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I have a Scarlet 2i2, which I use to record Guitar, Bass, Vocals, and Drums. But I hate only being able to use two mics at once to record the drums. Will using the Behringer Q802USB allow me to mic the drums better? Also, if I use the mixer, what role will the 2i2 play in the recording process? I use Abelton Live btw. Basically what I am asking is whether or not the Behringer mixer would be a wise purchase for this use and if so, did I waste my money on the 2i2.

  • Oh and also, to avoid using too many tracks to record drums, can I run everything being recorded by the behringer into one of the inputs on the 2i2 to make everything being recorded from the drums on one track after I mix it on the Behringer? Thanks. – Joseph Jun 12 '16 at 17:46
  • Well, whatever you do, check Behringer mixers user reviews, from what I remember, they know to be noisy. – yo' Jul 4 '16 at 21:14
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Will using the Behringer Q802USB allow me to mic the drums better?

The Q80 has two mic inputs and preamps, so does the 2i2. This means that you can have a 3 mic setup using both inputs in the Q80, and connecting that mix to the 2i2, using its remaining input for another mic (using the Q80 as mixer and the 2i2 as interface).

You could also try a 4 mic dual interface setup (using both devices as interfaces). It's possible with some interface combinations. I've never tried though.

So, in short, yes it will allow to mic better (as in more mics), but not by much. Probably not worth it.

Also, if I use the mixer, what role will the 2i2 play in the recording process?

Same as before, the role of an interface (providing conversion and I/O).

Basically what I am asking is whether or not the Behringer mixer would be a wise purchase for this use

I don't think it's worth it. If you want to do big multitrack recordings save for a 6 (at least) channel interface with hybrid inputs (so you can connect mics, line, and instrument to any input) with preamps for each input.

Some examples: Behringer U-PHORIA UMC1820, TASCAM US-16x08, M-Audio M-Track Eight, and PreSonus AudioBox 1818VSL.

But it depends in which sound you are going for. If what you have in mind can be achieved with 4 or 3 mics, then it will be probably worth it. Some styles (jazz comes to my mind) record drums with as few as two mics! And they sound beautiful.

You can do a lot of great stuff with 2, 3, and 4 mics. The problem is that you lose flexibility with such a small setup. Some drum sounds (specially in rock) are achieved through close-miking almost every element separately.

Oh and also, to avoid using too many tracks to record drums

I don't think there's such thing as "too many tracks to record drums". You use the necessary to achieve the sound you are looking for. Two mics can be the magic number, 9 mics can be too in another scenario. Don't get fixated in "i'm using too much or too few tracks" as long as you like the sound.

can I run everything being recorded by the behringer into one of the inputs on the 2i2 to make everything being recorded from the drums on one track after I mix it on the Behringer?

The Q80 can't record, but you can use its output (whatever you are mixing through it) and connect it to whatever compatible input you want, including the 2i2.

  • Thanks! I was saying too many tracks because abelton live limits you to 8 tracks. Yeah i will definitely get a mixer with more inputs. I recorded an ep with only 2 mics on drums and it was good but not as clear as I had in mind. It worked for that EP but what I am working on now needs a little more clarity and precision with the drum mics. Thanks! – Joseph Jun 12 '16 at 22:11
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If you need more mics, I suggest you get an audio interface with more mic inputs. There are some decent options with 4 mic inputs for a decent price. If you try to use two audio interfaces at the same time... you are asking for trouble.

A second consideration is the mics... What kind of mics are you using? If you use cardiod mics, they normally have a very noticeable proximity effect. That means that it is more difficult to get a balanced/natural sound if the source is large (drum sets, piano...), so you need more mics. Then you might get more easily into phasing problems... but that's another issue.

Normally, I'd say that just a pair of omni-directional mics can give you decent results also with drums, given that the room you record in is not too bad (omnis will pick up more room). Downside is that good mics are expensive, if you need to buy them.

  • Summarizing: If you are using cardiod mics, I would stay with the scarlett, and try to get a pair of omni-directional microphones --maybe somebody can lend them to you without buying them? – George Jul 3 '16 at 21:28

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