddle is uneven or your nut is filed wrong. or it could be that your frets are not leveled

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It could be one or more of a variety of problems.

Simply raising the bridge (if at all possible) on the lower strings' side may solve it. Chances are, the bridge is fixed, so maybe not.

Look down the guitar from bridge to head (or the opposite way) and you may see the neck is twisted. If so, there's little to be done.

It could just be that there's not enough relief in the neck. The strings are too close. That can be alleviated by turning the truss rod anti-clockwise, thus allowing the strings to pull the neck out of its line, and giving a little more space between strings and fretwires. It's a slow job, one eighth of a turn at a time, and leave for a while to settle.

It could be that the offending fretwires aren't bedded in quite enough. Now, 4th fret seems low compared with 5th and 6th, from your description.Using a straight edge - a short rule(r) will show if 5 and 6 are too high. Gentle taps with a toffee hammer will probably sort that out.

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