New answers tagged

2

I'll address some related points, that mostly can help you to answer your question yourself: I've let the bass aside myself for like 10 years, and picked it again when I broke 2 fingers, for re-education. I suggest you take advantage first of that pause so that it's easier to loose the bad habits if you had some. Muting strings you don't play is very ...


1

I was away from singing for about 15 years. It took me 2 years to "not suck" and about 5 to be as good or better than I had been. In that time I practiced multiple times a week, was 2 bands, wrote many songs (with others and alone) and was going to regular jam sessions. The bands and jam sessions were the motivation for the practice. So, I would recommend ...


4

Welcome to the site Henry. I don't think re-learning an instrument will be very different from the first time you learned it. You will have the benefit of having some knowledge but also have the disadvantage of having some old bad habits. Just like learning anything else it is good to: set short term goals set long term goals make a routine evaluate and ...


4

One thing that happens when I don't use skills that I have developed in my life is that they seem to become less natural to me, less automatic, and slower. But I don't completely lose the skills altogether. I still retain a lot of the knowledge and understanding that I accumulated from my previous experience and it can help me move more quickly to get back ...


1

I think it's worth mentioning here that a major reason that guitarists and other stringed instruments use an alternate tuning is to accommodate a singer's voice. Though I believe you are referring specifically to instrumental music given your example, this fact also supports the case that D# tuning (usually called Eb tuning) is not that rare at all, at least ...


2

You will surely remember the journey you made when you did start with playing e-bass. You could write a selection of your most favorite pieces in progression of difficulty - this may be about the same series like you learnt to play them. Then you can recover all difficulties you had in the past but you will play them diagonal through and you will find out ...


11

All good advice in the other answers. The thing I’d add is, have a reason to play regularly. What that reason is will be down to you. Join a band, go to a regular jam session, be working towards your next exam or lesson, if you’re religious join the band at your church. What exactly it is you do is actually fairly unimportant at this stage - the key is ...


4

Buying a new bass will not likely fix anything. You cannot "fix" lack of technique by any other method than practice, practice, practice. One factor is how long did you stay away from the instrument. I don't think you stated that. Your skills are perishable. Just like being in shape by going to the gym. You can't get yourself in great shape, be a ...


4

I'm personally a big fan of music grades. I'd suggest finding a grade to start at (maybe grade 3-4 for you since that's when it starts to be more than just bare-bones basics) and working your way through them until you find a part where you really need to practice. I'd personally recommend the Rockschool exams if you're into playing more contemporary music. ...


2

As a follow up to this (in case anyone searching here ever experiences the same issue,) the culprit was indeed the input jack, as suggested by Tim. However, the issue wasn't with the switch clearing after taking out my instrument cable... After a bit more prodding as suggested by PeterJ in the comments: @TimBurnett-Bassist you won't get a reading at the ...


3

If you're are talking about such as a Rickenbacker neck, they actually have both - 2 truss rods, both dual action - the rods are U-shaped & push as well as pull on the rear of the aluminium bar in the headstock. pic: Haze Guitars If the neck is level [ie not twisted], adjust both by the same number of flats, one at a time, left a flat, right a flat [if ...


2

An Epiphone acoustic, MIJ, which I bought second-hand 50 yrs ago, has never needed touching. My Tele - '76 - the same. A Shergold, ('78) which was played on hundreds of gigs for 25 yrs+ again, no problem. So while there is a very slight chance that 'creep' might affect a guitar, so far, it's not any of mine - of which I have many older editions - including ...


1

In theory yes, in practise no. Case in point… My 1964 Strat & 1976 Rikki 4001. I adjusted both neck truss-rods when I got them, simply because I didn't like how they were set before. They haven't needed touching since. The Strat I did in the mid 90's, the Rikki in 1990. So in practise, I'd call 30 years pretty stable.


Top 50 recent answers are included