10

Snare resonator heads are supposed to be ridiculously thin. Don't worry about that. The best way to control the sustain of any drum is with tuning (it's also important for best tone). Snares also have, well, snares that can be tuned a bit. But definitely start with tuning the drum. Basically, every drum has a lowest resonant frequency based on its diameter ...


6

Flam a grace note followed by an accent Drag two quick grace notes followed by an accent The amount of space between the two notes in a drag is somewhat subjective. Depending on whether you are a drum-set player (probably diddle) or a rudimental snare player (a buzz). This explains more exactly: To answer your question:...


4

I'm sure you will find many programs that give you want you are looking for (any notation program for example). However, you need to learn to play the rhythms yourself. Using the programs will result in you learning by rote, which is essentially just copying what you're hearing without really understanding the concepts. This is akin to being a parrot. ...


4

Drum heads don't last for ever. Cracking is a standard failure mode. It may SOUND ok, but does it 'bounce' the same way when practicing rolls etc.? If so, carry on if you like. If you go on playing, the worst that is going to happen is that it cracks more. No biggie. No point in telling US the details of your drum. You need to tell the music shop ...


3

Remo makes their Classic Fit line which are made for "oversized drums made prior to the mid 60’s." They appear to be available in a 13" size. I'd assume other manufacturers have similar lines to this. If the dimension is a whole number such as 12”or less, then our standard 12” batter head will work fine. If the dimension is a larger than 12”, such as 12-...


3

I would add a different aspect to the existing answers. While, yes, drum heads crack eventually (I have yet to experience that), you might want to pay some attention to the reasons that lead there. What I mean is (note that I have no clue about your playing level but considering the question I would conclude it is not too high): Technique. The drum is to ...


3

Drum heads stretch and degrade over time. Sometimes they crack. Sometimes they tear. Sometimes all the material in then batter head wears off. Replacing drumheads is normal and how often depends on how they’re used. You can get drumheads from just about any music store or online - you can see the prices for yourself. Be sure to match the headsize with the ...


3

Yes, plenty. Guitar Pro is commercial, but there are free alternatives: http://sourceforge.net/projects/tuxguitar/ I'm sure Tux has the MIDI voice for percussion available.


3

Out on a bit of a limb here, but dampen the top head, make sure the two heads are non resonant, and tighten the snare itself. Haven't played proper drums for decades, but that's the way I'd go.


2

If all you want is eighth notes on the snare drum, then don’t use Drummer at all. Create that specific part yourself. Just create a drum track and do one of the following: record a bar of yourself tapping eighth notes on the snare drum record an empty bar, then tap the bar and choose “Edit” and in the drum editor, pick up the pen by sliding the pen slider ...


2

Many of the referenced thread's pros and cons of a trad grip for a right handed player still hold true for a left handed player, namely a trad grip for a leftie would still look subjectively cool, and would still make it easier to play softly, as much as that is ever true. It will still be tricky to maintain balance, and will create similar obstacles in ...


1

Usually, depending on the velocity (how hard you hit your piano key), the sound changes. So a very hard hit would be triggering a different sound than a soft stroke. If you found a sound you like, look up the velocity of that particular note (you can check the piano roll in Garageband), and set that velocity to all your other notes.


1

First, I wouldn't normally tune to perfect fourths or perfect fifths. Instead, I would look for the lowest resonance of the shell and start off tuning to that. From there, if I don't like the sound, I might tune up to the next resonance. Finding notes where the shell resonates helps you get the most sound and character out of the drum. This is why DW shells ...


1

The snare head determines the response speed of the snares. The tighter the head, faster and more controlled the response. I'd start by cranking the bottom head with 3 full turns on each tension rod. When I snare drum isn't behaving the way I'd like it to, I can usually fix it by tightening the bottom head.


1

Try to make your bottom snare head tight and also the snare wire.Give some more importance to snare head.my suggestion is dry drum head. Don't place a monitor speaker direction straight to snare drum.


1

I teach ancient style snare on old rope drums, so we only do traditional. I can't comment on the pros and cons of each for lefties, but I have noticed that they pick up the traditional grip more easily than righties. Last night I had a first lesson with a pair of twins, one righty and one lefty. It was obvious the lefty "got" the grip much more quickly than ...


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