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14

The outer/larger slur is a phrase marking, letting you know that the entire passage constitutes a single musical idea. The inner slurs are similar, but indicating smaller units. One could think of the inner slurs as indicating words, and the outer slur as denoting a sentence. Part of the reason there are two sets is that there are some places in the phrase ...


11

The easiest way to achieve this is to insert empty chords with <> that catch the open slur or tie. The following code ... << \new Staff { << { f'1( <>) } \\ { \voiceThree e'4_( dis'8 cis') dis'2_( <>) } >> R1 R1 } \new Staff { << { g'8 d'' g''2.( <>) } \\ { g'1( <>) } >> R1 R1 } >> ...


10

Phrase marks here rather than slurs. (How would you slur the first four notes?)Yes, in this case where the melody moves between the staves, the phrase applies to the whole melody. But you'd phrase the entire melody that way whether the phrase mark was there or not. But don't try to dissect this sort of writing too minutely. How shall we play those last ...


9

It's an accent that applies to both notes. In the Peters edition (2007, ed. Leslie Howard), bars 748 and 752, a footnote makes this explicit: Liszt's special accent requires a stress on all the notes under the symbol. In recordings you can often hear the accent implemented as an (extremely) momentary ritardando, as well as the usual increase in loudness....


8

The top staves are "correct" for a slur, the bottom staves are correct for a phrasing slur. For music like violin music, this difference is more poignant than for piano since a slur has separate technical meaning as a bowing direction instruction (which implies legato but the legato can be dissolved with tenuto or staccato marks) while a phrasing slur is ...


7

Although not applicable to the piano piece in the question (the use of which is in the accepted answer), but to clarify for people that may see a similar mark used in student pieces, who may otherwise be confused: In some instructional method books and corresponding pieces, the mark is used to indicate a half step in a new scale or fingering position. ...


7

Whilst they all look like slurs, they're not. Some are ties, which means they're making one long note out of two written. Bar 4, the E notes are as such. But, there's one phrase mark over bars 1 to 4, which is more likely what you're questioning. Imagine speaking, and splitting your sentence into four separate little bits - mini-phrases. That's what's ...


7

Slurs are routinely used in piano scores. Sometimes they just represent phrasing, but they also represent legato playing. They clarify from other types of less legato articulation (e.g., staccato). Two-note slurs have particular meaning: in most classical keyboard music, they mean to play the first note legato and the second note staccato, or otherwise ...


7

Notice that the slurs go away in bar 3. That's the purpose of the sempre legato. It's saying "keep playing this as in the first two measures", rather than writing slurs through the entire score. As the piece progresses, the left-hand is also intended to be sempre legato, except in the couple of places where notes are separated by rests. The ...


6

Control points can be overridden. The pairs here are x,y coordinates: \version "2.19.80" % ... r4 \once\override Slur.extra-offset = #'(0 . 6) \once\override Slur.control-points = #'((1 . -6) (4 . 1) (13 . -6) (18.5 . 0.5)) c4^(^\pp g' % etc and give the image below which can obviously be improved with more ...


6

Two connected slurs like this are effectively equivalent to a single slur. This is bad notation practice, even though it's often seen. Update: it's a misprint. The first edition looks like this:


6

Ultimately, this is a musical decision, so either way is fine. However,... If you want to play the music literally as written, then you would hold the pedal through, so that there's no break between the two slurred passages. My personal preference, both in this simplified arrangement as well as the original, is to leave a small break — a "breath" — ...


5

The textbook Music Notation: A Manual of Modern Practice by Gardner Read answers your first question as follows: When slurs are placed over a passage that ends in a tied note, the slur sign should extend as far as the second note of the tie, rather than end of the first note. The principle involved should be obvious; the breath of the singer or wind ...


5

It might be a misprint, intended to be the same as on the system below. Is there any pattern in the rest of the page to support this? Otherwise, breaking the slur is meaningless. So it's one sort of bad writing, or another sort of bad writing.


5

The slurs in this case are serving as phrase markings; notice that they correspond to the punctuation of the lyrics. They also indicate legato playing, and they are intended to apply to both hands. In measures 5 and 6 in particular, the idea is to keep a legato connection of the melody as its notes shift between hands. This arrangement of the song employs a &...


5

The 4–1 in the Beethoven indicates that you begin playing that C with your fourth finger, but while playing the C you switch to the first finger. The switch is to help facilitate the upcoming leap to F♯; now that your first finger is on the C, it's easier to reach the F♯ with finger four. (Without the switch, you'd keep 4 on the C and use 5 on the F♯!) Also, ...


4

Use \laissezVibrer instead of ~. Cf the notation manual.


4

Your best guide would actually be to listen to recordings & read the writings of acknowledged Beethoven specialists. That said, analysing the lines in the right hand provides some insight. If we remove the octave transpositions & the rests we have this progression in the 4 bars you provided: So you can see from what's happening in the ...


4

how do I move from the A in the first bar to the G in the second bar You don't. There is only 1 G note. Simply slur from A to G, and then hold the G for 3 beats. Why are there 2 G note heads? Because notes can't go over a barline, so the composer had to notate it with 2 note heads connected by a tie. This is just a convention to enhance readability. ...


4

To me, the easiest change is to include \once \override Slur #'direction = #DOWN immediately preceding the \acciaccatura. This produces: \version "2.19.82" line = \relative c'' { \key g \major \time 3/4 << { \once \override Slur #'direction = #DOWN \acciaccatura d8-4 <c a>4-2-1 <g b>4 r4 | } \\ { e,...


4

On many instruments, slurs indicate a particular technique. For wind instruments, it means to play without tonguing. For orchestral strings, it means to play in one bow motion. In these cases, it's critically important for slurs to be in the right places. Outside of that, I think it's simply tradition to use a slur to visually group the grace note in with ...


4

A simple way to achieve this is to write a normal note that looks as if it's a rest, like this: b8 fis' b2.~ | b1\rest | (It's also possible to tweak almost every individual property of every object using \override, but I have to look those up again every time I need them.)


3

Put _ before the ( which represents the slur. \version "2.18.2" { \time 3/4 \key g \major \acciaccatura d''8_( <c'' a'>4) <g'b'> r4 } If Lilypond does the opposite, and curves the slur down when you want it up, put a ^ before the (.


3

Because the Eb3 is in a second voice. In the handbook they explain how to use multiple voices in a staff: https://musescore.org/en/handbook/voices Now TBH, but I'm definitely no expert, I'd find it easier to read if the first Eb3 would be notated in the second voice too, since it alerts me something's coming up, and also since I won't need to hide the ...


3

It's not always easy to tell, but here we are definitely talking about a tie. How to distinguish? A tie is sole functional and can only connect equal pitches (there is the tricky exception of a tie connecting enharmonically equivalent notes in a modulation but the execution would be to hold the note without noticeable intonation correction). Does that ...


3

Yes, it's a tie. You have to play the C once and hold it for 6 quarters. To tell the difference, keep in mind that slurs are used between different notes and ties are used between the same notes. For instance:


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