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I want to create a mix between 2 songs but one of them is recorded with live musicians and the other is electronic music. Naturally the electronic music has a fixed BPM that doesn't change throughout the song, but the track recorded using live musicians varies its tempo quite a bit.

Is there a way I can easily "standardise" the BPM of the track recorded by live musicians to make it easier to mix in? Thanks!

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    I don’t know if you have Logic Pro but it looks like Logic can do that: support.apple.com/en-us/HT208458 – John Belzaguy Jul 9 at 4:29
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    The opposite - adapting the midi version to the recorded live version will be easier. – Albrecht Hügli Jul 9 at 5:13
  • Either way, you need to do a tempo map. Cubase can do this too, & frankly is easier to map audio than midi for this type of task. – Tetsujin Jul 9 at 7:48
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    @AlbrechtHügli That's not true at all. DAWs have had good "audio warp" capabilities for a long time. If you don't know how to do what the OP is asking, then you're 10-20 years behind what common applications can do. Particularly when doing an electronic remix, you want to straighten out the live stuff. Depending on the software you might need to read the manual, whichever way you try to warp. – piiperi Reinstate Monica Jul 9 at 10:57
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    @piiperi: I am working with wavelab, cubase and dorico and I know about audio warp and time stretch. All I say is: adapting midi to wave is easier. We don’t know how big the tempo variation is. OP says quite a bit ... – Albrecht Hügli Jul 9 at 16:36
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Most DAWs have some kind of facility to do this, though the exact name of the feature and way it works can vary. A couple of products have been mentioned in comments - another choice is Ableton Live, in which I believe you would use the 'warp' facility, which uses a number of markers along the timeline of the track as key points to snap to a grid.

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    IMO this is the Correct answer, because Ableton. It's surprising how big the difference in usability is between Cubase and Ableton. Cubase has everything and the kitchen sink in theory and in marketing - but in practice it's a total nightmare with an incredible array of concepts, tools, features and Marketing Names (tm). Reading the manual all the time, I never really got "warping" to work the way I wanted, never felt like being in control or understanding what is happening, huge frustration every time. Then try Ableton - instant success, great quality, I'm in control. Never looked back. – piiperi Reinstate Monica Jul 9 at 11:18

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