11

Because B and C are one semitone apart, you have access to every chromatic note, (and many notes twice) if you have both of those diatonic scales. The top half of the diagram above shows which notes are available in the B and C diatonic scales, and whether you push or pull to get them. I'm not sure, but I think different octaves might have different push/...


9

The accepted answer states proposes the middle finger on the key bass to start. It is listed under "as a general rule (for my songs so far)". I tend to suspect that the parenthetical remark points to little actual experience underlying the urge to provide a helpful answer to another beginner. That's actually a rather strange starting position: the typical ...


8

If you google "double keyboard piano accordion" you can see at least a couple of different designs have been manufactured, one being the Soprani Luttbeg. They're very rare though, so if you want to try the idea out for yourself you could get hold of two identical piano accordions and swap the piano section of one for the button section of the other (this may ...


7

It's generally considered that keyboard (piano) is the best instrument to use when trying to understand (unravel!) theory. If you mean a piano accordion, then the keyboard part is similar - except it's not as readily see-able as a piano. You've also other issues, like left hand is doing something entirely different, AND you have to keep the thing moving ...


7

There are two primary types of accordion: stradella and free bass. Although free bass accordions are somewhat more common in the classical music world (and I’ve been told they are somewhat more common in Europe than in America), the stradella is the more common. There are even some accordions capable of switching between the two modes. In a free bass ...


5

High budget solution The only very effective way to amplify an accordion is with multiple microphones attached to the accordion itself. On this picture you can see three, but I've usually seen people using four microphones (two on each side): Remember that the sound of an accordion does not come from one central spot; each note comes from a different place ...


5

I think your answer might depend on what style (and key, and so on) of music you are playing, as well as what size (style? I don't know the word) of accordion you are using. I use the standard 120-button size accordion, and as a general rule (for my songs so far) I place my middle finger on C to start. I think I shift my middle finger to the key of the song ...


5

Well, the differences are not all that much qualitatively. You can get by on three rows a bit better with B system. Fingerings are a bit more similar to piano with C system. In particular: if you ever take to piano accordion (as an extra instrument or not), the left hand system for single-note bass playing (namely on a converter instrument) is identical ...


4

When you're in the key of C, you can also play in D dorian, F lydian, G mixolydian, etc. So each 'key' is actually very flexible. Also if we constrained ourselves to the major pentatonic scale, you will see that an instrument in C can perfectly well play in C, F, and G. Or with minor pentatonics, that same C instrument can play in d, e, and a. Pretty ...


4

Well, for one, there are many more cultures in Russia than just Russians. If it's Siberian you're looking for, then search for that. And other regions nearby. There's also some musical overlap between Siberian, Mongolian, and Tuvan folk styles. "Peoples of Russia" is a good search term for general ethnographic information. There have been several books with ...


4

With regard to instruments aging: cheap instruments age a lot more than expensive ones, and well-kept old instruments age very little. My own instrument is a special build from 1960 custom-made for a soloist. Its action is noisier and heavier than that of new instruments of similar class. Its sound and responsiveness, however, is of the kind where you ...


4

Your right hand will not be quite well prepared. It's more like your key-finding head is somewhat prepared. The piano keyboard is not as much velocity-sensitive as it is momentum-sensitive: you need to transfer a certain momentum in order to arrive at a certain loudness (unweighted or "semi-weighted" velocity-sensitive keyboards are not really an adequate ...


4

While the diminuished chord leaves out the fifth to the fundamental, the minor third and diminuished seventh also combine into a minor fifth. So the diminuished row is mostly useful for chords already containing a diminuished fifth (like the dominant seventh between seventh and major third). So the number of chords where it comes in handy is limited. It's ...


4

The D/G melodeon is a lot easier to play, but as already stated is really best for English (morris) dance music. The pull-push action of going up and down the scales give accent to the dancing. The basses are a lot easier too. Most of the push and pull treble notes harmonise with the basses, and there is just one note really (E in G scale) which doesn't ...


3

Generally, the accordion standard bass is rather uninterested in inversions, less so than even the guitar. In almost all registrations, the respective chord notes sound in several octaves simultaneously and the chosen inversion is not determined by the player but by the layout of the chord reed banks. The chords are "grounded" by playing an appropriate ...


3

I'd recommend chromatic button accordion since its keys are arranged according to chromatic pitch, like those of the guitar, making it better suitable for improvised playing. The keys of a piano (or piano accordion) instead mimic the note layout in scores: if you are going to do a lot of sightreading, that simplifies things. Button accordions (particularly ...


3

A bayan is a button accordion (there are several others of course). But 20lb is not likely a real bayan (which is a converter instrument with large reed plates for multiple reeds). The weight is not all that relevant since a bayan is played while sitting down. A bandonion is somewhat lighter and a full size bandonion is pretty universal for playing but ...


3

I play both piano and accordion and I would say piano, because: There's a huge amount of piano learning material and sheet music for piano. Accordion has some learning material and music but it's not uncommon for there not to be an accordion arrangement of a song you want to play. Far easier to find a piano teacher than an accordion teacher Easier to see ...


3

I have played accordion for (too) many years and my main use of the diminished chord buttons was to play a diminished chord. The Stradella bass arrangement drops the fifth out of both the dominant seventh and diminished seventh chords. This gives some flexibility (and balances the sound of 4-note vs 3-note chords) in playing less common chords. (The dominant ...


3

I'd say your book is a bit obsessive. Now it's true that a lot of accordion players, in particular those playing the accordion as a portable piano, severely underestimate the importance of bellows control. It's like not worrying about bowing when playing the violin. That's where the soul of the sound originates. To make use of that, you need to have a ...


3

I know almost nothing about accordions, but I did find a fingering chart that includes 60 bass. There seem to be many models that have 60 bass keys so you need to give more information for that part of the question.


2

I am fairly certain the sheet music is for concertina, specifically chemnitzer concertina. Here is an image of some chemnitzer concertina notation: A text description of the notation method is difficult to find online but this image: should help translate if you are indeed looking to play the music on a concertina or transpose to your piano accordion.


2

Any dynamic mic should work. I have seen accordionists use Sm57s in the past. The instrument is quite loud, and occupies a wide swath of the spectrum. Some folks opt for two microphones - one on each side of the accordian. Some companies sell clip on mics for accordians, but I imagine these are more for convenient movement than for good sound. Some accordian ...


2

You mentioned two goals in your question. You want to enhance your understanding of music theory but also wonder which of two instruments are easier to play. I think the other answers have adequately addressed the differences between an accordion and a piano in terms of playability and how they relate to music theory. And you did not really ask about ...


2

You can play X7b9 or X7b9b13 chords. Let's take D7b9, for example. You take the D bass from the major third bass row and play Eb dim chord from the diminished row. As a result you get D bass + Eb-Gb-C chord. In a similar way, you play D7b9b13 when you press the same D bass + Eb minor from the minor chords row + Eb dim and you get D + Eb-Gb-Bb-C.


2

While both C and B systems are supported by most manufacturers, my personal recommendation would be the C system, particularly because there are more qualified instructors in North America and the British Isles. If you are more interested in Russian and Eastern European music, then go for the B system. An excellent resource for C system to obtain is "Das ...


2

Just a suggestion from a non-accordion-playing musician. Yes, muscular memory sounds right to me. I would suggest that you break it down - pick an easy key (say C maj?) and acquaint your bass playing fingers with the C, G and F buttons. Play as many simple pieces as you can that use those three notes/chords. Firstly just play the bass, then eventually add ...


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