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How do I play the slide at the 1st string? Usually in slides, one slides from one fret to another, but I'm not quite sure as to the meaning of the notation given in the picture. How do I play it? Should I play the open 1st string only then slide to the 8th fret?

Help?!!

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    If not stated from where to slide from, I use my own descression from where to slide from, related to the song you are playing. I tend to slide from as far down as possible from a note that fits into key of the song, or from a note that sounds good. No use sliding from the lowest note on the neck (ie 0) if it does not fit into the progression or key or just plainly sounding bad – rock-on Feb 8 '17 at 10:22
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Slide from any fret lower than 8. It depends on the speed of the piece, and as xero says, what's played directly previous. Just get to target note in time, but unless there's 'proper' music written, it's hard to say exactly when that time is! One or two fret slide is o.k.

As an aside - the x on the tab indicates a harmonic - see my re-edit to your other question. What sort of harmonic, though, seems to be a secret only the writer knows! I suspect it could even be a tapped harmonic, where the string is tapped sharply on the node.

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    Isn't an X on on a tab a (dead note)[youtube.com/watch?v=vfbQ9HdDg9Q]? Where you stop the string from vibrating in no particular place? – xerotolerant Feb 8 '17 at 13:36
  • @xerotolerant - generally speaking true. However, looking at Code's other question, it occurred to me that perhaps these were used differently. Taking that as read, the tab/stave in that question tally. – Tim Feb 8 '17 at 14:00
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Well you probably can't reasonably slide up 8 frets. Just slide from the fret below. Also I can't see what is in the bar before. If it is a 7 then you have your answer. Also you can listen to a recording to know for sure.

I would slide from the fret below.

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Basically this means you can slide up from any fret up to the eighth. It's not strictly important where it starts from, as long as it ends on the correct fret, so that it stays in tune with the song.

You can be very expressive when you come across a note like this, as it's entirely up to you to determine the pitch of the slide, and the speed of the slide (so long as you stay in tempo).

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