13

The star in the middle of the staff actually points us to a footnote given at the end of this first book. In my edition (Boosey & Hawkes), the footnote states: The rhythmic feeling of the suspensions should be emphasized by some energetic movement such as tapping with the foot in the places marked by rhythmic signatures between the staves. From a ...


7

If I understand you right, mathematicians and scientists call that the period. If some thing (such as a drum line) consists of a pattern which repeats in a cycle, then the length of that pattern is the period. So, for example: KICK KICK KICK KICK KICK KICK KICK KICK ... - The period of this drum line is 1 beat. kick SNARE kick SNARE kick SNARE kick SNARE .....


6

There's nothing wrong with what's in the picture. All major subdivisions are respected so one can play it at sight. The tied Cs make it clear that there is a note held from beat 2 to beat 3.


6

It's a bit simpler than that. Syncopation is accenting the off beat, especially accenting in between beats. For example, "Superbad" or "Mother Popcorn" by James Brown. A single rhythm can be syncopated. It's just an unusual stress pattern. Polyrhythm is playing two rhythms at once. For instance, on the piano, playing straight eighth notes (quavers) on the ...


5

Meter is the regular, hierarchical pattern of beats. Syncopation occurs when something in the music creates a competing pattern of beats, typically when these beats are displaced from the overall meter. For instance, instead of 1 & 2 & 3 &, which is the overall meter in 3/4, an example of syncopation would be the displaced 1 & 2 & 3 &;...


4

I don't really know much about piano but what I do on the guitar is to listen to a drum beat (usually latin or jazz for complexity) and then I replicate the beat in my strum or by playing single notes. When I get good and clean at it, I look for another beat and work on that. I have found that it helps me a lot when it comes time to improvise. I have a ...


4

This seems pretty good: The FreeDictionary by Farlex, Encyclopedia: Syncopation Syncopation (sĭng'kəpā`shən, sĭn'–) [New Gr.,=cut off ], in music, the accentuation of a beat that normally would be weak according to the rhythmic division of the measure. Although the normally strong beat is not usually effaced by the process, there are ...


3

As a matter of fact, Baroque music does sometimes get a half-bar "out-of-phase" with the barlines. I've addressed this phenomenon in a previous answer here: Can you introduce fugue themes in the middle of a measure? If so, how?. In fact, just last night, I was noticing this happens in the final movement of the 3rd Brandenburg Concerto. After two bars of ...


3

If you want an un-measured 'fast' gracenote, use an acciaccatura (the one with a slash) rather than an appoggiatura. Apart from that, your notation appears clear. I don't understand your statement 'it's about the rhythm not the exact timing'. Rhythm IS timing. You've put the note at a precise rhythmic position. If that's where you want it to go, good. ...


3

One term that might fit is "grouping." In studies of rhythm and meter, we refer to grouping as a hierarchical structure of units created by various means within the music. We could say that the grouping of the disco line is one beat, or that the rock line has a duple grouping. This term is used constantly in studies of rhythm and meter, and it's especially ...


3

You could borrow a term from poetry: metrical foot.


3

some things that may help: slow it down (I know you said you tried this, but slow it down until you can play it. it may need to get ridiculously slow but you will not be able to play it until you can play it slowly. if you need to break it down until the 8th note pace is 5 seconds apart do it...beat 1: play and sing a note, thinK about beat 1&, hold ...


3

Ragtimes are notable for the pianists left hand pattern of playing a low chord root followed by the offbeat 8th note full chord voicing. This creates an "ump-pah" type of 2/4 rhythm that underlies the right hand playing complex syncopations on top to make the music an early form of piano solo dance music. Stride pianists become staples of New Orleans ...


2

Syncopation isn't essentially a multiple-player thing, though in a band some players may be laying down 'four on the floor' while another plays syncopated rhythms over this steady beat. Easier to illustrate than to explain: Polyrhythm is basically what you said. 'Micro polyrhythms' are much more common than whole sections though. Wheras suncopation is ...


2

First - don't worry about it. Syncopation is a constant feature of popular (and other) music. You'd almost be surprised if everyone DID follow a plain 'four on the floor' rhythm! What's so important about labelling a rhythm 'syncopated' or not? But if you want to, tap your foot to the music. Where a prominent rhythm in the music aligns with your foot ...


2

Try "Down beat rate". In the software, put text with a dropdown list as shown below. Down beat rate : (1|2|3|4|...) ( with default value as number of beats per measure) In help page/notes, add something like this. "Down beat rate : Down beat at every (1|2|3|4)beat(s)"


2

As I said in my comment: make the middle of the bar visible. But ths will be difficult in a 3/8 like this: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Syncopation


2

Hearing bars 13-19 as shifted by half a bar may be due to the prominent low C's on the offbeats. But Bach rarely plays games of rhythmic ambiguity like, say, Beethoven. More important is to preserve the rhythmic structure of the melodic phrases. Bars 1-8 hammer home a phrase that starts just after the downbeat. If you hear the bars as written, then when ...


1

I would think of it as written. The 16th notes at the end of m.14 are a pick-up into the next bar, which would not really make sense if the previous three beats were a 3/4 measure, making the last beat of m.14 a downbeat. If you are having a hard time hearing the groupings, I recommend that you read and play through this with the 8th note as the beat. This ...


1

Start using a metronome! But set it in several different ways. In 4/4 time, it's simple to set it so that each click is on each beat - and particularly useful if it has a ping on beat one. That will help you play on the beats, obviously. Doing that will also help you play off the beats - with the 'and' being the silent part in between clicks. Try setting ...


1

Your anticipated chord changes work fine; it is the melody that needs work. There's a very useful principle that goes like this: put important notes (pitches) on important beats of the bar. Important notes are notes from the chord and important beats are 1 and 3 or the first note in a pair of quavers (eighth notes). 'Unimportant' notes include notes from ...


1

Syncopation: playing on the offbeat. On the ‘and’ of “1-and-and-3-and-4-and”. Polyrhythms/cross rhythms: when two lines (either the right and left hands of a piano piece or multiple lines in an orchestral score for example) play with a different “feel” in time signature. One might be playing triplets whilst the other plays straight.


1

It is an emphasis on the weak part of beats, the weak part of the beat differs from Time Signature to Time Signature. So for instance... In 4/4 time the weak part is the 2nd and 4th beat and every second part of the subdivision of the beat, So when you have quavers every second quaver of the crotchet beat. In Compound Time Signatures you have three parts ...


1

Structurally, ragtime tends to be fairly conservative. A lot of ragtime is 0-1 strains away from fitting the classic rag form: I-AA-BB-A-CC-DD This is derived from Sousa-like regimental march form, where the introduction, A strain, and B strain are in the home key, while the C and D strains are in the subdominant. One example of a rag that is pretty much ...


1

I would not call any of your examples syncopation. Although the examples you point to is a note on the weak beat, it is still on a beat. Syncopation is when the the start of the notes played is not on the ground beat. For example if it starts with an eight rest and then quarter notes where each hang over to the next beat, and finally resolves via an eight ...


1

There are a couple ways to practice this. The first is to write out melodic lines you like, add syncopation, and practice the syncopated version. For example, if you're improvising in C and you play a blues-y lick this: Then you might try moving the first note back an eighth, so that your phrase starts a little early: The syncopation can be added to the ...


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