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32

I'm going to go with "it was always common". Certainly many Renaissance madrigals are written to "you" (or "thee", as the case may be): Come again! Sweet love doth now invite Thy graces that refrain To do me due delight. To see, to hear, To touch, to kiss, To die with thee again in sweetest sympathy. Come Again, John Dowland, c.1597 ...


13

Nope! It's not necessarily a mismatch. The major or minor quality of the key a song is in is only one of many, many qualities that determine its emotion. It gets to the point that a major song can be very sad, and a minor song can be very happy, depending on the context. For concrete examples, "Last Train Home" by the Pat Metheny group (listen on Spotify) ...


11

Do you need lyrics? If it is hard to write them, it's easiest to skip them and compose instrumental music. If this is not an option, do you have a friend that can write them? Not all musicians write lyrics. In a band it is common that many members contribute to the music, but only the singer writes lyrics. I you want to "learn" how to write lyrics, then ...


10

A very common way to notate lyrics where pitch doesn't matter is to just use a single line staff to note the rhythmic hits. In this system everything is the same except there are not distinct pitches per note. Here's an example of this system used to notate The Aggressive Bee: ]1


9

I'm afraid the short answer is no. It may be possible if you could find an instrumental version Load both the completed track and the instrumental into a DAW and make sure they line up (I.e. listen to them at the same time). Then mute the instrumental until the point you wish to change, and at that point mute the original track. (I.E. switch to ...


7

There are several different kinds of stress in music. Meter (lyrical) is the stress added by accents (real or implied) in the lyric. It's important to remember that meter, as it was used in writing, actually gave rhythmic form to both poetry and prose. In the case of music, the lyric may not always be delivered in a way which stresses its own meter. In one ...


6

Perhaps the main thing to consider here is expectations. If you lived in a world where all musical lines had note starts (or other 'events') that only fell on the strong beats, then a vocal line that behaved otherwise might - at least on first listening - seem out of time. We (or at least most of us) don't live in that world though - for example, there are ...


6

If you play and sing it yourself, then it's a cover. If you merely use editing tools to change it around, then it's a remix. A remix generally doesn't include a new performance or recording, it's merely editing and changing what has already been recorded. A cover is a new recording or performance of a song written by someone else, or sometimes it's a new ...


5

The best explanation of the difference between lyrics and poetry I've ever heard was in a broadcast of a talk at the Dramatists Guild by Stephen Sondheim; there's a transcript of it here. It would also be worth looking at "Notes on Lyrics," an essay by Sondheim's mentor Oscar Hammerstein, of which you can get a copy here. EDIT: I've posted screenshots of ...


5

I took a course on Coursera for songwriting and the emphasis was lyrics and fitting them to rhythms. Pat Pattison is an author with great advice for the lyric writing point of view. http://www.patpattison.com/


5

As pointed out by Killian Forth, "parody", in the original musicological sense, should cover this -- initially musical parody was merely the resuse of musical content in another work, and didn't have the comical connotations that it does today. The reason why the lyrics can be exchanged is because the two songs have the same (poetic) metre. There are many ...


5

Wow - that song has a ton of words! And as you said, there is not really a chorus that repeats over and over. This one would be a challenge for anyone and it will take some persistent practice. Storing these lyrics into long term memory will best be accomplished by spacing the learning process over a longer period of time rather than cramming it in in a ...


5

Most of your name suggestions aren't wrong. Chords and lyrics sheet -> This seems a bit long, but it is accurate, since it describes exactly what we are looking at Chord charts [with lyrics]-> Short and to the point. Music chord tabs -> Tabs seems wrong here, because you don't include a tablature in your app. Lead sheet -> Like Tim said, the app isn't a ...


5

A few thoughts come to mind: 1.) Write every day. Not just every day for a year, but every day, forever. Gershwin would write a melody every day, knowing that he’d only end up using 1 melody out of 100. 2.) Don’t judge what you write too soon. What matters most at the outset is creating. After creation, then measure if it fits your vision. If it doesn’t, ...


4

Just to add to the great post from RC - there's lots of imagery in that song. In cases like that, one thing I sometimes do is visualise the scene that the song is describing. Then when singing the song, all I have to do is get the picture in my head again, say what's going on in the scene, and out come the lyrics (hopefully!)


4

Poetry, Rhymes and Lyrics are all different, the only similarity is that they should hit an emotion somewhere. Lyrics have a lot to do with story telling and sometime rhymes, but most importantly how rhythmically the syllables fit into each musical measure. Lyrics might rhyme, but the best way to make them feel musical is to manipulate each syllable to fit ...


4

I've certainly seen some notation being used for chords that can be used for lyrics, too. Basically, you add the bars, and then you divide each bar into an equal number of intervals, usually 2, 4 or 8. If then a syllable is longer that this basic unit, you add -- after it. To give an example: | Yes-ter-day -- | -- | -- -- All my | trou-bles seemed so | far ...


4

I am not sure there is actually a name for these impromptu embellishments or an official term to describe them. In some cases you could describe it as ad-lib - but that's not an official music term. Obviously in a live show there is often a situational variation or embellishment to the normal lyrics or an unrehearsed, ad-lib or spontaneous ornamental ...


4

Yes, exactly the same. This is true for sheet music: Chord/lyric sheets: As well as tabs and other forms.


4

There have been various fashions over the years. There seems no justification for syllabic beaming in a modern edition. I sometimes, semi-jocularly, wonder if the practice might be responsible for singers' notorious inability to count! This is what Gould has to say...


4

A quick and dirty way of doing this is to put your music and lyrics into variables like this: musicA={c d e f | g a b c} lyricsA=\lyricmode {do re mi fa so la ti do} musicB={c b a g | f e d c} lyricsB=\lyricmode {do ti la so fa mi re do} << \new Voice = "melody" \relative c' { \musicA \musicB } \new Lyrics \lyricsto "melody" { \lyricsA \lyricsB } >&...


4

Odes to someone unspecified by name (if not by profession or by pulchritude) date at least to 1914. Titles of World War I songs include "Oh, You Beautiful Doll," "Your King and Country Wants You," "Don't Bite the Hand That's Feeding You," "Pack Up Your Troubles," "Keep the Home Fires Burning." Odes in general go back to ancient Greece and have been ...


4

Possibly of Canadian origin, Red River Valley was nonetheless very popular in the US. It was established in Canada by 1896 and may have been composed in the 1870s. It begins "from this valley they say you are going...." Stephen Foster's Beautiful Dreamer probably dates from 1862. The Star Spangled Banner begins "o say, can you see...?" Another answer ...


4

A poetic foot need not have an even number of syllables, and a poetic line need not have an even number of feet. Furthermore, in some styles of poetry, if not most, it is not uncommon to vary the rhythm somewhat by inserting a three-syllable foot in a two-syllable meter or vice versa. A famous example, set many times to music, most famously by Schubert, is ...


3

I just wanted to add that depending on the kind of music you're playing, you will always have to adapt your texts, first, to the audience listening to your music, but also to the groove and the melody itself. So there is not any "miracle recipe" for writing lyrics, as there is no miracle recipe for making THE perfect sound : everyone is doing this in his own ...


3

This is a trademark of Randy Newman, purposely mismatching a happy tune to sad/nasty lyrics. This isn't necessarily done with major/minor keys. For example, "In Germany before the war" has a beautiful tune and seems really sensitive, but the lyrics are about a child murderer. Technically, matching musical content to lyrics is called 'prosody'; normally, ...


3

It will be beneficial to learn some music theory. In that way you'll be able to identify repeating patterns (like the II-V-I chord progression). It is easier to memorize larger chunks, so learning how to identify patterns by e.g. chord function should make it easier.


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