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when I'm picking a "bass" can I choose any instrument..? Yes, you can. However, you might find that not all instruments work well to your ears as 'bass' instruments. When you see 'bass' in a synth patch name, it usually doesn't only refer to the instrument being low - because, as you say, you can usually play low notes with any sound in a synth. ...


10

Simple as that. Bass refers to the range of the instrument, so electronically, turn a piccolo into a bass if you want. It's much harder with fish, though. Turning a salmon into a bass doesn't seem to work as well...


6

I don't know why I wrote all this but here goes: Note duration in MIDI The way most synthesizers and samplers (and other similar instruments) work is constrained by the conceptual model behind the MIDI standard from 1982. In that model, there is (1) a controller keyboard (physical or virtual) and (2) a "synth", i.e. a sound-producing component (...


5

An envelope follower uses the volume from a sound to generate an envelope signal which can then be used to control a parameter of an effect. The most popular use for an envelope follower is to control a filter to create an auto-wah effect, but there are envelope followers that feature output of the envelope signal itself to be used to control other effects. ...


4

High resonance [Q], hi-pass filter sweep. Likely playing one or more notes of the chord structure as it changes - this will be a significant part of the sound, switching up the inversions & spread of the notes as this section increases in sonic impact. What the sound is underneath would be quite hard to tell, but obviously one with a lot of high ...


4

When it comes to MIDI sequencing, a DAW (like cakewalk) sends MIDI messages to a MIDI synthesizer plugin. It's the job of that synthesizer plugin to decide how to respond to those MIDI messages. Often, a synthesizer playing percussion sounds will be set up so that it doesn't respond to MIDI note-off messages (at the end of the note), so that the MIDI message ...


4

I suspect that may aspects of sound that might subjectively be thought of as warm will (as so much in life) lie not in the extremes, but somewhere in the middle of the spectrum of various possible sonic characteristics. For example.... People often associate having strong low-end frequencies with warmth, but some very strong bass might seem unnatural or ...


3

No.1 is easy to answer: every conceivable sound has a potential musical use, so of course that includes any possible synthesizer sound. No.2 is unanswerable without a rigorous definition of what sounds correspond to physical instruments No.3 is easy: the field of study is called "synthesis". The emulation of physical instruments is just a small ...


3

Part of the confusion here appears to be that ‘bass’ is (a) the name of a range (~16-256 Hz), (b) the name of a specific instrument, the double bass (similar to a violin, but much bigger), (c) the name of a specific instrument, the bass guitar (bigger than the regular kind, cf. (d)), and (d) used in the names of a whole lot of instruments to denote that they ...


3

If you simply want to connect two sources to the same speaker, this is usually a big no-no. The problem is that the two sources will also be connected to each other, and they will try to drive each other, and neither one is meant to be driven by anything, so there is potential equipment damage. However, if you are only connecting passive guitars or basses, ...


3

Sound design serves almost exactly the same purpose in electronic music that instrumentation does in orchestral music. Orchestral composers will play with elements like giving different lines to different instruments, giving instructions for articulation and dynamics, and using unique techniques like pizzicato strings or brass mutes to create a specific ...


3

The most obvious thing is consistent levels. You don't want jumps in volume, and you don't want plosives. Start with the recording. You need a good pop filter, and you want someone with the right kind of voice who knows how not to pop their plosives too much. Then a large-diaphragm microphone is your friend, ideally a dynamic mic like an SM7 (the classic ...


2

If you mean the parts like the one starting around... ...I think you want a synth pad. This seems like a nice tutorial just to get the concept of pads: But, you can find plugins for pads that are preset with that kind of "sweeping" sound, you don't necessarily need to create your own....


2

One thing that tends to make almost anything sound "soft" is compression, possibly with just a touch of reverb. So, try applying a compression to the different instruments in the mix, testing different levels and settings, and you will probably get something useful. Of course, there's a lot more to it, and various other answers contain important ...


2

I'll add a tip, with the disclaimer that I'm a performer not a recording engineer: Pay attention to envelopes. In particular, if the goal is to avoid anything too jarring—crash, bang, click, pop—then you want to avoid "plosives," and probably want to soften the attacks of impulses. At the same time, my (limited) understanding of ASMR is that it's ...


2

Yes, whether using traditional instruments or designing your own - and any sound used in a musical composition can be considered an 'instrument' - a composer chooses a sound that suits the music. If you need a pad, don't score pizzicato strings. If you've written a sprightly melody, a slow attack isn't going to be much use. Incidentally, your timpani ...


2

Once one's used a good quality grand piano, one realises that its action is as good as it gets, and anything less is, well, less. Even most uprights seem lacking after, in some areas. Weighted actions will, however, vary, make/model to make/model. Grands will also have a far faster key recovery mechanism, which can help playing a fair bit. The sostenuto ...


1

Pianos did not did not drop finished from heaven, but were adapted over the centuries to cover additional requirements by pianists trying to get the most out them. So the more similarity a digital instruments achieves, the better it will support serious interpretation. Digital instruments covers a tremendous price range, and it is out of question, that ...


1

This seems like a lot objective and qualitative questions surrounding a subjective core: the phrase "musically useful." For something to be musically un-useful, a host of assumptions about aesthetic context and aim come into play. (Cue a reference to Hindemith and "Music for use?") Synthesis was born and evolved through experimentation ...


1

The one that comes to my mind, that is an actual, common effect, is gated reverb. It's combination of noise gate and reverb. I don't really know the sound engineering of it beyond a summary. The noise gate part is based on amplitude (volume.) When the amplitude goes up high, like hitting snare drum, the reverb is applied, then when the amplitude drops down, ...


1

BOSS SY-300 has an audio interface. You can connect it to the computer via USB cable and use any kind of audio recording or visualisation software you like.


1

It's important to remember that the voicing of the chord is only one variable.   Everything from the amp settings, microphone choice, microphone placement, control settings on the guitar, string gauge, pickup type, pickup height, the room in which you record, and the guitarist her/himself will also play a role—in many cases, a bigger role—in the overall ...


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