24

I'm going to post the dissenting answer here in that I feel like you don't want to look for a different kind of guitar or a perfect strap height. Most of my time in bands has been with at least one female guitarist or guitarist/bassist in the band, and in one band that I was in for a few years I was the only man. I also am a big fan of several bands feature ...


14

There are several reasons why electric guitars have thinner necks than acoustic guitars. Part of it is just convention, primarily relating to the styles of music for which a guitar is designed. Classical guitar playing requires a wider string spacing to facilitate easy access to each string. Even within steel-string acoustic guitars, there is considerable ...


7

A number of years back, I found a solution which helped me position my guitar exactly where I wanted when I was standing up. The answer is a string running from the strap button, across the top of the lower bout of the guitar, to the strap at the other side near your shoulder. This lets you angle the guitar neck however you want, adjust the guitar balance ...


7

The simple answer is no. There is nothing that will be damaged if you take the neck off for a while. I have various guitars that live in this state between necks and the only thing that I need to do is sort the truss rod whenever I a set up a new neck, but that needs to be done with any new neck.


6

Not only would your fretted notes play flat, but as you go further up the fretboard, the flatter your notes will get!


6

This is why I highly recommend learning the scale by scale degrees rather than simple box positions that don't show any of that data. Knowing your note names is also important to know where your tonic is, but I'd argue that knowing your scale degrees is just as important since it allows you to still play the same patterns up and down the neck but in ...


6

Many folks think it's a rather simple operation of just tightening the nut on the truss rod, but actually it is recommended that the neck be clamped in a jig that causes the neck to be bent backwards the desired amount and then tighten the truss rod in order to hold it in the newly desired position. Many a truss rod has been ruined by trying to force the ...


5

I sought advice on this site last year, before buying a short-scale bass guitar: What are the disadvantages of buying a short-scale bass guitar I've found the short-scale bass a wonderful instrument to practice, learn and perform on. One of my concerns was that if I was handed a full-scale bass, my skills wouldn't transfer. I've found that it's fine. I ...


5

It really doesn't matter what it is called. As Tim points out, even if you find a C profile, it may be of a particular radius, or a variable radius. You may prefer a D in a wide radius, but a C in a smaller radius? Or you may want to look at a V or even one of the stranger profiles like the amazing Strandberg neck which works really well if you use a ...


5

For E minor (for example): -------------------------------------------------------14-15-17/19-20- -------------------------------------------12/13-15/17---------------- --------------------------------9-11-12/14---------------------------- ----------------------7/9-10-12--------------------------------------- -------------5-7/9-10----------------------------...


5

I see now in the comments that the OP has now mentioned a specific, special guitar, and @leftaroundabout has answered with the appropriate information for that guitar. This is answer is applicable to most conventional electrics, but is probably not to relevant to the actual guitar in question.) You don't have to take them off, but you should loosen the ...


4

All the notes would play flat (lower in pitch). The 12th fret (for example) should normally be halfway along the string, so that it sounds an octave higher than the open string. If the bridge saddle is further from the 12th fret than the nut is, the 12th fret would play a pitch lower than the octave above the open string.


4

Truss rod adjustments do not usually affect the neck with an immediate change. Depending on the base wood, it could take 30 minutes to an hour before the truss rod has had it's full effect on the neck. My recommendation would be to wait 30 minutes to an hour and check again. If you feel you have made the proper adjustments, but your guitar neck is skill ...


4

Most fret buzzing is a result of the vibrating string contacting another fret as it vibrates in an oscillating arc. There are several things that commonly cause this to happen. Neck does not have enough relief or has a back bow. The vibrating/oscillating string must clear all the frets between where it is fretted and the bridge. If the neck is ...


4

The only way to know is to experience playing them. Whilst there may be names for the neck profiles, hand profiles are more difficult to classify - although medical students may have some ideas... There's also the depth of the neck to consider, at different points along it, and the width often varies instrument to instrument, maker to maker. Then, there's ...


4

It's not the guitar. The F barre chord is usually a challenging chord for beginners on every guitar. Personally, I never play the F barre chord at the first fret and I've been playing for 25+ years. It's just too uncomfortable for my playing style and guitar position, and not worth it. I play it without a barre by leaving off the high F note and either ...


4

Very briefly: I reckon a shorty is way easier to play for those without huge hands, often lighter which is a bonus if you have long sets, and a well-chosen one can sound absolutely fine in most styles of music (if a tiny bit rubbery compared to most 34" instruments). Full-length (34/35") instruments usually sound a little more satisfying / versatile, and ...


3

For a reference, you could look up for guitar players who may have a similar body type as yours, and try to figure out how they are getting comfortable at what they are doing. Playing while standing up will always feel different than sitting down, so with time most players figure it out automatically. Just make sure your strap feels comfortable to you. A ...


3

The fret spacing (distance of each fret from the saddle) is very precise for any given scale length. Many guitar manufacturers stick with common scale lengths so they don't have to constantly re-calculate the fret spacing. But the scale length varies between guitar builders and some even offer options for different scale lengths. Moving the bridge even ...


3

First port of call - Paul Reed Smith. He may well have seen the problem before. It makes life easier to slacken the strings before tightening the truss rod.While they're loose, try to turn another turn, you'll feel if it's binding or the thread has gone, more easily.


3

Maybe this was already covered but nylon strings move a whole lot more than steel ones. They are slacker and therefore they vibrate with a much larger amplitude - which means you need higher action. And they also bend all over the place - I find it a struggle not to bend by accident - plus to bend by a semitone you need to physically bend the string much ...


3

Short answer: Yes, but... The first guitar I bought was a Peavey Predator, a bottom-of-the-line, budget Strat clone. Several years later I came across a good deal on Fender Custom Shop Strat pickups, so I got them to put in the Predator. Yes, it did improve the sound a lot, but like your guitar the frets were very worn, the tuning machines were terrible, ...


3

The three things that determine the height of a guitar's action are the nut, the saddle and the neck bow. Unless something else is wildly out of whack (like the the guitar's top lifting or the bridge peeling up), it's the neck bow that should be attended to first. Why? Well, because it works, and because you can always 'undo' an adjustment to the truss rod, ...


3

One way to play the scales all over the neck is to practice the 5 shapes. Look at the 5 images on this page: https://eatsleepguitar.com/2014/03/20/the-foundation-pentatonic-diatonic-scales/ All the red and grey dots represent a scale at that position. You'll notice the red dots represent the Pentatonic scale. When you add the grey dots to them, you get the ...


3

You should be very careful about pushing things with the truss rod. You can damage the neck and strip the truss rod if you tighten it too much. You might want to loosen the truss rod a bit, and try lowering the action on the bridge and/or shimming the neck. Here's a good article about that: Guitar Shop 101: How to Shim a Bolt-On Neck. Having said all that, ...


3

The whole thing is made from carbon fiber, no wood at all Well, that's highly relevant. Most carbon fibre necks don't have any truss rod at all, because unlike wood, the stuff can never warp after the epoxy matrix has set (only elastically bend, or else splinter completely). Perhaps this truss rod isn't really meant to fulfill the structural support role it ...


3

The truss rod in a guitar is for adjusting the neck relief, not a direct way to adjust the action. You can get slightly better action by reducing the relief of a neck that is set very deep, but there is only a small amount that can be gained that way. Action adjustment is primarily done at the nut and the bridge, and is affected by the neck angle as set to ...


3

Wood-to-wood contact is ideal. I seriously doubt the stickers are making a discernible difference in sound, but YMMV. If you do decide to remove them, you may find that the tilt of the neck relative to the body has been altered -- it takes less than a millimeter at the joint to adversely affect the angle and therefore playability. Do this with caution and ...


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