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In root position a B7 chord in the key of E minor would be B,D#,F#,A and be made up of scale degrees ^5 ^#7 ^2 and ^4. So in 1st inversion the bass would be D#. If I was to add ^3 as a soprano note over this what chord options could I have? I know in root position ^3 is an extension of dominant but how does this fit in over D# in the bass? Are there other chord options with D# in the bass and G in the soprano? Is what I am hearing an inverted augmented chord (^#7 ^3 ^5)? Is this even a real chord? I quite like the sound of that resolving to a proper V65 chord because the ^3 resolves to ^2 which then resolves to ^1 in the tonic chord. So I kind of see why I like the voice leading but not sure what chord this could be.

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It is an augmented chord. As you're probably aware, rather like diminished chords, which could have basically 4 names, augmented chords could have basically 3.

Dependant on key. So, in key Em, D♯+ or G+ aren't as appropriate as B+, but it may make a difference as to what follows it. Generally speaking an augmented chord precedes one a fourth higher. So B+ > Em sounds good. How it gets voiced is basically up to the writer/player, but a common move would be D♯>E, the oft-used one semitone shift. In this case, the only note needing to move.

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  • thank you, so what you are saying is that inversions of augmented chords do not exist and one would say that B + in 1st inversion is infact D#+, is this correct?
    – armani
    Nov 24, 2022 at 11:43
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    @armani no. Inversions do exist, which is why Tim is saying that in E minor you're unlikely to have a D sharp augmented chord (which comprises D sharp, F double sharp, and A double sharp) but rather a first inversion B augmented chord (which comprises D sharp, F double sharp, and B). It's also possible to have a G augmented chord in E minor, which comprises in second inversion D sharp, G, and B.
    – phoog
    Nov 24, 2022 at 12:45
  • phoog, why wouldnt you have a 2nd inversion III+ chord? This would be the notes D# G and B
    – armani
    Nov 24, 2022 at 14:56
  • @armani you could, which is why the last sentence of my previous comment says "It's also possible to have a G augmented chord in E minor, which comprises in second inversion D sharp, G, and B." That isn't a D sharp augmented chord; it's a G augmented chord.
    – phoog
    Nov 25, 2022 at 8:37
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Isn't it intuitive - if you have a dominant chord built on the leading tone in a minor key with ^3 on top, you have a V13 chord in first inversion!

At this point, ditching the 5th of that inverted V13 chord so you have (drawing from your example in your question) D♯-B-A-G instead of the clash-producing D♯-F♯-B-A-G is a good idea.

An (inverted) augmented chord, D♯-B-G, is indeed in that V13 chord in first inversion, but hopefully, the 11th in that chord makes the augmented chord less noticeable.

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