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A common problem, the locking knob on my microphone stand no longer tightens. Taking it apart, a small metal 'collar' seems to have had the thread partially stripped. It's a tiny part but I've no idea if these are standard and can be replaced.

It looks like this, for scale the knob is 1" diameter:

enter image description here

This is the product link: http://www.tonedeafmusic.co.uk/products/mc01b-black-mic-stand-(large--folding-with-boom).html

  • Found this from a sidebar link on a related subject. Just to note that your product link is now a 404... but while I'm here, I'd actually seriously recommend at least doubling your mic stand budget. a 20 quid/buck stand will last a couple of years or so, a 100+ quid stand will outlive you. – Tetsujin Mar 11 '16 at 12:58
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You could try

  1. Place "nut" with flat side on a hard surface.
  2. Hit the protruding "thread" with a sharp blow with a hammer.
  3. Try locking knob thread on "nut".
  4. Repeat if required.

Alternately you could try lodging a small piece of plastic cable tie in "nut" ,simulating a Nyloc Nut,which should allow locking knob thread to grip.

.

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Can't think of anything else that will take its place. It's basically a semi-captive nut, that won't turn once the rod is inside the tube. A couple of ideas - use a bigger bolt, and tap out the meat to match it. Weld an appropriate nut to the outside, Both of which I've done in the past. As a semi-permanent you could put a pipe clip on the rod, to hold it up. Done that too! For less than £20 for a new stand, I doubt the manufacturers will replace the ailing part. If it always stays at a particular height, gaffer tape will do the job. Makes you look like a real muso, too...!

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  • Yeah, it just seems so wasteful that one washer/nut makes the whole thing 'useless'. I wonder if I could tape the thread on the bolt to make it wider and get away with that... by the time I start drilling/welding my time isn't worth it, but it still irks me! I had wondered if they used standard parts I could find in a hardware store, but don't even know what it would be called. – Mr. Boy Jul 22 '15 at 21:47

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