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2

I would suggest that you try out the tuning, and see what happens. You don't even need to do this on a real instrument, you can just work it out on paper. One immediate problem I see is that the open E chord gets a lot messier. In standard tuning: E But in EADGCE: %0/0.2/2.2/3.1/1.4/4.0/0 That E-shape chord is an absolute staple, and now you can't ...


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Stanley Jordan famously tunes his guitar in 4ths, i.e. EADGCF, which makes chord and scale shapes the same all over the fretboard. In the second video linked below, at around 13 minutes in, he explains the pros and cons of this tuning. He mentioned somewhere else that it took him about one month to become completely familiar with the new tuning after ...


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Well, just for a start, in standard tuning you have an inverted major triad on the D/G/B strings, and an inverted minor triad on G/B/E. This already makes many things easier. Given that the most common scales that we use are themselves non-symmetrical, there is really no reason to think that tuning the guitar symmetrically will make anything easier. It will ...


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I have answered a similar question in the past. I do not believe that what others consider better tuning is really better. Whether for ergonomic or other reasons what you think is better is based on what you play. A lot of older classical guitar music plays very easily on the current standard tuning and I'd have to guess that over the centuries tuning ...


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I am familiar with 'Nashville Strung' or 'High Strung' guitar situations, but not Nashville tuning. In Nashville Strung, a standard six-string guitar is strung with the typical three light-guage (un-wound) on the bottom three strings, and the three upper (normally wound, heavier strings) are replaced with the same three light-gauge strings. This creates ...


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I think it's worth mentioning here that a major reason that guitarists and other stringed instruments use an alternate tuning is to accommodate a singer's voice. Though I believe you are referring specifically to instrumental music given your example, this fact also supports the case that D# tuning (usually called Eb tuning) is not that rare at all, at least ...


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I can't speak to the logistics of connecting your particular keyboard. But one piece of software that is useful for this (and has been around forever) is Scala. Depending on the abilities of your equipment, it can export tuning files in various formats or use MIDI pitch bends to allow real-time performance on an instrument that doesn't natively support ...


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Cubase has its Micro Tuner in the MIDI Effects section. I'm not clear if different tunings can be set in different octaves. From the description I suspect not, but I'll check when I get to my 'big' computer where Cubase lives! https://steinberg.help/cubase_plugin_reference/v9/en/_shared/topics/plug_ref/micro_tuner_r.html


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