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1

22.4/25.5=88% scale length. tuning up 4/3 requires 16/9 tension at the same scale length. 56% more tension. I wouldn't do it. I wouldn't worry about tearing the top off the guitar (if this is a half size guitar, it has less perimeter about the top, and less strength), but I don't worry about anything. I also have a couple of tenor guitars with broken necks. ...


-2

Augmented and diminished tunings are regular and form major or minor chords, E2 G#2 C3 E3 G#3 C4 or E2 G2 Bb2 Db3 E3 G3.


4

;tldr: You can't get major or minor chords in a tuning where all intervals between consecutive strings are the same, but you CAN get other nice sounds. As previous answers have pointed out, getting all the open strings to sound a major or minor chord while keeping the intervals between strings the same is impossible. The intervals between consecutive notes ...


6

Is [...open tuning...the intervals between strings are the same...when played open gives a major or minor chord...] actually possible? Categorically, no. In terms of "stacked" intervals major and minor triads are not "regular" interval stacks. Those chords alternate major and minor thirds. Additionally when the chord root is repeated at ...


5

This is probably not what you are looking for, but: If you have the same diatonic interval (e.g. a third or a sixth), you could have a "regular" tuning that gives open triads. Say we pick the key of G: Thirds: C - E - G - B - D - F♯ – Contains both C major, G major, E minor and B minor triads. Sixths: F♯ - D - B - G - E - C – Contains the same, ...


7

Regular tuning gives P4 between all strings except 3rd-2nd, which is M3. Basic major chords are made up from M3, m3 and P4, while minor chord are similar, but m3, M3 and P4. Thus the answer is no, as there can't be a mix between regular/major or regular/minor. There could be say, bottom 3 give major, top three minor, but then you've lost the regular tuning. ...


3

In most orchestras nowdays there would be enough players with either a C extension or a 5 string bass to be able to provide the lower octave. You'd probably get away with just one on the lower octave even in quite a large orchestra. Failing that, as Aaron has already answered, lowering the E string is not at all uncommon, although I personally would find it ...


7

TL;DR The score generally leaves plenty of space to detune and retune the E string, and there are many E naturals that would clearly be better played open. There is also no scordatura indication in the score. According to Jason Heath's Double Bass Blog the first bass extension dates back to the 1880s, so hypothetically could have been used for Das Rheingold, ...


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