24

This is standard procedure for electric guitars. See, a guitar amp is almost rather part of the instrument than just a loudspeaker: it critically shapes the sound. You might say the speaker cabinet is a substitute for the body of an acoustic guitar: its primary purpose may be to just get you heard, but there's a lot more than just loudness to the art of ...


10

They are like earbuds but better. You want your in-ear monitors to block sound, because you might want to hear the drums to keep in time but you need to hear the keys/guitar/harmony instrumental and yourself so you can keep yourself in tune, and if the drum kit bled into your hearing, it could easily overpower everything and leave you lost. You have the ...


8

I play both cello and E-bass live with rock bands. For cello (this would probably extend quite well to most other acoustic instruments) in-ears are nothing short of a blessing. With conventional monitoring, feedback is always a very serious threat. With in-ear it's seldom an issue at all. I can always hear my own notes excellently, which makes intonation a ...


8

Stage monitors generally come in two varieties- powered and unpowered. The first need AC power (220v in U.K.) to run, just as an ordinary guitar amp., p.a. etc. would.The other is passive, in that it is a speaker cab.As such, it will need an amp. externally to run it, as well as being connected, often by jack plug, to the sound out. Phantom power is DC, and ...


8

There are many electrical advantages to "air-gapping" the PA from the backline. You avoid ground loops and other kinds of issues that arise from connecting equipment directly. Even more important, changing from one band to another is much easier when you just move the mic out of the way, let the guitarist/tech set up the back line, and then place the mic. No ...


6

You can definitely do something like that. One potential problem is not having independent monitor level controls for every channel in the additional mixer (let's call it mixer 2). If that matters to you, you can run monitor outputs through a simple two-channel passive mixer (mixer 3), for example. You can use separate effects. Using the same effect and ...


6

TRS (Tip-Ring-Sleeve) is the name often given to the connector, rather than the cable as such, though of course they would usually be used with a 3-conductor cable. This could be used for stereo purposes, but it could also be used for other things : e.g. as a mono send/mono return for an insert effect (like a compressor on one channel of a mixer), or as a ...


6

Yes, if you're using IEMs (particularly if you're using them in BOTH ears) mixing in an audience mic is standard technique. IEMs solve many problems. But they put you even MORE at the mercy of the sound operator. Some of the problems they solve can also be addressed by NOT PLAYING SO LOUD!


6

I think you'll find that this is not limited to rock bands. Any time there are seated musicians in more than one row, it is quite likely that the rows in the back will be elevated. This certainly helps with visibility in both directions (so the trombones can't claim they don't see the conductor ) and to some extent also helps with sound projection. You'...


5

If at all possible, using in-ear monitoring has many benefits over using a speaker of any kind. (You can hear it better and you avoid feedback.) Custom in-ears can be expensive, but there are very decent models for under $50. Otherwise... well, yeah, I guess you could use a guitar amp as a stage monitor, if you were on a desert island and had no other ...


5

You may absolutely use a spare guitar amplifier as your personal vocal monitor. Set the amp up clean (no Gain higher than 2, and the Bass, Middle, and Treble at 12 o'clock at first) and run the mono cable from your Mix Out (or Monitor Out, depending upon the PA head) jack of the stage PA to the Instrument Input of that amp. Keep the amp tilted back and ...


5

Yes but... My covers band did exactly this for a year or so, until I could afford a couple of reasonable monitors. It certainly works, but there are issues. The most obvious problem is that a guitar amp takes an unbalanced input. Balanced cables and inputs are the only practical way to get the relatively small audio signals over relatively long distances ...


4

There are already some good answers, but I just had a couple things to add. In general it's best to minimize the length of cable and number of adapters you use in your signal chain (I think you called the adapters "jacks"). This reduces the number of possible failure points. For example, do you really need the headphone extension cable? And getting the right ...


4

As I am sure you are aware - the TRS connector tip is capable of transmitting a stereo signal (separate left and right signal) from a stereo output jack to a stereo input. The output jack must be wired as a TRS output in order to route the separate stereo channels into the appropriate wires inside the cable. You will find this scenario on stereo headphones. ...


4

Here's what I have done with more than two mixers and I suggest trying this. Assuming your mixers (like most of them) both have Tape In and Tape Out RCA inputs, just run RCA from Tape Out of one mixers into Tape In of the other. The Tape In should have its own fader/control pot. This will let you keep all of the channels in each mixer free. You should be ...


4

Entirely feasible. In my studio, there's a small mixer for all the keyboards, which is fed in stereo to two channels of the main mixer. Or could go to a single stereo channel. That way, I save 8 channels and substitute them for one, or two, on the main. There are many smallish mixers, stereo, which have monitor mix facilities as well as eq. Often there are ...


4

Now you've asked a specific question, you can have a specific answer! Your yamaha mg124cx has its stereo main outputs arranged as a pair of balanced TRS 1/4" jacks. (The outputs are duplicated on a pair of balanced XLR sockets, which carry an identical electrical signal. But we don't need to worry about that for now.) Your Focusrite Scarlett 2i2 has ...


4

I have seen musicians play on stage while barefoot. It depends on the venue as to whether that is appropriate or not. If you are in a classy music venue (Grand Ole Opry, Bluebird Cafe, Red Clay Music Foundry, etc.) or in a restaurant - the dress code might preclude going openly barefoot. But if it's a laid back outdoor concert at a music festival, there ...


4

Musicians who play barefoot - Sandie Shaw, in the 1960's in the UK; Todd Agnew (US Christian singer) - and probably more. Our drummer plays barefoot so he can feel the pedals better. If electric shock due to being barefoot is a possibility, taking your shoes off is the last thing to worry about! Fix the electrical problem first! Some stages are a little ...


4

Agreeing with Dave. The main point of iems is to block out as much extraneous sound as possible. Otherwise, they have little purpose. Each performer wearing them will request the mix that is most helpful for themselves, so there could well be several different mixes in the iems. If they let in sound from other players - say the performer was standing near ...


3

The connection between sub-mixer and main mixer doesn't have to be RCA., it could be jack to jack, or XLR. With 50', you may need balanced leads, so it will depend where physically your snake is, or use a stereo or mono feed with shielded cable between sub and main. Or use a D.I. box to help the signal.


3

There is no significant difference between two unbalanced mono connections and a single stereo connection. However, with two mono lines you have the option of making both balanced, which is usually a good idea for longer connections. With single-cable stereo, this is typically not possible because suitable 5-lead connectors aren't available (at least not ...


3

Take a close look at both Cable 1 and the adapter (jack) connecting Cable 1 to the amp. Are you sure that these are both stereo devices? A stereo plug will have three metal sections (tip, ring, and sleeve). A mono plug will only have two (tip and sleeve). If you are hearing only one side, and then get both sides when you pull it part way out, that is a ...


3

I do not know all the pros and cons, but I do know a few: Pros: Having an ear monitor means that you won't really need a normal monitor to hear. So, you move around the stage freely, and wherever you go, you'll be able to hear through your ear monitor. The sound is being sent directly into the canal of your ear, thus you'll be able to hear the music better....


3

This looks like an guitar amplifier. The amplifier is a key part of the sound of an electric guitar. If you want to capture that sound, you need to mic the amp, rather than using a DI. I believe you can get amp modelling pedals, but I've mostly seen microphone setups like your picture. A counterexample would be a keyboard amp. The amp here is usually not ...


3

It isn't very practical but it is good practice by the sound tech to give the musician whatever monitor mix they feel like they want to hear. But I would suggest you just ask for a limiter (which is also a good idea to have when using ears anyway) and maybe a multi-band compressor to help keep the high end from piercing your ear drums.


3

It's going to get you close, but will still need tweaking for each gig - it might be better to get it right at some of the regular gigs you do, and save those. The sound guys will be able to give a general nudge eq-wise, to the sound you have from the mixer, so you'll generally be in the right ball park, more with balance between mics, instruments,etc. ...


2

Phantom power is just a way to transmit DC power over microphone cables. It's most used for condenser mics and direct boxes (DIs). Phantom powering consists of a phantom circuit where direct current is applied equally through the two signal lines of a balanced audio connector (in modern equipment, usually an XLR connector). The supply voltage is referenced ...


2

Tried them a few years back and I found two issues. 1. When playing saxophone you get an effect like singing with your fingers in your ears. Paid quite a bit more for Sensophonic in ear (molded to my ear) buds which go further into the ear canal and reduce the fingers in the ears whilst singing effect to a degree. 2. Its a solitary experience and even with ...


2

I play in a 90's band. 4-piece band, 2 guitars, bass and drums. Pros: You can hear yourself and each other's vocals much better so singing is improved and harmony blends are better. Stage monitors are gone and not cluttering the stage. It protects hearing because you are listening at much lower decibel levels than the stage sound level. Better than ...


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