14

Although the two terms are often conflated, and although there are plenty of situations where the difference isn't noticeable, the intended difference is that portamento is a relatively quick pitch slide between all or most of the notes during a melody or melody section. The pitch slide tends to come only at the very end of the note, more or less during the ...


11

The glissando symbol, by default, means a white-key gliss, regardless of key signature. There is a common piano technique by which you play a gliss with one hand and then strike the final note with the other. This has the added benefit of the final note being accented, which will also allow it to sustain more. Without any other contextual information being ...


10

Am I supposed to glissando on the white keys through A and then hit and hold the B flat at the end? I'm not a piano theory expert, but I would say yes. Performing the glissando across the white keys gives you a major scale (more or less); this is the "sound" I typically associate with a glissando in music. If you move across just the black keys, you ...


5

I’m assuming that everywhere you said A and E you actually mean Ab and Eb, right? The answer definitely isn’t c), glissando should only be used for sweeps across all strings, but there’s no pedal position that can produce exclusively 2 pitches. In fact, out of all 2,187 possible pedal combinations, the fewest distinct pitch classes possible is 4, and only 42 ...


4

Personally I choose to use my thumb nail (going down at least, sometimes a finger nail going up depending on what's easiest, but always the nail.) This hurts to start with, but before long you'll get used to it. The "down then up" Glissando in Rhapsody in Blue for instance I find easier with the thumb going down, and a finger on the way up - when it's just ...


4

Glissando is a discrete portamento whereas portamento is a continuous glissando.


4

Irrespective of singing, a glissando indicates that specific notes (whether specified or not) should be played or performed. For example, if there is a perfect-fifth leap with a port. indication, the performer should play/sing all of the chromatic notes in between unless otherwise indicated. A portamento indicates that no specific pitches are necessary ...


4

A piano gliss is usually on white notes, with the back of the middle finger. Where it needs a specific 'landing point', and it's a black note, it's easy to turn the first finger onto it. Sometimes 'black note gliss' is requested in the notation. Sometimes a player decides a black note gliss would be appropriate. It tends to be very recognizably a ...


4

I think you want to turn the cadenza off earlier, so change lines 22-24 from: c4\glissando \hideNotes c,,4 \unHideNotes \cadenzaOff to: c4\glissando \hideNotes \cadenzaOff c,,4 \unHideNotes This will give you something like this:


3

Beyond the traditional way of starting-slow-and-increasing-tempo, you can also use other tactics as well: study which fingering best adapts to your hands. Little hands have different needs compared to big hands. emphasize first note in three or four groups. After reaching a smooth play, emphasize second note, and so on. divide the scale in three- or four-...


3

The above answer is not right; the spacing is incorrect, and it will not align properly if you have other instruments in parallel staves. This is because the cadenza makes the 3/4 bar have an extra crotched (invisible or not) What you want is a (/an invisible) grace note at the end of the bar. So instead replace lines 20-26 with: \afterGrace c4 \...


3

There isn't really much of a difference. When you shift slide on the guitar, you are trying to get the note as fast as you can while still making it noticeable that you shifted your hand by hitting the notes in between. Shift slides are generally rather fast while a glissando can be drawn out. Glissandos on guitar (and other instruments too such as piano ...


3

While I don't say that it is easy (and I'm not even going to try to do it myself), you'll notice that all the notes are on white keys. The usual way to play these is to play between two keys with one finger, striking the two notes at once. (Prokofiev loved to do horrible things like this.) As A. Jiménez says, it's not a glissando; you can't do this by ...


2

Well, it's not a glissando. That passage mimics in some way the effect of a glissando, but definitely, it's not. One way of percieve it, it's that not all notes are double notes, but there's an alternation between single and double notes, which makes it impossible to play using glissando technique. Now, how is she able to play that passage? Marta Argerich ...


2

If you play a glissando remember to relax your hand. A glissando should not cause any great pain. Even if you were playing in a large concert hall, it should not be the case that you hold your fingers so stiff that you have to make the glissando so loud for the audience. Loosen up and practice a glissando with just one finger even by just using your index ...


2

'Stopping' on french horn is when you put your hand in the bell. This adjusts the pitch of the note and also has a muting effect. I am not an expert on this, however i found a good article on Wikipedia: This is the act of fully closing off the bell of the instrument with either the right hand or a special stopping mute. This results in producing a ...


2

One way that I actually found useful on piano once is to start with "infinite tempo", which basically means just playing a chord. Then you try to add a tiny little space between them. On many instruments this method does not work, but on piano it does.


2

On the piano, a glissando is possible on either the white or black keys. In the latter case, it would be an ascending or descending pentatonic scale. I use the back of my fingers. It never hurt me. On the harp, it is different. The strings can be set by means of the pedals so that a glissando can be done on any scale, diminished-seventh chord, the two whole-...


1

After some research I found what might be the answer: Slow Cluster Glissando


1

According to Piston (Orchestration) & Blatter (Instrumentation and Orchestration), the default manner of playing a chord for orchestral harp arpeggiated and any annotation to the chord changes the speed of the arpeggiation: the arpeggio line denoting a longer, exaggerated arpeggiation, while a square bracket denotes no arpeggiation. So without any ...


1

Aric's answer is mostly correct, except that l.v. stands for laissez vibrer (French), strictly speaking. In this context, it simply means to allow the strings to ring for the duration of the glissando (and perhaps for longer afterwards too, if indicated). I've not seen n.v. before, but I would definitely interpret this as Aric did - as an explicit ...


1

The vibration of your vocal chords is what creates sound when you’re singing. The more quickly your vocal cords vibrate, the higher the pitch of the produced note. It requires less energy to slow down than to speed up (to a point). Think of it this way: if you are jogging at a leisurely pace, which requires more energy—jogging slower or jogging more quickly?...


1

I'm afraid I have to take the skeptical view and say that Baroque musicians chose the most suitable symbol for the job, which it turned out the medievals had chosen eight centuries earlier. The quilisma (and other ornamental neumes, such as the oriscus and trigon) are found only in the oldest traditions of neumatic notation for monophonic liturgical chant, ...


1

No, this is not an accidental coincidence: There is enough evidence from your wiki site to answer all other questions in your post with yes! The quilisma and the schleifer are both a graphic sign to illustrate a glissando in singing or instrumental music. As it was used in the notation of Gregorian chant it will be obvious that it was took over in the ...


1

Given the recording, it seems clear that the gliss markings are intended to convey "portamento with vibrato" -- this seems like a reasonable way to notate it, especially if there were footnotes or similar indicating that this is the effect. To me, the notation of "de-ba-ta" looks good; the "ba" syllable is a pick-up note leading into the ta syllable. ...


1

When using "Czardas" as an example for portamento identity, it's important to note that the interpretive portion of the piece is heavily rubato, disregarding time/tempo and leaving much to expression. A clear definition of portamento (as I perform it, attacking a note and sliding to another with no discernable voicings in between,and almost immediately ...


1

Glissando is going through intermediate pitches musically. Portamento "carries" one pitch to another pitch: there is no interruption in tone and style and no "musical concept" of intermediate notes even though the execution might not be able to switch pitches instantly. It's pretty much the same as a slur over a larger interval. If you map this to a ...


1

In singing, Portamento is a style, Glissando a technique. Neither are likely to be heard as a distinct chromatic (or otherwise) scale. On a harp, Glissando is a scale. On trombone it's a continuous smear. The terms mean different things in different contexts.


1

You may use the nail, but fingertips also work for a (downward) louder glissando.


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