7

An alto (treble) recorder is about one and a half (3/2) times the size of soprano (descant). This means that the 2 spaces (between 3 consecutive holes) on an alto, will be roughly equal to the 3 spaces (between 4 holes) on a soprano. So three fingers on each hand of the alto will need to span a length that 4 fingers would on a soprano. Consequently, you can ...


5

In my opinion, what works for you is what works. Everyone's hands, wrists, and recorders are different. You seem to be analyzing your movements with great attention to detail; keep doing that. Practicing the 'best' movements will get them into your muscle memory and they'll become, if not quite second nature, at least third. You may find that you'll use ...


5

As you've observed, the intonation of a recorder is highly sensitive to the pressure it's played at, i.e. to the dynamics. It should not be understood as a “keyed” instrument where the fingers just select from a discrete number of pitches and the mouth is only responsible for dynamics and phrasing, but rather as a “fretless” instrument where the fingers ...


3

It’s impossible to answer definitely because you’d need to try an instrument to see for yourself if you can cover the holes. There are decent inexpensive plastic recorders available which would enable you to try the compass for yourself, which would be your best option. Whilst tenor and above may be beyond your hand span, many players with smaller hand ...


3

On the flute (and probably on the recorder) it's almost impossible to play this in one breath. It's probably playable in two breaths, but there is no good solution. I have a recording of Emmanuel Pahud playing this, where he breathes at the end of bar 36 and I think this is probably the best of the bad solutions. If you need three breaths then the end of bar ...


3

I can't say for definite that your recorder is fine, but I suspect so. In the past I have played recorders and found that it is definitely hard to play loudly on alto and tenor recorders, especially in the bottom half of the ranges of these instruments. I found the problem is worse with the tenor than with the alto, and it might well be because of these ...


2

Rule #1 is to do what works for you. I don't do everything on the recorder the same way my teacher does, because I don't get on with some of her playing technique (particularly her method for left-hand thumb placement). You do have to know why you're doing what you're doing though, you can't just say "that looks hard" and do something else because it might ...


2

The decibel level you can reach and still maintain pitch does increase as the recorders get shorter, but I agree that your main problem may be technique. That being said, playing a soprano "quietly" is not easy, esp. up above G6. Altos are mellower, tenors even more so. There are tenors being made with keys (Mollenhauer) that are playable by children so ...


2

Small hands don't matter. It's true that high-pitched sounds tend to be more annoying than midrange. But to get to the root of the problem: it sounds like you have breath control difficulties, and those can only be corrected by taking some lessons. You shouldn't have to "overblow" to reach the higher octave(s), and while some of that depends on just how ...


2

Short answer: no. Bluetooth was not designed for live sound. Bluetooth audio latency is in the region of 150 ms. If you happen to have an apt-X-enabled bluethooth device the latency is 30-40 ms, which from what I understand is as low as you can get. This might be acceptable for watching video, although just barely. For live sound (PA) use it is completely ...


2

Old John is correct -- the larger the recorder the softer it sounds, particularly the bottom 4 notes or so. Air speed is a big factor, if you slam a lot of air into any recorder it will squeak and complain, however, if you can put more air into the recorder steadily ('support' your breathing) you can make much more fuller and somewhat louder sound in the low ...


2

It is usually not good practice to take a breath just before a dynamic maximum, especially after a crescendo: it will break the sentence. Personally, i would sneak in a quick breath right at the end of bar 34, when the decrescendo ends and you start a new sentence. I would be able to reach from 35 to D on one breath, but if you must, you could sneak another ...


2

The recorder has a very limited range of dynamics. If the instrument is very sharp, you are blowing too hard.


1

The American Recorder Society (ARS) says: Some players with smaller hands will find starting on the alto difficult. ... However, there are models available from ARS Business Members to help players with small hands avoid fatigue when playing. (From the ARS FAQ page; link added.) In addition to the ARS Business Members, you can try contacting the ...


1

The alto recorder in F is a fifth lower than the soprano in C. As you say, the lowest note is F. If you have a melody to play that goes lower than F, you can't play it in the same octave as your low F- you have to play it an octave higher. That would mean, for your example, that your first note B is not the lowest B of the alto, but in the second octave, ...


1

Patrx2's answer is spot on. Playing a recorder in tune and on pitch requires a certain amount of breath pressure. If you don't put enough air into a recorder it will be flat and soft; too much air and you'll be louder and sharp. The fingering for each note also contributes -- the more fingers down the softer the note will be and the less pressure you need. ...


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