8

I suspect that at the root of the problem is the fact that when singing into the vocoder, your brain doesn't get the expected feedback (the natural sound of your voice) and therefore instinctively tries to push harder on the voice. For example, you know what happens when you wear enclosed headphones and someone talks to you -- you want to reply, but you don'...


7

As much as it bothers you, he's actually naturally doing exactly what he should be doing. I'll explain in a moment. Changing voices for boys who sing is primarily difficult for two reasons: the physiological aspect and the psychological aspect. Because many books are written on this subject, I will very briefly address each citing information from a text ...


5

It probably has to do with the nature of the context. Many times jumping into a dissonance, even if you were just singing the pitch, will cause you to second-guess your concept of what pitch is coming next. Harmonically, pitches can function differently based on context. B at the top of a e chord is different from B in the middle of a Gchord. Technically, ...


5

Bear in mind I started my singing long before the ability to tape yourself was as simple as holding your phone in front of your face, so this might feel a little...ancient ;) You have to develop a sense of what you sound like when recorded... without listening as you record. That's the only way to gauge 'how you sing'. Even with headphones, you cannot ...


4

Some points I want to hit right up front here (and then I'll get very wordy w/ the actual exercises). As you can tell, this is a subject near & dear to my heart. Good blend between voice parts is actually (mostly) about good blend between individuals. Once a person has decided that they'll pay attention to good blend, then they tend to bring that ...


4

This is a question where even professional choir directors and singers can't agree on. Some do quite long vocal excersises (sometimes with all kinds of gymnastics) and some just start to sing. The excersises are not so much about not wrecking voices but more about getting in the right set of mind for reheasing and 'tuning' your vocal 'instrument'. It allows ...


4

Resonance is genre independent. The only time one might not opt for maximum or at least controlled resonance is if they have commercially valuable tone already. Think Louis Armstrong. The techniques your teacher is going through with you will likely help you sing freely openly and easily. However if you want to sing pop, as you get more advanced, you ...


4

I've seen people misidentify the octaves before on this type of question, so be certain that you have the correct notes (C6 is the "Soprano High C", and should sound really high). If you have the correct octave numbers, proceed. It's definitely not impossible for males to sing C6. Michael Jackson in Smooth Criminal, anyone? Prince? Freddie Mercury's done it ...


4

How do you get to Carnegie hall? Practice!!!! You stated that you just found your "Head Voice". Yes you are tiring yourself out. Its something new that your throat will have to deal with. Over time you will develop more control, sustain, and range. BEWARE however, Pro's mess there voices up all the time from over-practice. So don't burn up your vocal chords ...


4

It's probably that you need practice focusing on voice intonation and accuracy. Is there a way to improve my pitch recognition for my own voice? Or is it just a matter of improving vocal accuracy? I think it's both. I'd try predictive ear training, which is awesome for your voice intonation, improvisation, and general musicality. The idea is to sing an ...


4

1) You will have more than one passaggi. The orientation of those passaggi will determine your fach, ultimately. 2) Physically speaking, you're still not 100% developed. If you're serious about becoming a classically trained, bel canto singer, you should be concentrating on developing your technique. I recommend reading a bit of Richard Miller ($20 tops), ...


4

You might be getting into your fry register on the low notes, depending on how low you are trying to go. The fry register can be bad for the voice (damaging to the vocal cords.) Try looking up some videos on the fry register to get a better idea if that's what's happening. The pain may have nothing to do with what you're doing in your high range at all.


3

A convenient way of measuring this is with what we call "octave designation." In typical octave designation, what we call "middle C" is C4. An octave higher is C5, an octave lower is C3, etc. Your low F (first fret low E string) is an F2, and your high D (third fret B string) is a D4 (thus just above middle C). This falls almost exactly into the bass range (...


3

Another answer states "after the hormonal development in his body changes his voice range into the lifelong adult range": that's dangerously misleading. The male (and to quite a lesser degree the female) voice change is a significant change of the whole larynx. As a sort of imagery, consider it like a molting insect that's soft initially and hardens out ...


3

If you're already taking singing lessons then I would suggest the best person to ask is your singing teacher. She has a distinct advantage over someone on the internet in that she's actually heard your voice (and also has years of training and experience teaching). It sounds like you have a clear idea of the sound you want to achieve and a pretty clear ...


3

You don't get high notes by bending your head up, or low notes by bending it down! So, in itself, there's no reason why limited mobility such as you describe should affect singing.


3

It's a bit of both. You have what you have, genetically, and some people have a great range of 4 octaves (rarish), compared to a lot who have a decent two octave range. The latter is enough for most stuff, and changing key helps! With some training, another couple of tones at one end (or both) is possible, but quality of voice can suffer at each end. ...


3

Long story short: if you live in an area with strong Indian culture and are very familiar with Indian Classical music, start there. If you just think Indian music is cool, start somewhere else. Either one is going to provide you with a lot of the fundamentals of vocal training (breath support, pitch, posture, etc.) Anything that doesn't overlap between the ...


3

There are so many things that you can do wrong as a singer. Only a qualified vocal teacher listening to you physically will be able to tell you exactly what you are doing wrong, and how to work on your problems. You need to take some lessons.


3

Many factors can affect this. Low-grade inflammation is among them. If you suffer from respiratory allergies, even mild enough that you notice no other symptoms, you may find that the higher notes become difficult or unavailable. Even lack of sleep can affect your range. One thing to be careful of is gastric acid reflux. Singers may be especially ...


2

What I would suggest is to try it home on your own, using a piano or guitar or some other instrument, so you can clearly hear the note you are singing. If you are trying to sing without some accompaniment, you are bound to get some mistakes at first. Also, when there are many voices singing with you, you might get confused and this might be why you cannot ...


2

What exercise would help me get a full tone on every note? Vocal exercises specific to full tone would mostly include laryngeal position and resonance. I would define full tone as a healthy, resonant, non strained quality. There are a variety of online resources specific to a lower laryngeal position as well as proper abduction and adduction in vocal ...


2

This is very subjective. The quality of a particular teaching method is only one factor. It may be very good quality but not necessarily suit all students, or teachers, for that matter. Teachers of experience will have developed their own strategies (hopefully) and so be able to adapt to the individual pupils. So there may not even be what you call a '...


2

Okay, there are a few things to unpack here: Your age. The voice doesn’t really mature until people are in their 30’s, and will continue to mature as they age. One of the biggest issues with young vocalists is that they see and hear so much garbage out there and attempt to sing far beyond their vocal maturity. If you are younger than your 30’s then your ...


2

I’m not sure if this will help, but maybe also playing the exercise where you’re singing and an octave lower could help. That’s what my voice coach used to tell me. As for the actually excercises, “mama made me mash my m and ms.” Is a nice practice that also helps with consonants. Do re mi da so da mi re do. Hope that helps!


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