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8

This is known as a Courtesy Accidental. The purpose is to clearly indicate to the reader that a note that was given an accidental in a previous measure will return to the pitch indicated in the key signature in this occurrence, which is especially helpful for sight reading. It is called a Courtesy Accidental because the convention is that an accidental ...


7

The top staves are "correct" for a slur, the bottom staves are correct for a phrasing slur. For music like violin music, this difference is more poignant than for piano since a slur has separate technical meaning as a bowing direction instruction (which implies legato but the legato can be dissolved with tenuto or staccato marks) while a phrasing slur is ...


6

Control points can be overridden. The pairs here are x,y coordinates: \version "2.19.80" % ... r4 \once\override Slur.extra-offset = #'(0 . 6) \once\override Slur.control-points = #'((1 . -6) (4 . 1) (13 . -6) (18.5 . 0.5)) c4^(^\pp g' % etc and give the image below which can obviously be improved with more ...


6

It's an accent that applies to both notes. In the Peters edition (2007, ed. Leslie Howard), bars 748 and 752, a footnote makes this explicit: Liszt's special accent requires a stress on all the notes under the symbol. In recordings you can often hear the accent implemented as an (extremely) momentary ritardando, as well as the usual increase in loudness....


5

The textbook Music Notation: A Manual of Modern Practice by Gardner Read answers your first question as follows: When slurs are placed over a passage that ends in a tied note, the slur sign should extend as far as the second note of the tie, rather than end of the first note. The principle involved should be obvious; the breath of the singer or wind ...


5

Although not applicable to the piano piece in the question (the use of which is in the accepted answer), but to clarify for people that may see a similar mark used in student pieces, who may otherwise be confused: In some instructional method books and corresponding pieces, the mark is used to indicate a half step in a new scale or fingering position. ...


4

On many instruments, slurs indicate a particular technique. For wind instruments, it means to play without tonguing. For orchestral strings, it means to play in one bow motion. In these cases, it's critically important for slurs to be in the right places. Outside of that, I think it's simply tradition to use a slur to visually group the grace note in with ...


3

how do I move from the A in the first bar to the G in the second bar You don't. There is only 1 G note. Simply slur from A to G, and then hold the G for 3 beats. Why are there 2 G note heads? Because notes can't go over a barline, so the composer had to notate it with 2 note heads connected by a tie. This is just a convention to enhance readability. ...


3

To me, the easiest change is to include \once \override Slur #'direction = #DOWN immediately preceding the \acciaccatura. This produces: \version "2.19.82" line = \relative c'' { \key g \major \time 3/4 << { \once \override Slur #'direction = #DOWN \acciaccatura d8-4 <c a>4-2-1 <g b>4 r4 | } \\ { e,...


3

Your best guide would actually be to listen to recordings & read the writings of acknowledged Beethoven specialists. That said, analysing the lines in the right hand provides some insight. If we remove the octave transpositions & the rests we have this progression in the 4 bars you provided: So you can see from what's happening in the ...


3

Because the Eb3 is in a second voice. In the handbook they explain how to use multiple voices in a staff: https://musescore.org/en/handbook/voices Now TBH, but I'm definitely no expert, I'd find it easier to read if the first Eb3 would be notated in the second voice too, since it alerts me something's coming up, and also since I won't need to hide the ...


3

Use \laissezVibrer instead of ~. Cf the notation manual.


3

It's not always easy to tell, but here we are definitely talking about a tie. How to distinguish? A tie is sole functional and can only connect equal pitches (there is the tricky exception of a tie connecting enharmonically equivalent notes in a modulation but the execution would be to hold the note without noticeable intonation correction). Does that ...


3

Yes, it's a tie. You have to play the C once and hold it for 6 quarters. To tell the difference, keep in mind that slurs are used between different notes and ties are used between the same notes. For instance:


3

The first arrow is tying into the eighth note. The quarter notes at the beginning of the phrases indicate a three count, at D, D, DE in the first bar, so the sixteenth notes would be a sextuplet run, tying the last note of the second sextuplet into the eighth note. I suspect that the last two eighth notes would be played Portato, separating the notes with ...


3

Slurs are ambiguous: they may mean ties between note heads (notational convention), bow direction (technical instruction), or phrasing (musical expression). There's no particular reason why all three couldn't be in effect at some point.


3

First, I view the ties above the notes (last beat and a half of the measures) as a phrasing indicator, to ensure you lead the final triplet into the last beat smoothly. Next, I suspect the composer wants you to maintain the initial note (the down-stem quarter notes) thru the beat as a "drone" under the triplets. So, double-stops. Finally, the tie ...


3

It's definitely a slur from the A to the G♮, and for at least a few reasons: The beginning of this slur/tie is above the initial E. Engravers make mistakes, but that's a hard mistake to rationalize. The first edition of the score makes it pretty clear that the A on beat 1 ultimately moves to the F♯ in the next measure, thereby connecting this ...


2

The "slur" is not a slur - it is called a phrase mark. They look similar, but a phrase mark is best thought of as how you would phrase it if you sang it. Slurs should always be REALLY clear as to which notes are slurred together. Note that not all notes under a phrase mark should be slurred. You may interpret and present the melody as you prefer it! (...


2

The first note of the song, an anacrucis, could have been written as a G with a couple of leger lines, under the treble staff, and thus played with r.h. It's slightly confusing as it has been written on the bass clef, making the slur travel from one stave to the other. As such, yes, it's played legato - if you were singing the words, they'd be legato, ...


2

Put _ before the ( which represents the slur. \version "2.18.2" { \time 3/4 \key g \major \acciaccatura d''8_( <c'' a'>4) <g'b'> r4 } If Lilypond does the opposite, and curves the slur down when you want it up, put a ^ before the (.


2

I'd go generally with 2.2. The fermata position is often dictated by what else is going on in the music. If everybody is to come off at the same time after the pause, then put it on the last note. But if there's something that needs to happen before everyone counts the crotchet a tempo (eg a bit of recitative, a breath, a bit of shady side-eye) then put it ...


2

Unlike what some of the answers and comments state, there is a reason why one could include a slur within a slur (1.1). In jazz, it is common to combine "licks" into slurred sections. I play tenor saxophone and frequently encounter passages like that (one example that comes to mind is the Pink Panther theme). According to my teacher, it means that the first ...


2

The slur just means you play all those notes under the same bow stroke, yet with a separation between each note. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Portato


2

Here is an image from two different editions of the trio, I don't know which ones of those two is Mendelssohn's original one: How you play it can make a difference in how it sounds and feels. But since the cello is playing the same thing in unison with the violin an octave lower I suggest that you and the cello player make an agreement on how you will play ...


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